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2003 World Championships in Athletics Paris, France

2003 9th IAAF World Championships - Paris - Men's 100m

 

 

Host City: Saint-Denis, Paris, France Format: First round (First 3 & 2 fastest to second round) (Aug 24)
Dates: 23 August – 31 August Format: Second round (First 4 to semi-finals) (Aug 24)
Nations participating: 198 Format: Semi-finals (First 4 to final) (Aug 25)
Athletes participating: 1679
    Main venue: Stade de France
Overview by IAAF   Paris Saint Denis stadium 
It was the closest finish yet to a major 100m, with just 11 thousandths covering the first three. Yet the three US Edmonton medallists were not factors. Maurice Greene placed eighth in his semi, injured, while Montgomery and Williams placed fourth and fifth in the final. Silver medallist Brown had broken the world junior record in the third heat of the second round, but that stage of the contest was overshadowed by the actions of Jon Drummond. At the 2001 IAAF Congress, a rule change was approved which meant that any athlete causing a second false start would be automatically disqualified. The new rule was applied from January 1, 2003 with the desired effect of generally reducing the number of false starts. Paris was the first World Championships with the new ruling, and it was followed smoothly in the first round. One by one, three men were disqualified and each was escorted from the track to sympathetic applause. In the second of the quarter-finals, there was an initial false start by Dwight Thomas of Jamaica.
 A yellow card was then shown to all eight starters as a warning that a further false start would result in disqualification. The recall gun went off again and this time a red card was shown to both Drummond (reaction 0.052 compared with the allowable threshold of 0.1) and Powell (0.086). Replays did appear to show that Drummond’s foot twitched in the blocks, but he did not accept his fate. While Powell waited in hope behind the start, the 34 year-old American – a relay gold medallist in 1993 and 1999 – remonstrated with judges, strirred up the crowd and lay down on the track. Even when he did leave the arena, it proved impossible to start the race because of crowd noise in reaction to the affair. The heat was eventually staged after the third and fourth quarter-finals, around 55 minutes late. Later, Drummond was disqualified from the entire championships “for behaviour likely to bring the sport into disrepute.” There was a further unwanted footnote. Chambers – the Seville bronze medallist – was disqualified in retrospect after it was found that he had committed a doping violation on August 1. He had originally been part of the blanket finish, placing fourth, just three thousandths behind Campbell. Two years later, Mongomery’s disqualification was also confirmed (see report of the 2001 100m). He had originally placed fifth

These are the official results of the men's 100 metres event at the 2003 IAAF World Championships in Paris, France. There were a total number of 79 participating athletes, with ten qualifying heats, four quarter-finals, two semi-finals and the final held on Monday 25 August 2003.[1]

At 18 years, 318 days old, silver medallist Darrel Brown became the youngest ever world medallist for the men's 100 m.
 
  100m 25 August 0,0
  Final

Event Report Men 100m Final

There is a new world 100m champion and he hails from St Kitts and Nevis - Kim COLLINS. In the brash bravado laden world of men's sprinting it is refreshing to see a champion so understated.
 
The final saw two Americans, two Britons, two Nigerians and two athletes from the Caribbean lining up in the blocks.
 
The start was even, with Darren CAMPBELL (GBR) marginally getting the better of it. Until halfway the field stayed almost directly in a line with only the Nigerians, Deji ALIU and Uchenna EMEDOLU dropping back slightly. As the momentum built athletes started to stake their claims. Suprisingly, it wasn't the Americans. The USA has won all but two men's world 100m titles, Linford CHRISTIE (GBR) in 1993 and Donovan BAILEY (CAN) two years later.
 
Having finished fourth in his semi-final Commonwealth champion Collins was stranded out in lane one. He started to surge forward. Fresh from a world junior record in the second round Darrel BROWN (TRI) was right in the mix, with Campbell also hurling himself at the line.
 
Collins was victorious by the smallest of margins, stopping the clock in 10.07.
 
Brown out dipped Campbell for the silver. He is the youngest 100m medallist ever, not turning 19 until October 11. Dwain CHAMBERS (GBR) was the next best of the rest. He Brown and Campbell were all awarded the same time, 10.08s, so one hundredth separated the first four. Brown's effort also eclipses Ato BOLDON's bronze medal in 1995, as his country's best 100m finish.
 
World record holder and new dad, Tim MONTGOMERY (USA) was next home in the USA's worst showing since Mike MARSH's fifth in Gothenburg in 1995.
 
Despite looking impressive in the semis USA champ Bernard WILLIAMS couldn't replicate it in the final and came home in sixth. The final two places were filled by Aliu and Emedolu.
 
For the first time in 20 years no man broke 10 seconds for the hundred and Collins 10.07 equals Carl LEWIS' (USA) time from the inaugural world championships in Helsinki in 1983 as the slowest winning time. The fastest times came from the eventual winners as Collins and Brown clocked 10.02 and 10.01 in the second round.
 
Despite the relatively slow times the racing was tight and the Caribbean won the bragging rights with first and second. Great Britain filled the next two spots, then the USA, then Nigeria.
1 Kim Collins SKN 5 Apr 76 10.07
2 Darrel Brown TTO 11 Oct 84 10.08
2 Darren Campbell GBR 12 Sep 73 10.08
4 Dwain Chambers GBR 5 Apr 78 10.08
5 Bernard Williams USA 19 Jan 78 10.13
6 Deji Aliu NGR 22 Nov 75 10.21
7 Uchenna Emedolu NGR 17 Sep 76 10.22
Tim Montgomery USA 28 Jan 75 DQ 32.2.a 10.11
  Semifinals 25 August

Event Report Men 100m Semi Finals

After the drama of the quarterfinals yesterday, the semi-finals of the men's 100m went closer to script.

In the first semi, American Bernard WILLIAMS made a swift exit from the blocks and by 50m had a discernible lead. The first four; Williams, team-mate Tim MONTGOMERY, Nigerian Uchenna EMEDOLU and Kim COLLINS (SKN), had established a break on the rest of the field.

Clearly on cruise control Williams appeared to switch off with 20m still to run. He crossed the line in 10.11, well clear of the field. World record-holder, Montgomery was next home (10.14), with Emedolu and Collins one and two hundredths further back.

If the Commonwealth champ, Collins is to challenge in the final he will need to find the form that took him to 10.02 in the second round. While Montgomery will need to find a couple of metres to mount a serious challenge.

Most disappointing was Britain's Mark LEWIS-FRANCIS who beat no-one home clocking 10.44.

The second semi provided more drama. Defending champion Maurice GREENE (USA) was fastest to respond to the gun but he didn't remain in the lead for long and finished the race limping on his left leg. He finished well back in eighth (10.37).

Up ahead Dwain CHAMBERS (GBR) took the race by the scruff of the neck moving to a clear lead in the closing stages. He crossed the line to win his first race of the championships after second placings in the first two rounds. His time was an encouraging 10.06.

After an impressive first 80m, Nigerian Deji ALIU (10.14) faded and was overtaken by Chambers, Jamaican Darrel BROWN (10.11) and Briton Darren CAMPBELL (10.12).

Ato BOLDON (TRI) continued the nightmare for the HSI squad by finishing sixth in 10.22. He joins training partners Jon DRUMMOND (USA) and Greene on the sidelines for tonight's final.

If the semis are the only guide the final looks to be a match race between Williams and Chambers, but it seems more than possible that either Collins or Montgomery could find the improvement to challenge for the gold.

  Heat 1 0.5
1 Bernard Williams USA 19 Jan 78 10.11
2 Uchenna Emedolu NGR 17 Sep 76 10.15
3 Kim Collins SKN 5 Apr 76 10.16
4 Nicolas Macrozonaris CAN 22 Aug 80 10.27
5 Eric Nkansah GHA 12 Dec 74 10.39
6 Nobuharu Asahara JPN 21 Jun 72 10.42
7 Mark Lewis-Francis GBR 4 Sep 82 10.44
Tim Montgomery USA 28 Jan 75 DQ 32.2.a 10.14
  Heat 2 0.6
1 Dwain Chambers GBR 5 Apr 78 10.06
2 Darrel Brown TTO 11 Oct 84 10.11
3 Darren Campbell GBR 12 Sep 73 10.12
4 Deji Aliu NGR 22 Nov 75 10.14
5 Dwight Thomas JAM 23 Sep 80 10.19
6 Ato Boldon TTO 30 Dec 73 10.22
7 Ronald Pognon FRA 16 Nov 82 10.25
8 Maurice Greene USA 23 Jul 74 10.37
9 Sherwin Vries RSA 22 Mar 80 10.41
  Quarterfinals 24 August

Men 100m Quarter Finals

Controversy rocked the second round of the men's 100m as false starts turned the second heat into something approaching a debacle.
 
At the first attempt Jamaican Dwight THOMAS broke. This left the field with no further warnings, as the new IAAF rule dictates. At the second attempt the field was recalled for another false start. The reaction times read that both Jon DRUMMOND (USA) and Asafa POWELL (JAM) were inside the legal one tenth of a second.
 
At this point the circus began. Drummond, the most demonstrative athlete on the world circuit, was clearly unhappy with the reading. He lay in his lane for some time while officials informed him that he was disqualified. Adamant that he hadn't moved early, television replays showed that both athlete's rear feet twitched prior to their main movement.
 
The lengthy delay eventually led to the athletes being taken from the track, to run after the final heat.
 
The other heats were overshadowed by the drama. The first was taken out by American pair Tim MONTGOMERY and Bernard WILLIAMS, 10.04s and 10.18s. A best for 2003 for the World record holder.
 
The second completed heat, after the postponement, saw a clean start and Trinidad and Tobago's Darrel BROWN streaked to a world junior record. He lowered Dwain CHAMBERS' (GBR) mark from 10.06 to 10.01. The World Junior champion adds this to his world under 18 best. Behind him British pair Darren CAMPBELL and Mark LEWIS-FRANCIS qualified with Eric NKANSAH (GHA).
 
In the next heat Commonwealth Champion Kim COLLINS (SKN) got to the front in the final five metres to win in 10.02s. He was closely followed by Chambers (10.03), Deli ALIU (NGR) and defending champion Maurice GREENE (USA) filling the final qualifying spot.
 
Then the delayed heat was replayed. With pictures of a disconsolate Drummond beamed on to the video screen, the officials found it impossible to get hush for a fresh start as the corwd's boos made their feelings clear.
 
Eventually relative peace was eventually established and the race got under way, with six competitors vying for four semi-final spots. World leader Patrick JOHNSON (AUS) was clearly most unsettled by the furore and dwelled in his blocks.

Ato BOLDON (TRI), Drummond's HSI training partner, clearly gained some adrenaline push from the drama and ran his best time for a number of years. He crossed in first in 10.09s. Next in was Uchenna EMEDOLU (NGR)(10.13s), follwed by Nicolas MACROZONARIS (CAN) (10.16s).

The next two runners Frenchman Ronald POGNON and Dwight Thomas, the man who broke first time around, dead-heated for fourth in 10.23s, so both progress. Accordingly the unlucky Johnson, in 10.27s, was the only one to miss out.
 
Many had postulated that the blue riband event was going through a fallow year with few fast times, but this round proved that it is a hot bed of drama.

  Heat 1 0.6
1 Bernard Williams USA 19 Jan 78 10.12
2 Sherwin Vries RSA 22 Mar 80 10.18
3 Nobuharu Asahara JPN 21 Jun 72 10.23
4 Aimé-Issa Nthépé FRA 26 Jun 73 10.25
5 Leo Myles-Mills GHA 9 May 73 10.25
6 Matt Shirvington AUS 25 Oct 78 10.28
7 Gábor Dobos HUN 21 Feb 76 10.34
Tim Montgomery USA 28 Jan 75 DQ 32.2.a 10.04
  Heat 2 0.7
1 Ato Boldon TTO 30 Dec 73 10.09
2 Uchenna Emedolu NGR 17 Sep 76 10.13
3 Nicolas Macrozonaris CAN 22 Aug 80 10.16
4 Ronald Pognon FRA 16 Nov 82 10.23
4 Dwight Thomas JAM 23 Sep 80 10.23
6 Patrick Johnson AUS 26 Sep 72 10.27
Jon Drummond USA 9 Sep 68 DQ
Asafa Powell JAM 23 Nov 82 DQ
  Heat 3 0,0
1 Darrel Brown TTO 11 Oct 84 10.01
2 Darren Campbell GBR 12 Sep 73 10.14
3 Eric Nkansah GHA 12 Dec 74 10.15
4 Mark Lewis-Francis GBR 4 Sep 82 10.18
5 Yeóryios Theodorídis GRE 12 Dec 72 10.25
6 Michael Frater JAM 6 Oct 82 10.25
7 Matic Osovnikar SLO 19 Jan 80 10.35
8 Gennadiy Chernovol KAZ 6 Jun 76 10.42
  Heat 4 0.6
1 Kim Collins SKN 5 Apr 76 10.02
2 Dwain Chambers GBR 5 Apr 78 10.03
3 Maurice Greene USA 23 Jul 74 10.04
4 Deji Aliu NGR 22 Nov 75 10.04
5 Obadele Thompson BAR 30 Mar 76 10.14
6 Édson Luciano Ribeiro BRA 8 Dec 72 10.28
7 Chen Haijian CHN 5 Apr 80 10.32
8 Roland Németh HUN 19 Sep 74 10.40
  Heats 24 August

Men 100m Heats

The first round of the men's 100m, after much of the talking is done, now it is time to run.
 
All the major players were keen to get through to the second round with little energy expended.
 
With four of the leading contenders the USA had an impressive contingent. Bernard Williams, world record holder and new dad Tim Montgomery and the irrepressible Jon Drummond all took out their heats. Montgomery's 10.07s was the second fastest time of the round.
 
Reigning world champion Maurice Greene (USA) running his first competitive 100m since the Rome Golden League on July 11, was shaded in his heat by Eric Nkansah (GHA). Both were given the same time of 10.18s.
 
Unexpected world leader Patrick Johnson (AUS) failed to be unsettled by four false starts in his heat. His winning time was a relatively slow 10.29s. Compatriot Matthew Shirvington (AUS) was a surprise victor over British hope Dwain Chambers, in the slowest heat, 10.30s and 10.32s.
 
The fastest time came from unheralded Jamaican Asafa Powell, 10.05s. He led in understated Commonwealth champion Kim Collins (SKN), 10.09s.
 
Britain's other runners also progressed with Darren Campbell victorious in heat four, 10.18s, and Mark Lewis-Francis going through from the first heat. That heat was taken out by Obadele Thompson (BAR), 10.15s.
 
Nigeria will be well represented in the next round with Deji Aliu taking out the final heat and Uchenna Emedolu progressing from heat eight.
  Heat 1 0.7
1 Obadele Thompson BAR 30 Mar 76 10.15
2 Yeóryios Theodorídis GRE 12 Dec 72 10.17
3 Mark Lewis-Francis GBR 4 Sep 82 10.17
4 Jarbas Mascarenhas BRA 25 Aug 80 10.36
5 Darren Gilford MLT 11 Dec 82 10.60
6 Aboubaker El Tawerghi LBA 10 Jul 78 10.96
7 Hadhari Djaffar COM 17 Nov 78 11.05
Roman Cress MHL 2 Aug 77 DNS
  Heat 2 0.8
1 Bernard Williams USA 19 Jan 78 10.19
2 Sherwin Vries RSA 22 Mar 80 10.20
3 Gábor Dobos HUN 21 Feb 76 10.22
4 Nobuharu Asahara JPN 21 Jun 72 10.23
5 Souhalia Alamou BEN 31 Dec 79 10.46
6 Khalil Al-Hanahneh JOR 11 May 80 10.81
7 Patrick Mocci Raoumbe GAB 16 Jan 70 11.03
Vahagn Javakhyan ARM 27 Dec 79 DQ
  Heat 3 0,0
1 Patrick Johnson AUS 26 Sep 72 10.29
2 Michael Frater JAM 6 Oct 82 10.32
3 Gennadiy Chernovol KAZ 6 Jun 76 10.33
4 Alexander Kosenkow GER 14 Mar 77 10.36
5 Idrissa Sanou BUR 12 Jun 77 10.42
Maqhawe Maseko SWZ 22 Dec 71 DQ
Mohamad Siraj Tamim LIB 2 Jan 85 DQ
  Heat 4 -0.2
1 Darren Campbell GBR 12 Sep 73 10.18
2 Nicolas Macrozonaris CAN 22 Aug 80 10.23
3 Chen Haijian CHN 5 Apr 80 10.31
4 Konstantin Rurak UKR 9 Apr 74 10.46
5 Markus Pöyhönen FIN 25 Oct 78 10.63
6 Gian Nicola Berardi SMR 21 Feb 79 10.84
7 Reginaldo Micha Ndong GEQ 14 Oct 86 11.47
8 Bahadur Basnet Devi NEP 11.47
  Heat 5 1.7
1 Darrel Brown TTO 11 Oct 84 10.10
2 Édson Luciano Ribeiro BRA 8 Dec 72 10.20
3 Suryo Agung Wibowo INA 8 Oct 83 10.64
4 Sayon Cooper LBR 26 Apr 74 10.67
5 Jaye Jaye Capelle NRU 8 Jan 84 11.49
6 Kaewanteiti Mwatiera KIR 11.86
Jamal Al-Saffar KSA 24 Oct 71 DNS
Tim Montgomery USA 28 Jan 75 DQ 32.2.a 10.07
  Heat 6 0.5
1 Jon Drummond USA 9 Sep 68 10.22
2 Aimé-Issa Nthépé FRA 26 Jun 73 10.30
3 Matic Osovnikar SLO 19 Jan 80 10.31
4 Aziz Zakari GHA 2 Sep 76 10.48
5 Chiang Wai Hung HKG 15 Apr 76 10.70
6 Arben Makaj ALB 16 Jun 67 10.87
7 Djikoloum Mobele CHA 23 Nov 78 11.38
8 Assad Ahmadi AFG 11.99
  Heat 7 0.1
1 Matt Shirvington AUS 25 Oct 78 10.30
2 Dwain Chambers GBR 5 Apr 78 10.33
3 Roland Németh HUN 19 Sep 74 10.37
4 Prodromos Katsantonis CYP 20 Oct 75 10.46
5 Salem Mubarak Al-Yami KSA 9 Feb 82 10.51
6 Serge Bengono CMR 3 Aug 77 10.56
7 John Howard FSM 21 Jul 81 11.08
8 Nay Aung Nay Aung MYA 15 Mar 83 11.37
  Heat 8 -0.6
1 Eric Nkansah GHA 12 Dec 74 10.18
2 Maurice Greene USA 23 Jul 74 10.18
3 Uchenna Emedolu NGR 17 Sep 76 10.22
4 Marc Burns TTO 7 Jan 83 10.28
5 Churandy Martina AHO 3 Jul 84 10.35
6 Tran Van Xuan VIE 10.78
7 Yusof Alias Mohd SIN 8 Feb 71 11.02
8 Mohammad Shamsuddin BAN 15 Sep 83 11.18
  Heat 9 0.9
1 Asafa Powell JAM 23 Nov 82 10.05
2 Kim Collins SKN 5 Apr 76 10.09
3 Leo Myles-Mills GHA 9 May 73 10.25
4 Anson Henry CAN 9 Mar 79 10.33
5 Eric N'Dri CIV 24 Mar 78 10.38
6 Aaron Egbele NGR 29 Jan 79 10.43
7 Andre Blackman GUY 3 Nov 80 10.86
8 Zoran Josifovski MKD 2 Jan 81 11.63
  Heat 10 0.7
1 Deji Aliu NGR 22 Nov 75 10.19
2 Dwight Thomas JAM 23 Sep 80 10.22
3 Ato Boldon TTO 30 Dec 73 10.23
4 Ronald Pognon FRA 16 Nov 82 10.26
5 Roger Anguono-Moke CGO 20 Nov 81 10.50
6 Sébastien Gattuso MON 28 Jun 71 10.94
7 Jaso Molisingi VAN 11.20
8 Somphavanh Somchanmavong LAO 16 Jul 82 11.43

 

 

 

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