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2007 World Championships in Athletics Osaka, Japan

2007 11th IAAF World Championships - Osaka - Women's 200m

 

 

Host City: Osaka, Japan Format: First round (First 4 & 8 fastest to second round) (Aug 29)
Dates: 24 August - 2 September 2007 Format: Semi-finals (First 4 to final) (Aug 30)
Nations participating: 200
Athletes participating: 1,978
    Main venue: Nagai Stadium
Overview by IAAF   nagai stadium01 
Defending champion Felix was the favourite, having run 22.18 in 2007, a fifth of a second quicker than her rivals. Richards, who had failed to make the US squad in the 400m but was second to Felix in the US 200m, was fastest in round two. Campbell and Felix ran together over the first 100m of the final, with Campbell just ahead at the halfway point, 11.10 to 11.15, but Felix then moved away, generating more smooth power than one could have expected from an athlete measuring only 1.68m/53Kg. By the finish, she was a full five metres clear of Campbell, while Jayasinghe again amazed, beating both Edwards and Richards for the bronze medal. Felix’s time of 21.81 was the fastest of the 21st century, the best time since Inger Miller’s 21.77 in 1999. Her winning margin was the greatest at this level since 1948.

The women's 200 metres event at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics took place on 29–31 August (final) at the Nagai Stadium.

Having ran the fastest time in the world this year Allyson Felix entered as the favorite to retain her World Championship title. Her rival Veronica Campbell-Brown was her only threat from retaining her title.

In the final both Felix and Campbell-Brown shot out of the blocks like rockets, matching each other stride for stride, it was a bloody battle for the gold medal position. Coming into the straight, at the midpoint of the race, Veronica seemed to have a slight advantage over Allyson. Then Felix produced a display of speed and strength endurance that was simply astonishing, pulling away from the reigning olympic champion to win by a five metre margin. Veronica and Susanthika Jayasinghe took second and third place respectively.

At just 19 years old Felix ran under 22 seconds for the first time, winning in 21.81 seconds (the only athlete to run under 22 seconds for this race) - this being the time of the Century at the time. Felix wrote herself into history and gave the world a glimpse of what was to come and would go on to be : one of the best track and field athletes in history - the most decorated track and field athlete ever!

Records

World Record 21.34 United States Florence Griffith-Joyner Seoul, South Korea September 29, 1988
Championship Record 21.74 East Germany Silke Gladisch Rome, Italy September 3, 1987

 

 
  200m 31 August 1.7
  Final

Event report: Women’s 200m Final

Allyson Felix became the first woman to defend successfully the 200m World title for 12 years with a stunning display of sprinting in the Nagai Stadium this evening that left her rivals floundering in her wake

It brought her the gold medal in 21.81, the fastest time in the world since 1995 and a full 0.3s improvement on her personal best.

“Tonight is special,” she said. “I have been waiting for so long to run such a time, to run under 22 seconds. It has not been an easy road, but finally I managed it. Running so fast feels great. But it was not really that easy.”

Maybe not, but it certainly looked it.

Felix simply destroyed a field that included the 2003 and 2007 100m champions, the Olympic 200m champion and the 2006 athlete of the year. It was expected to be close, potentially a three-way tie. It wasn’t. Not by a long way.

Felix’s winning margin was more than half a second – the biggest at a global championships since the flying Dutchwoman Fanny Blankers Koen won at the London Olympics in 1948. Yes, bigger even than Florence Griffith Joyner at the 1988 Olympics.

Felix crossed the line some 15 metres ahead of Veronica Campbell, the Jamaican who won the 100m on Monday and holds the Olympic 200m title. And Campbell wasn’t running slowly.

She finished in 22.34, her quickest of the year, while Susanthike Jayasinghe sprang the surprise of the race to take an unexpected bronze in 22.63, a second medal for the Los Angelese-based Sri Lankan who won the silver at this event 10 years ago.

Jayasinghe snatched the medal away from Torri Edwards, the American who now has the unwanted honour of two fourth places in these championships, while Sanya Richards, last year’s athlete of the year for her unbeaten 400m season, could only finish fifth.

Felix is the only woman to defend the 200m title apart from Merlene Ottey who won in 1993 and 1995. In truth she looked the most likely winner from the opening rounds, her graceful, long-striding style appearing to give her extra time, an ability to glide away from her opponents.

As they were called to their blocks she hung her head low, letting her long hair fall about her shoulders. The sprinters seemed to get away clean but after three strides there was a late recall. Jamaica’s Aleen Bailey had false started.

At the second gun Felix, in lane five, got a good start and was soon closing the stagger on Campbell in six and Richards in seven. She ran an impressive bend and led as they entered the straight.

But the manner in which she powered away from the best sprinters in the world from that point on was simply jaw-dropping. Feliz had spent the three previous rounds doing enough to get through, easing down for the last 20, 30, 40 metres. This time the foot stayed hard on the peddle and her stride seemed to get longer with every step.

She crossed the line with a broad grin across her face. Well might she smile. She’d made the rest look pedestrian.

Campbell held her form to finish a shell-shocked second but Richards faded as Jayasinghe in lane eight finished strongly to edge out Edwards in three, whose failure to dip cost a medal and left her in fourth for the second time in the week.

“I’m thankful; a medal is a medal,” said the stunned Jamaican. “In the last 100m she was on her own.” She certainly was.

“I knew that I have a strong finish, that I really had to take it off on the home stretch,” said Felix, who is now gunning for Campbell’s Olympic title in Beijing next year.

“I might consider doing both,” she added, “the 200 and the 400m. But even if I run the 400m more often, I would never give up the 200m.”

After tonight’s performance, why would she? She’s now level with Valerie Brisco-Hooks as the 12th quickest ever.

Osaka 2007 News Team/mkb

1 Allyson Felix USA 18 Nov 85 21.81
2 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM 15 May 82 22.34
3 Susanthika Jayasinghe SRI 17 Dec 75 22.63
4 Torri Edwards USA 31 Jan 77 22.65
5 Sanya Richards-Ross USA 26 Feb 85 22.70
6 Aleen Bailey JAM 25 Nov 80 22.72
7 Lashauntea Moore USA 31 Jul 83 22.97
8 Cydonie Mothersill CAY 19 Mar 78 23.08
  Semifinals 30 August

Event report: Women's 200m Semi-finals

If the finallists carry forward their semifinal form to tomorrow night's showdown between two of the superstars of American track, then Allyson Felix, the defending champion, will surely extend her reign by another two years, for here she looked supreme.

Her semi-final looked to have all the quality of a championship final, with European double sprint champion Kim Gevaert of Belgium drawn on the inside (although she would withdraw without competing), and, extraordinarily, for the third time here in Osaka, Jamaica's new 100m World champion Veronica Campbell was drawn alongside American rival Torri Edwards.

Yet Felix dispensed with the challenges of Campbell and the US 100m champion as if they were mere junior runners, coming into the final 20m of this race with a four-metre advantage, even easing down. Felix clocked 22.21 as Campbell scrambled past Edwards in 22.44 to the American's season's best 22.51, making it 3-0 in their 200m encounters in Osaka.

Sanya Richards, deprived of the chance to race at her better distance, the 400m, by the US selection system, has long looked like the biggest threat to Felix.

But here, she had to work harder and for longer, to achieve primacy in her semi-final, winning in 22.50 from Jamaican Aleen Bailey's 22.65.

Susanthika Jayasinghe of Sri Lanka, 10 years after winning a silver medal in this event, will contest the final again after clocking 22.66, with a fourth American, LaShauntea Moore (22.73) completing the final octet.

Osaka 2007 News Team/sd

  Heat 1 0.8
1 Allyson Felix USA 18 Nov 85 22.21 Q
2 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM 15 May 82 22.44 Q
3 Torri Edwards USA 31 Jan 77 22.51 Q
4 Cydonie Mothersill CAY 19 Mar 78 22.78 Q
5 Sherry Fletcher-Jones GRN 17 Jan 86 22.96
6 Yelena Bolsun RUS 25 Jun 82 23.01
7 Virgil Hodge SKN 17 Nov 83 23.06
Kim Gevaert BEL 5 Aug 78 DNS
  Heat 2 -0.4
1 Sanya Richards-Ross USA 26 Feb 85 22.50 Q
2 Aleen Bailey JAM 25 Nov 80 22.65 Q
3 Susanthika Jayasinghe SRI 17 Dec 75 22.66 Q
4 Lashauntea Moore USA 31 Jul 83 22.73 Q
5 Tezdzhan Naimova BUL 1 May 87 22.88
6 Roxana Diaz CUB 16 May 81 22.98
7 Debbie Ferguson McKenzie BAH 16 Jan 76 23.27
8 Laverne Jones-Ferrette ISV 16 Sep 81 23.34
  Quarterfinals 29 August

Event report: Women’s 200m 1st Round

Torri Edwards versus Veronica Campbell. United States against Jamaica. It was meant to be the story of the 100m final. It didn’t quite happen like that on Monday night as Edwards slipped out of the frame, but the two rehearsed a re-run in first round of the 200m this morning when they were drawn together in the last heat.

Campbell began stage two of her quest to become the third woman to win the sprint double with another victory, although she and Edwards crossed the line virtually stride for stride. Campbell got the verdict in a relaxed 22.87, 0.03 ahead of her US rival.

The reigning champion Allyson Felix showed why she carries the favourite tag. Fastest in the world this year, Felix’s run was as easy as her smile and as graceful as her long stride, which brought her home first in heat one in 22.50, just 0.05 ahead of Susanthike Jayasinghe, the Sri Lankan who ran a season’s best.

That turned out to be the quickest of the round, although her teammate Sanya Richards was not far behind.

Last year’s world athlete of the year thanks to an unbeaten season over 400m, the Jamaican-born 22-year-old runs with a bullet-shaped pendant as a lucky charm. She didn’t need to be firing on all cylinders this morning to hit the target in heat five, which she won easily in 22.74.

In other heats, there were wins for USA’s LaShauntea Moore, a former World Youth Champion, in 22.93, Tezzhan Naimova of Bulgaria in 22.84, and Muriel Hurtis-Houairi of France in 22.83.

Belgium’s European champion Kim GevAert, Sri Lanka’s 1997 silver medallist Susanthike Jayasinghe, and Jamaica’s Olympic relay champion Aleen Bailey also qualified comfortably.

Other than that it was a largely uneventful morning for the half-lappers, the only minor drama coming in heat two when Britain’s Emily Freeman was disqualified for false starting.

That race also featured Somalia’s Abdikarim Sheikh Fowzio who had the tough task of running from lane seven with the likes of Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, the former Commonwealth Games double sprint champion, inside her. By the time Moore and Ferguson had finished, she was still working hard with 60m to go.

It was all worthwhile though. The 15-year-old was rewarded with a person best of 30.87.

Osaka 2007 News Team/mkb

  Heat 1 -0.2
1 Sanya Richards-Ross USA 26 Feb 85 22.31 Q
2 Susanthika Jayasinghe SRI 17 Dec 75 22.55 Q
3 Virgil Hodge SKN 17 Nov 83 22.84 Q
4 Laverne Jones-Ferrette ISV 16 Sep 81 23.03 Q
5 Yuliya Chermoshanskaya RUS 6 Jan 86 23.15
6 Yelena Chebanu UKR 4 Jan 81 23.21
7 Felipa Palacios COL 1 Dec 75 23.24
8 Cathleen Tschirch GER 23 Jul 79 23.50
  Heat 2 0.7
1 Allyson Felix USA 18 Nov 85 22.61 Q
2 Yelena Bolsun RUS 25 Jun 82 22.80 Q
3 Cydonie Mothersill CAY 19 Mar 78 22.82 Q
4 Kim Gevaert BEL 5 Aug 78 22.96 Q
5 Guzel Khubbieva UZB 2 May 76 23.28
6 Tahesia Harrigan IVB 15 Feb 82 23.52
7 Joice Maduaka GBR 30 Sep 73 23.62
8 Zudikey Rodriguez MEX 14 Mar 87 24.31
  Heat 3 -0.4
1 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM 15 May 82 22.55 Q
2 Torri Edwards USA 31 Jan 77 22.62 Q
3 Tezdzhan Naimova BUL 1 May 87 22.87 Q
4 Sherry Fletcher-Jones GRN 17 Jan 86 23.02 Q
5 Iryna Shtanhyeyeva UKR 8 Feb 82 23.17
6 Ewelina Ptak POL 20 Mar 87 23.26
7 Vida Anim GHA 7 Dec 83 23.47
8 Louise Ayetotche CIV 3 Jun 75 23.60
  Heat 4 -0.5
1 Aleen Bailey JAM 25 Nov 80 22.60 Q
2 Lashauntea Moore USA 31 Jul 83 22.71 Q
3 Roxana Diaz CUB 16 May 81 22.79 Q
4 Debbie Ferguson McKenzie BAH 16 Jan 76 22.81 Q
5 Muriel Hurtis FRA 25 Mar 79 22.86
6 Natalya Rusakova RUS 12 Dec 80 22.97
7 Amandine Allou Affoue CIV 29 Aug 80 23.46
8 Geraldine Pillay RSA 25 Aug 77 23.55
  Heats 29 August

Event report: Women’s 200m 1st Round

Torri Edwards versus Veronica Campbell. United States against Jamaica. It was meant to be the story of the 100m final. It didn’t quite happen like that on Monday night as Edwards slipped out of the frame, but the two rehearsed a re-run in first round of the 200m this morning when they were drawn together in the last heat.

Campbell began stage two of her quest to become the third woman to win the sprint double with another victory, although she and Edwards crossed the line virtually stride for stride. Campbell got the verdict in a relaxed 22.87, 0.03 ahead of her US rival.

The reigning champion Allyson Felix showed why she carries the favourite tag. Fastest in the world this year, Felix’s run was as easy as her smile and as graceful as her long stride, which brought her home first in heat one in 22.50, just 0.05 ahead of Susanthike Jayasinghe, the Sri Lankan who ran a season’s best.

That turned out to be the quickest of the round, although her teammate Sanya Richards was not far behind.

Last year’s world athlete of the year thanks to an unbeaten season over 400m, the Jamaican-born 22-year-old runs with a bullet-shaped pendant as a lucky charm. She didn’t need to be firing on all cylinders this morning to hit the target in heat five, which she won easily in 22.74.

In other heats, there were wins for USA’s LaShauntea Moore, a former World Youth Champion, in 22.93, Tezzhan Naimova of Bulgaria in 22.84, and Muriel Hurtis-Houairi of France in 22.83.

Belgium’s European champion Kim GevAert, Sri Lanka’s 1997 silver medallist Susanthike Jayasinghe, and Jamaica’s Olympic relay champion Aleen Bailey also qualified comfortably.

Other than that it was a largely uneventful morning for the half-lappers, the only minor drama coming in heat two when Britain’s Emily Freeman was disqualified for false starting.

That race also featured Somalia’s Abdikarim Sheikh Fowzio who had the tough task of running from lane seven with the likes of Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, the former Commonwealth Games double sprint champion, inside her. By the time Moore and Ferguson had finished, she was still working hard with 60m to go.

It was all worthwhile though. The 15-year-old was rewarded with a person best of 30.87.

Osaka 2007 News Team/mkb

  Heat 1 1.1
1 Allyson Felix USA 18 Nov 85 22.50 Q
2 Susanthika Jayasinghe SRI 17 Dec 75 22.55 Q
3 Sherry Fletcher-Jones GRN 17 Jan 86 22.94 Q
4 Roxana Diaz CUB 16 May 81 23.06 Q
5 Tahesia Harrigan IVB 15 Feb 82 23.46 q
6 Myriam Mani CMR 21 May 77 23.66
  Heat 2 -0.2
1 Lashauntea Moore USA 31 Jul 83 22.93 Q
2 Debbie Ferguson McKenzie BAH 16 Jan 76 23.07 Q
3 Yelena Bolsun RUS 25 Jun 82 23.11 Q
4 Zudikey Rodriguez MEX 14 Mar 87 23.96 Q
5 Kay Khine Lwin MYA 28 Aug 78 24.50
6 Abdikarim Sheikh Fowzio SOM 10 Oct 91 30.87
Emily Freeman GBR 24 Nov 80 DQ
  Heat 3 1.9
1 Tezdzhan Naimova BUL 1 May 87 22.84 Q
2 Laverne Jones-Ferrette ISV 16 Sep 81 23.03 Q
3 Yuliya Chermoshanskaya RUS 6 Jan 86 23.21 Q
4 Iryna Shtanhyeyeva UKR 8 Feb 82 23.23 Q
5 Geraldine Pillay RSA 25 Aug 77 23.39 q
6 Greta Taslakian LIB 16 Aug 85 24.35
  Heat 4 -0.8
1 Sanya Richards-Ross USA 26 Feb 85 22.74 Q
2 Cydonie Mothersill CAY 19 Mar 78 22.86 Q
3 Aleen Bailey JAM 25 Nov 80 22.94 Q
4 Vida Anim GHA 7 Dec 83 23.16 Q
5 Guzel Khubbieva UZB 2 May 76 23.25 q
6 Louise Ayetotche CIV 3 Jun 75 23.34 q
7 Ewelina Ptak POL 20 Mar 87 23.38 q
8 Kristen Nieuwendam SUR 26 Aug 91 24.52
  Heat 5 0.8
1 Muriel Hurtis FRA 25 Mar 79 22.83 Q
2 Kim Gevaert BEL 5 Aug 78 22.91 Q
3 Virgil Hodge SKN 17 Nov 83 23.00 Q
4 Cathleen Tschirch GER 23 Jul 79 23.30 Q
5 Felipa Palacios COL 1 Dec 75 23.32 q
6 Yelena Chebanu UKR 4 Jan 81 23.40 q
7 Kadiatou Camara MLI 4 May 81 23.48
  Heat 6 0.2
1 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM 15 May 82 22.87 Q
2 Torri Edwards USA 31 Jan 77 22.90 Q
3 Joice Maduaka GBR 30 Sep 73 23.22 Q
4 Amandine Allou Affoue CIV 29 Aug 80 23.24 Q
5 Natalya Rusakova RUS 12 Dec 80 23.24 q
6 Ionela Tirlea ROU 9 Feb 76 23.48
7 Sakie Nobuoka JPN 24 Aug 77 23.74

Heat 1 29 AUG 2007 10:40

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 249 Fabienne Féraez BEN BEN 22.81 23.44
3 531 Sherry Fletcher GRN GRN 22.67 22.67
4 960 Allyson Felix USA USA 22.11 22.18
5 574 Tahesia Harrigan-Scott IVB IVB 22.98 22.98
6 342 Myriam Léonie Mani CMR CMR 22.41 23.52
7 358 Roxana Díaz CUB CUB 22.68 22.68
8 865 Susanthika Jayasinghe SRI SRI 22.28 22.99

Heat 2 29 AUG 2007 10:48

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 985 LaShauntea Moore USA USA 22.46 22.46
3 692 Kay Khine Lwin MYA MYA 23.38  
4 681 Zudikey Rodríguez MEX MEX 23.18 23.18
5 797 Yelena Bolsun RUS RUS 22.64 22.78
6 233 Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie BAH BAH 22.19 22.49
7 467 Emily Freeman GBR GBR 23.27 23.27
8 862 Abdikarim Sheikh Fowzio SOM SOM    
9 289 Rakia Al-Gassra BRN BRN 22.80 22.80

Heat 3 29 AUG 2007 10:56

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 297 Tezzhan Naimova BUL BUL 22.43 22.43
3 930 Iryna Shtanhyeyeva UKR UKR 22.72 22.72
4 562 LaVerne Jones-Ferrette ISV ISV 22.52 22.52
5 789 Geraldine Pillay RSA RSA 22.78 23.27
6 656 Gretta Taslakian LBN LBN 24.30 24.33
7 800 Yuliya Chermoshanskaya RUS RUS 22.90 22.90
8 732 Monika Bejnar POL POL 22.91 23.07

Heat 4 29 AUG 2007 11:04

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 511 Vida Anim GHA GHA 22.81 23.14
3 1013 Guzel Khubbieva UZB UZB 23.16  
4 994 Sanya Richards-Ross USA USA 22.17 22.43
5 738 Ewelina Ptak POL POL 23.26 23.26
6 340 Louise Ayétotché CIV CIV 22.76 23.59
7 575 Aleen Bailey JAM JAM 22.33 22.88
8 311 Cydonie Mothersille CAY CAY 22.39 22.52
9 875 Kirsten Nieuwendam SUR SUR 24.77 24.77

Heat 5 29 AUG 2007 11:12

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 239 Kim Gevaert BEL BEL 22.20 22.62
3 440 Muriel Hurtis FRA FRA 22.31 22.38
4 854 Virgil Hodge SKN SKN 22.68 22.68
5 346 Felipa Alicia Palacios COL COL 22.85 23.03
6 686 Kadiatou Camara MLI MLI 23.21 23.34
7 486 Cathleen Tschirch GER GER 22.97 22.97
8 913 Olena Chebanu UKR UKR 22.97 23.60

Heat 6 29 AUG 2007 11:20

Order / LaneBibATHLETECOUNTRYPBSB 2007
2 959 Torri Edwards USA USA 22.28 22.55
3 339 Affoué Amandine Allou CIV CIV 23.08 23.28
4 468 Joice Maduaka GBR GBR 22.83 23.05
5 577 Veronica Campbell-Brown JAM JAM 22.05 22.39
6 606 Sakie Nobuoka JPN JPN 23.33 23.79
7 835 Natalia Rusakova RUS RUS 22.53 22.71
8 779 Ionela Târlea ROU ROU 22.35 22.93

Event preview: Women's 200m

This could be one of the events of the championships. The decision by Allyson Felix to skip the 100m and concentrate on her title defence in the longer sprint is an indication of just how tough it will be to emulate Merlene Ottey and win two successive 200m golds.

Ottey took the title in 1993 and 1995, but in both cases only by the narrowest of margins. Felix tops the world for the event this year thanks to her 22.18 run in Carson, California, back on 20 May, and won the closely fought US trials race in June in 22.34.

Perhaps more signifcantly, she was just 0.01s slower at the rain-drenched Grand Prix meeting in Sheffield in mid-July when she beat the 2006 athlete of the year Sanya Richards, the world’s top 400m runner. Richards has said, emphatically, that she’s going to win the 200m here to make up for missing out on a shot at the one-lap crown.

Indeed, she and Felix have brewed up something of a rivalry over both distances this year. Richards’ quickest 200m, 22.43, came when losing to Felix at the US championships, placing her eighth in the world, but she was just a hundredth slower when Felix pipped her to the line in Sheffield.

She also clocked an impressive 100m personal best 11.05 in Stockholm, so clearly has the speed to rival the sprint specialists. Felix, on the other hand, has been building her stamina, running five 400m races since April, including a career best of 49.70 to beat Richards by 0.02s at that same Stockholm meeting.

But it won’t all be about the two Americans. Olympic champion Veronica Campbell, fresh from her 100m triumph here on Monday, will be aiming to become the third woman to win the sprint double following Silke Gladisch in 1987 and Katrin Krabbe in 1991.

The 25-year-old clocked 22.39 at the Jamaican championships, placing her fifth on the world lists. She was third behind Felix and Richards in Sheffield but looked an impressive winner at the London Grand Prix at the beginning of August.

Others to watch out for include Torri Edwards, third in the US trials, and a disappointing fourth in the 100m final after she had looked favourite for gold.

Apart form Americans and Jamaicans, there’s the French pair Muriel Hurtis-Houairi and Christine Arron. Hurtis-Houairi ran the world’s fourth quickest time of the year at her national championships while Arron is clearly in form judging by her sixth place in the 100m.

And don’t discount the European champion Kim Gevaert from Belgium, who narrowly missed a medal in the 100m and has dipped under 23 seconds three times this year.

Osaka 2007 News Team/mkb

 

 

 

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