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World Competitions in Athletics

1. World Student Games (Universiade) - Athletics Overview

Athletics at the Summer Universiade

 

First Universiade

Dr. Primo NebioloDr. Primo NebioloIn 1959, FISU and the ISU agreed to participate in the games organised in Turin, Italy, by CUSI, the Italian Student Sports Association. That year was undoubtedly the one that left the biggest impression on our federation. In fact, the Italian organisers baptised these 1959 games 'Universiade'. They created the flag with a 'U' surrounded by stars, which was to begin its journey around the world, and replaced the national anthems at the medal-awarding ceremonies with Gaudeamus Igitur. The Universiade in Turin was a success for the local Executive Committee, as well as for the man who was to change the future of the university sports movement: Dr. Primo NEBIOLO. During this Universiade, which brought together 43 countries and 1,400 participants, many non-member federations applied to become members of FISU. However, even though university sport was developing in a peaceful environment, the modus vivendi still needed to be established. In addition to the agreement that had been made concerning national symbols (neither flags nor anthems) and the programme, FISU defined its philosophy in article 2 of its statutes by stipulating: 'FISU pursues its objects without consideration or discrimination of a political, denominational or racial nature'. From then on, FISU was to organise the games at worldwide level.

 

The Expansion of University Sport

Ever since this important period, the Universiades have continued to attract more and more participants. Starting with a total of 1,407 participants in Turin, Italy, in 1959, we reached a total of 6,757 participants from more than 165 countries in Beijing, China, in 2001, and 6,643 participants from 174 countries in Daegu, Korea, in 2003. The highest number of participants was registered at the 2013 Summer Universiade in Kazan, Russia, i.e. 11,759 representing 159 countries. The Winter Universiades experience the same success. In fact, our statistics show that 98 athletes participated in the games in Zell-Am-See, Austria, in 1958, while a record of 2,668 participants from 52 countries came to the Winter Universiade in Trentino, Italy, in 2013. The expansion of university sport around the world created a new need for meets and competitions to complete the Universiade programme. As a consequence, FISU launched the World University Championships in the early sixties.
 Universiade Turin 1970
Universiade Turin 1970

Over 50 years, more than 300 championships have been organised, covering a large range of events (almost always different from the Universiade sports) and gathering  participants from all over the world. Meant to guarantee continuity in the competition programme, these championships take place on even-numbered years and experience an increasing success over the years. They allow a large number of students and university sports leaders to get together on occasions other than Universiades. In 2000, 20 World University Championships were held in different places for different sports, attracting 3,623 participants. In 2002, 24 World University Championships were held, attracting 4,228 participants from 83 countries. In 2010, 27 championships were staged, bringing together 4,431 participants. For 2014, 29 WUC were attributed.

Following a breathtaking 27th Summer Universiade in Kazan (RUS) where no more than eleven (11) Championship sports where present, as well as a successful year of World University Championships in 2012, where 27 events took place in 17 countries over 4 continents, the 2014 edition of WUCs was amazing. Starting early March and running until mid-December, the 2014 World University Championships included 28 events in a single year, this time in 23 countries and over the 5 continents (17 Europe, 7 Asia, 2 America, 1 Africa and 1 Oceania). The Championships took place for the first time in Belarus, India, Kazakhstan, Malaysia and Singapore.

 

The 2017 edition of the Summer Universiade was attributed respectively to the cities of Taipei City (Tapei). The 2017 and 2019 editions of the Winter Universiade will be held in Almaty (Kazakhstan) and Krasnoyarsk (Russia) respectively.

FISU supports these competitions which give student-athletes the opportunity to come together from all around the world in a spirit of understanding and peace, with a view to obtaining results at high technical level.
 

Athletics is one of the sports at the biennial Universiade competition. It has been one of the event's competed sports since the inaugural edition.

Editions

Games Year Host city Host country
I 1959 Turin  Italy
II 1961 Sofia  Bulgaria
III 1963 Porto Alegre  Brazil
IV 1965 Budapest  Hungary
V 1967 Tokyo  Japan
VI 1970 Turin  Italy
VII 1973 Moscow  Soviet Union
VIII 1975 Rome  Italy
IX 1977 Sofia  Bulgaria
X 1979 Mexico City  Mexico
XI 1981 Bucharest  Romania
XII 1983 Edmonton, Alberta  Canada
XIII 1985 Kobe  Japan
XIV 1987 Zagreb  Yugoslavia
XV 1989 Duisburg  West Germany
XVI 1991 Sheffield  United Kingdom
XVII 1993 Buffalo, New York  United States
XVIII 1995 Fukuoka  Japan
XIX 1997 Sicily  Italy
XX 1999 Palma de Mallorca  Spain
XXI 2001 Beijing  China
XXII 2003 Daegu  South Korea
XXIII 2005 İzmir  Turkey
XXIV 2007 Bangkok  Thailand
XXV 2009 Belgrade  Serbia
XXVI 2011 Shenzhen  China
XXVI 2013 Kazan  Russia
XXVIII 2015 Gwangju  South Korea
XXIX 2017 Taipei Chinese Taipei Chinese Taipei
XIX 2019 Naples  Italy
 

History of Athletics in FISU

Etymologically, athletics derives from the Greek term “athlos”, which describes some kind of contest or competition. Its roots are prehistoric as athletic elements are among the oldest of all sports, including running, walking, jumping, and throwing. Nowadays, athletics is a perfect example of the Olympic motto ‘Citius, Altius, Fortius’ (‘Faster, Higher, Stronger’). The competitions require athletes to run faster, throw further, jump higher and leap longer than their rivals. With over 1,000 athletes competing in 50 events, athletics is the largest individual sport in the programme of the Summer Universiade.
Whereas the early roots of university athletics may be found in the 1920s with the National Union of French Students staging the International University Championships in Paris (including an athletics-only programme), its FISU history started with the International Summer Sports Weeks and with its inclusion into the compulsory programme at the first edition of the Summer Universiade in Turin (ITA) in 1959. In fact, the Turin Universiade was a remarkable success with superb athletes such as the Italian sprinter, Livio Berruti, or the Romanian high jumper, Iolana Balas, competing in the events. A total of 17 athletics records were broken, crowing the success of the first Summer Games. The organisation of the 1961 Universiade was entrusted to the young Bulgarian student sports association, where the athletics performance turned out to be particularly impressive, with two World and 20 Universiade records being taken. In the following years, athletics continued to increase in size and importance. High-level athletes such as Matson, Kirsztenstein, Crothers and Ottoz attracted crowds and turned the athletics competitions into spectacular events. The Turin Universiade in 1970 remains without doubts one of the most astonishing feats in Universiade history. With a total of 98 national, 40 Universiade, 2 European and 2 World records, the athletics events concluded beyond all expectations. At this stage the latest, athletics was well-considered not only for its number of participants but also and specifically for its high quality of competition. The Bucharest (ROM) edition in 1981 continued this path and 14 Universiade records were broken. Not even the cancellation of the Universiade in Sao Paulo in 1989 could hurt the success of university athletics. FISU accepted a proposal from the German university sports association to organise a Universiade limited to four sports, including athletics, and Olympic champions such as the young Michael Johnson and Paula Ivan participated in the event. The 1990s continued to progress athletics, ensuring to maintain its high standards into the 21st century.

 

FISU Regulations

The athletics events will be organised in accordance with the most recent technical regulations of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The programme and duration of the competitions will be fixed by the Executive Committee in agreement with the Organising Committee and the CTI. In principle, the programme shall last six (6) days and include the following events:
 

 

Track discipline

Field discipline

Road

Men

100m, 200m, 400m, 800m,

Jumps: high, long,

20km walk, half marathon

 

1500m, 5000m and 10.000m

triple and pole vault

 

 

Hurdles: 110m and 400m

Throws: discus, javelin,

 

 

3000m steeplechase

shotput, hammer

 

 

Relays: 4 x 100m and 4 x 400m

 

 

 

Decathlon

 

Women

100m, 200m, 400m, 800m,

Jumps: high, long,

20km walk, half marathon

 

1500m, 5000m and 10.000m

triple and pole vault

 

 

Hurdles: 100m and 400m

Throws: discus, javelin,

 

 

3000m steeplechase

shotput, hammer

 

 

Relays: 4 x 100m and 4 x 400m

   
 

Heptathlon

  


Each country is authorised to enter in: 

  1. an individual event: two (2) athletes, both of whom have achieved the entry standard for the event in the year before the Universiade or one (1) athlete who has not achieved the entry standard;
  2. a team event: one (1) team
  3. For 10.000m for men and women, a maximum of three (3) athletes, all of whom have achieved the entry standard of the event in the year before the Universiade or two (2) who have not achieved the entry standard. 
  4. For the half-marathon and 20-km walk for men and women, a maximum of five (5) athletes, all of whom have achieved the entry standard of the event in the year before the Universiade or three (3) who have not achieved the entry standard.
  5. Each delegation entering a race walk or half-marathon team shall take part with a minimum of three (3) and a maximum of five (5) athlete

 

 

Minimum Requirements for Athletics 

The Organising Committee must provide, for exclusive use, one athletics stadium with full support facilities as approved by the Athletics CT. The IAAF regulations must be followed.
 

Competition Facilities

Type of Venue

Number of Venues

Changing room competitors

Changing room TOJR

Spectator Seating

Press and Media Seating

Stadium

1

Gender Segregated

X

25,000

500

Warm-up

1

Gender Segregated

-

-

-

Track & Field Training

1

Gender Segregated

-

-

-

Jumps & Throws Training

1

Gender Segregated

-

-

-

 

  • An athletics track with synthetic surface complying with IAAF Rules
  • It must have 8 lanes with a 10-lane sprint straight
  • A full range of track and field equipment within the approved range of the IAAF
  • Two (2) x (12 line electronic scoreboard) + six (6) infield scoreboards
  • A warm-up facility for track and field events within or immediately adjacent to the stadium with the same technical characteristics and materials as those used during competitions
  • An athletics track and field training area with the same technical characteristics and materials as those used during competitions
  • A jumps and throws training area equipped with throwing implements with the same technical characteristics and materials as those used during competitions
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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