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3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events

Olympic Events in Athletics - 4 × 400 metres Relay (Men's)

4 × 400 metres Relay (Men's)

 
First Gold Medalist
USA United States 1912 US relay team
 

Games: 24 games in 20 countries
First Held: 1912 Summer Games
Last Held: 2016 Summer Games

Participants: 1471 from 92 countries
Top Athlete Medalist(s): BAH Chris Brown (4 medals)
Top Country Medalist(s): USA United States (20 medals)

4x400 Meter Relay For Men at Olympics

4x400 meter Relay for Men at Olympics: The 4x400 meter relay event is also known as the long relay event. In the event, four runners run one lap of 400 meter length each. Generally the 4x400 meter relay event is the last event to be held in a competition. Like other relay events, the athletes competing in the 4x400 meter relay event are also bound to carry the baton with

 
them. In this event, passing the baton is the responsibility of the receiving runner. In rare cases, there is a disqualification in the 4x400 meter event. The runners coming from behind generally have a psychological advantage over those running in front.

4x400 meter Relay for Men in Summer Olympics: The 4x400 meter relay event was included into the Olympic schedule in the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games. After the 1912 Games, the event has always been held in the Summer Games. The United States of America has always been leading the domain of the 4x400 meter relay event.

Rules for 4x400 meter Relay for Men at Olympics: The rules followed at the international competitions for the track and field events are set by the International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF. The rules generally followed in the 4x400 meter relay event at the international competitions are-

  • There should be marks on the track at every 100 meter to denote the distance covered in each leg.
  • The "take-over zone" is the area where the baton is passed to the next. The length of the take-over zone is 20 meter. The receiving athlete is responsible for the passing of baton in the 4x400 meter event.
  • In the 4x400 meter relay event, the athletes are allowed to break their lanes after a certain distance in each leg.
  • The number of substitutes a team can have in the 4x400 meter relay event is two.
  • In baton used in the relay races are made of wood. The baton should be a smooth hollow tube. The IAAF has specified the size of baton used in the relay race.
  • The passing of baton is only permitted in the take-over zone specified by the IAAF.
  • Wearing of gloves or using of any substance to enhance the gripping power is prohibited in the relay races.
  • No athlete is allowed to obstruct other athletes' way during the race. The offending athlete can be disqualified from the competition. The referee can also arrange for a re-run of the event.
  • The athletes are not allowed to leave their respective lanes after handing over the baton and after receiving the baton.
  • An athlete leaving the track during the race is not permitted to enter the race again.
  • After two consecutive false starts, an athlete is disqualified from the competition.
  • The athlete, who is unable to make it to the finishing line, is not given any credit for his performance.
  • The IAAF approved automatic timing device is used for measuring time during the race.

Medal Winners in the 4x400 meter Relay for Men at Olympics: The American athletes have been dominating the 4x400 meter relay event since the time of its advent. Milton Campbell, Deon Minor, Dameon Johnson, Andre Morris, Michael Johnson, Tyree Washington, Antonio Pettigrew, Jerome Young, Ron Freeman, Herb McKenley, Julius Sang, Darold Williamson, Jeremy Wariner, Derrick Brew, Otis Harris, Calvin Harrison, Alvin Harrison, Anthuan Maybank, Derek Mills, LaMont Smith, Steve Lewis, Quincy Watts, Andrew Valmon, Butch Reynolds, Kevin Robinzine, Danny Everett, Antonio McKay, Alonzo Babers, Ray Armstead, Herman Frazier, Robert Ouko, Lee Evans, Larry James, Vincent Matthews, Henry Carr, Glenn Ashby Davis, Earl Young, Tom Courtney, Herb McKenley, Mal Whitfield, Mel Sheppard, Ted Meredith and Oliver MacDonald are some important athletes who are known for their achievements in the 4x400 meter relay event.

 4X400 1968

Olympic history: Men’s relays

In the final part of a special series in the run-up to Rio 2016, Steve Smythe looks at the history of the men’s relay events at the Olympic Games

1908-2012

In the first Olympic relay final – a medley relay of 200m, 200m, 400m and 800m held in London in 1908 where runners touched hands rather than pass a baton – USA won easily in 3:29.4.

Britain won the first 4x100m in 1912 in Stockholm (see “British successes” below) but as in most men’s relays, the USA won the 4x400m easily with their team including Mel Sheppard, who was running his ninth race in 10 days having also run the 400m, 800m and 1500m. Their time was a world record 3:16.6.

The USA 4x100m team set a world record in Antwerp in 1920 of 42.2 and they improved that to 41.0 in Paris in 1924, a time they set in both heat and final.

Their 4×400 team suffered a shock defeat to Britain in 1920 but normal service was resumed at Paris as they won in a world record 3:16.0. Four years later in Amsterdam a completely different squad lowered that to 3:14.2 as Germany, Canada and Sweden also bettered the previous mark.

In the Netherlands, USA’s 4x100m team equalled the 41.0 world record and they proved their dominance even more in 1932 in Los Angeles as they lowered the record to 40.6 in the heat and then 40.0 in the final without using Eddie Tolan, Ralph Metcalfe and George Simpson, who had swept the medals in the 200m and placed three in four in the 100m.

They also dominated the 4x400m, setting a historic 3:08.2 to destroy the previous world mark of 3:12.6.

The Americans also broke a barrier in Berlin in 1936 – the 40 second mark in the 4x100m as Jesse Owens was part of a team that won by 1.3 seconds in 39.8.

Controversy reigned as the Americans dropped the only two Jewish members of their squad in Germany, seemingly because of pressure from the hosts. They were well beaten by the Brits, though, in the 4x400m.

USA dominated both relays in London in 1948, albeit in modest times. They retained the 4x100m title in Helsinki in 1952, but they were beaten in a sensational race in the 4x400m. Jamaica had hoped to rival them in 1948, but Arthur Wint pulled a muscle and they failed to finish. The same quartet returned to Finland and, aided by a startling 44.6 leg by Herb McKenley, they edged the Americans with a world record 3:03.9 to take more than four seconds off the previous mark.

With Jamaica disqualified, the USA regained the long relay title in Melbourne in 1956, when they reduced the 4x100m world mark to 39.5. Seeking their ninth successive title, they equalled that mark in the Rome 1960 heats, but although they were faster in the final, they were disqualified and Germany, who were second across the line, took gold and a share of the world record with their 39.5 victory.

They made up for some of the disappointment in Italy with a world record 3:02.2 as Olympic champion Otis Davis held off his fellow world record-setter from the final, Carl Kaufmann, who took Germany well inside the old mark too.

Curiously, Jamaica, Trinidad and Barbados combined in these Games and competed as British West Indies with a mostly Jamaican team finishing third.

They improved the record again to 3:00.7 in winning the title in Tokyo in 1964. They also set a record in the 4x100m but in more sensational style as 100m champion Bob Hayes took off in fifth place on the final leg. He ran what many regard the greatest relay leg in history as he stormed through in an estimated 8.9 to give them an easy win in 39.0.

With further poor baton passing, they also had to come from behind in 1968 in Mexico and this time it was 100m champion James Hines who came through. He moved from third to first as they won in 38.24 with the first four beating the old record mark.

The USA had no such troubles in the 4x400m. Aided by Larry Freeman’s 43.2 – then the fastest leg ever recorded – and anchored by world record-holder Lee Evans, they obliterated the record, winning by more than three seconds in 2:56.2.

Kenya took second and were led off by Daniel Rudisha, then notable as the first Masai tribesman to run in an Olympics but now more noted as the father of the London 2012 800m champion, David.

The USA didn’t have the same fortune in Munich in 1972. They suspended the first two in the individual 400m, Vince Matthews and Wayne Collett, for not showing respect at the medal ceremony as they were talking and fidgeting through the US anthem. John Smith, who failed to finish the 400m as he was injured, was also unable to run the relay and so the squad were left with just three runners out of the declared six.

In USA’s absence, Kenya won as Julius Sang’s 43.6 leg took him past the fading German Karl Honz, who dropped from first to fourth in the final straight. However, USA won the 4x100m in a world record 38.19, and so for the first time in eight Olympics the winning team did not include the 100m winner as Valeriy Borzov and the Soviet squad were third.

They retained the sprint relay title in Montreal in 1976 and also won the 4x400m with ease with defending champions Kenya boycotting the event.

USA boycotted Moscow in 1980 where the Soviets narrowly beat East Germany in the slowest winning time for 20 years. Against the rules back then, the Soviets controversially rested 400m champion Viktor Markin and then claimed his replacement was injured for the final so they could bring in the one-lap winner. The Soviets also edged the sprint relay with Poland close behind.

The USA returned in style in Los Angeles in 1984 and with the East Europeans absent, won the sprint relay in a world record 37.83, with Carl Lewis contributing a 8.94 anchor to win his fourth gold medal of the Games. They also won the 4x400m in a quality race as they won in 2:57.91 with four teams dipping below three minutes for the first time.

They were more dominant in Seoul in 1988 as they won in a world record-equalling 2:56.16 to take gold by more than four seconds. However, the Americans didn’t impress in the 4x100m as they were disqualified in the heats and, in their absence, the Soviets surprisingly regained the title.

They made up for it at Barcelona in 1992 as Carl Lewis completed a world record 37.40 run with them also setting a record in the 4x400m as they ran 2:55.74 with Quincy Watts running 43.1 and Steve Lewis 43.4. The margin was again around four seconds.

They were pushed much closer in Atlanta in 1996 as with 200m and 400m champion Michael Johnson absent with injury, they ran 2:55.99.

The USA had won 15 of the 19 previous 4x100m finals, but all their four losses had been through disqualifications in heats or finals. However, for the first time they were genuinely beaten in Atlanta. Canada, aided by 100m champion Donovan Bailey, won easily in 37.69 and it would have been quicker had he not started celebrating 10 metres before the finish.

America were back in command in Sydney in 2000 as they took the gold in 37.61.They also crossed the line first in the 4x400m in 2:56.35 but it was later revealed that one of their team Jerome Young, who had run in the heats, was ineligible to compete due to a failed drugs test. Nigeria were eventually made Olympic champions.

They won in Athens in 2004 but sensationally lost the 4x100m (see ‘most memorable’ below).

Jamaica, aided by Usain Bolt, won the sprint relays in both 2008 and 2012, the latter in a still-standing world record 36.84.

The USA nevertheless won the 4x400m in Beijing in 2008 but lost to the Bahamas in London in 2012.

Most memorable Olympics: Athens 2004

On paper it wasn’t a match. The USA had 100m champion Justin Gatlin, 200m champion Shawn Crawford and five-time world champion Maurice Greene in their quartet.

The British squad had four runners who had failed to make any finals in Greece.

In the semi-finals, even by resting Gatlin, the USA beat Britain by half a second in 38.02.

In the final, Jason Gardener gave the British team a good start and had a good first change-over while Crawford slowed badly before handing the baton to Gatlin.

Gatlin’s changeover to Coby Miller was even worse as Miller had to slow right down to take the baton and Gatlin trod on his team-mate’s foot as Darren Campbell’s second leg and subsequent handover to Marlon Devonish went well.

Miller came back a little on the other teams but Greene set off two metres behind Mark Lewis-Francis. Greene closed the gap but finished a hundredth of a second down as Britain won the tightest Olympic relay in history.

The 4x400m went the other way as the USA won by the biggest ever margin of 4.69 seconds and their 2:55.91 time was the fastest in the world for six years. Australia and Nigeria followed them home.

4 × 400 metres Relay (Men's) History Year by Year (by IAAF) 1896-2012

 4X400-1.JPG  4X400-2.JPG
  
Stockholm, 15 Jul 1912
(Competitors: 28; Countries: 7; Finalists: 12/3)

Final

The final was held on Monday, July 15, 1912.

Place Athletes Time
1  Mel Sheppard, Edward Lindberg, Ted Meredith, Charles Reidpath (USA) 3:16.6 WR
2  Charles Lelong, Robert Schurrer, Pierre Failliot, Charles Poulenard (FRA) 3:20.7
3  George Nicol, Ernest Henley, James Soutter, Cyril Seedhouse (GBR) 3:23.2
Britain were the fastest of the heat winners, clocking 3:19.0 ahead of Canada (3:22.2). Both the United States (3:23.3) and France (3:22.5) were comfortable victors in their preliminaries. Sheppard gained 5m on Lelong on the first leg, with Nicol, injured, well back, and thereafter the USA gained on each leg, winning by a comfortable 30m with a world record 3:16.6.
Antwerp, 23 Aug 1920
(Competitors: 24; Countries: 6; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

The final was held on Monday, August 23, 1920.

Place Athletes Time
1  Cecil Griffiths, Robert Lindsay, John Ainsworth-Davis, Guy Butler (GBR) 3:22.2
2  Henry Dafel, Clarence Oldfield, Jack Oosterlaak, Bevil Rudd (RSA) 3:23.0
3  Géo André, Gaston Féry, Maurice Delvart, André Devaux (FRA) 3:23.5
4  George Schiller, George Bretnall, Ted Meredith, Frank Shea (USA) 3:23.6
5  Sven Krokström, Sven Malm, Eric Sundblad, Nils Engdahl (SWE) 3:24.3
6  Jules Migeot, Omer Corteyn, Omer Smet, François Morren (BEL) 3:24.9
There were two superfluous heats eliminating no teams. The teams started without any staggers in a line, and the 19 year-old Griffiths took an early lead, avoiding a collision at the first exchange between Schiller and Krokström, and a similar incident between André and Dafel of the favoured South African team. The British stayed ahead throughout the race, and Rudd went from fourth to second on the anchor leg, while Devaux just held off Shea for the bronze medal. Guy Butler, the British anchorman later became an official and was an avid filmer of athletics meetings for decades. Photographic evidence suggests the winning margin was 8m, rather than the 6m or 15m generally quoted.
Paris, 13 Jul 1924
(Competitors: 28; Countries: 7; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

The final was held on Sunday, July 13, 1924 and was started at 5:15 p.m.

Place Athletes Time
1  Commodore Cochran, William Stevenson, Oliver MacDonald, Alan Helffrich (USA) 3:16.0 WR
2  Artur Svensson, Erik Byléhn, Gustaf Wejnarth, Nils Engdahl (SWE) 3:17.0
3  Edward Toms, George Renwick, Richard Ripley, Guy Butler (GBR) 3:17.4
4  Horace Aylwin, Alan Christie, Don Johnson, Billy Maynes (CAN) 3:22.8
5  Raymond Fritz, Gaston Féry, Francis Galtier, Barthélémy Favodon (FRA) 3:23.4
 Guido Cominotto, Luigi Facelli, Alfredo Gargiullo, Ennio Maffiolini (ITA) 3:28.0
The heats succeeded in eliminating just one team (Finland), and Britain had to make do without the 400m gold medallist Eric Liddell, as he was preaching in church that day. Nevertheless Britain led by 2m at the end of the first leg from the USA and Sweden. Stevenson, who in later life represented the USA as the Ambassador to the Philippines, took charge of the race on the second leg. He gave the US a lead they never relinquished, finishing 5m ahead of Sweden after a 49.2 segment. MacDonald gained slightly on Sweden as Ripley caught Wejnarth. Butler set off in pursuit of Helffrich, but misjudged his pace, and ran out of steam in the last 100m, being passed by Engdahl for silver. Helffrich guided the USA to a world record after running the fastest leg (48.2).
Amsterdam, 5 Aug 1928
(Competitors: 56; Countries: 14; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Country Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) United States 3:14.2 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Germany 3:14.8  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Canada 3:15.4  
4 Sweden 3:15.8  
5 Great Britain 3:16.4  
6 France 3:19.4  
The track had not been kind to the sprinters at the 1928 Olympics, the heavy surface slowing times appreciably. However, the lack of big international quality 4 x 400m races meant that the world record from 1924 was vulnerable. The USA led from the gun, but after two legs their advantage was just 2m over Canada, with Germany a similar distance behind in third place. “Bud” Spencer extended the USA lead to 6m with a 47.8 leg, though Byléhn produced the fastest 400m of the race (47.4) to bring Sweden into contact with Canada. The individual champion, Barbuti, took the USA home 5m ahead in the world record time of 3:14.2, with Germany a clear second ahead of Canada. The British team, thought to be of medal capability lost two seconds when Craner started too early and had to retrace his steps to take the baton.
Los Angeles, 7 Aug 1932
(Competitors: 28; Countries: 7; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Ivan Fuqua
Ed Ablowich
Karl Warner
Bill Carr
United States 3:08.14 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Crew Stoneley
Tommy Hampson
Lord Burghley
Godfrey Rampling
Great Britain 3:11.2  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ray Lewis
Jimmy Ball
Phil Edwards
Alex Wilson
Canada 3:12.8  
4 Joachim Büchner
Walter Nehb
Adolf Metzner
Otto Peltzer
Germany 3:14.4  
5 Itaro Nakajima
Iwao Masuda
Seikan Oki
Teiichi Nishi
Japan 3:14.6  
6 Giacomo Carlini
Giovanni Turba
Mario De Negri
Luigi Facelli
Italy 3:17.8
The result was little in doubt, particularly after the United States beat the listed world record of 3:14.2 with 3:11.8 in the heats, despite Carr jogging the last few metres. Ivan Fuqua gave the USA a head start in the final with an opening leg of 47.1, beyond the capabilities of all non- American 400m men of the time. Despite a fine leg of 46.7 by Lord Burghley, it was clear that barring accidents the USA would win with world record holder Carr on the anchor leg. Rampling made a valiant attempt to close on Carr, but suffered for it in the last third of his leg, as Carr produced the fastest split of the race (46.2), leading the USA to the first sub-3:10 clocking.
Berlin, 9 Aug 1936
(Competitors: 49; Countries: 12; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Country Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Great Britain 3:09.0  
2nd, silver medalist(s) United States 3:11.0  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Germany 3:11.8  
4 Canada 3:11.8  
5 Sweden 3:13.0  
6 Hungary 3:14.8  
Having changed their policy in the 4 x 100m relay and used their top men, the USA inexplicably did not use Williams and LuValle in the 4 x 400m relay. As a result, the gold was virtually handed to the British. After Limon led the first leg by 6m from Cagle, Rampling took over for Britain, running a storming leg of 46.7 to take a 3m lead. With Roberts (fourth in the 400m) and Brown (silver medallist) to follow the Britons were not to be denied, and with laps of 46.4 and 46.7 they came home more than 15m clear of the USA. The subsequently great Rudolf Harbig just held off Loaring of Canada for the bronze medal.
London, 7 Aug 1948
(Competitors: 60; Countries: 15; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Country Time (hand) Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) United States 3:10.4  
2nd, silver medalist(s) France 3:14.8  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Sweden 3:16.0  
4 Finland 3:24.8  
  Jamaica   DNF
  Italy   DNF
The USA and Jamaica were set to have a titanic battle, with the Caribbean team boosted by the 400m champion Wint, and the world 400m record holder – Herb McKenley. The USA built up a lead of over 10m on the first two legs, and Wint began to cut down Cochran’s lead with his gigantic strides, when a pulled muscle cut down the Jamaican, leaving him lying on the infield while the USA cruised to victory. For Cochran it was a case of keeping things in the family, as his older brother Commodore had won relay gold in 1924.
Helsinki, 27 Jul 1952
(Competitors: 72; Countries: 18; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Country Time (hand) Time (automatic) Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Jamaica 3:03.9 3:04.04 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) United States 3:04.0 3:04.21  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Germany 3:06.6 3:06.78  
4 Canada 3:09.3 3:09.37  
5 Great Britain 3:10.0 3:10.23  
6 France 3:10.1 3:10.33
In an Olympic Games full of exciting competition this was probably the greatest race of all. The United States, with huge (1.88/95Kg) Ollie Matson, who was later a great running back in the NFL, took a slim lead on the first leg over ’48 champion Wint. Cole then extended that lead with a splendid 45.5 split ahead of the 47.0 of Laing, compared to flat bests of 46.7 and 47.5 for the two men. As McKenley took over the baton he was more than 12m behind, and he began to make up the deficit in the first half. At halfway he was still some 8m back, and it seemed that he would “blow up” in his attempt to catch the 400m Hurdles winner Charlie Moore. This was McKenley’s last opportunity to win a gold medal, and he seized the moment by not only closing on Moore, but passing him in the last few strides after a lap of 44.6 seconds. No-one had ever run a relay leg under 45 seconds before (Rhoden had run 45.4 in 1950), so McKenley’s performance was superlative. Rhoden now had the task of holding off Whitfield. On paper this was not difficult as he was the Olympic 400m Champion in a race which had seen Whitfield, the 800m winner, finish last. However, Whitfield, with three Olympic gold medals under his belt, was clearly a danger. The whole way round the last lap Rhoden led with Whitfield on his shoulder, and the Jamaican held on to win by a metre, with both teams more than four seconds under the world record – the biggest improvement in the history of the event. Behind the two top teams Germany also broke the old record, with Haas running a fine anchor leg of 45.9.
Melbourne, 1 Dec 1956
(Competitors: 60; Countries: 15; Finalists: 24/6)

Final classification

RANK NATION NAME ATHLETES HEAT FINAL
Med 1.png  United States (USA) Tom Courtney
Charles Jenkins
Lou Jones
Jesse Mashburn
3:10.6 3:04.7
Med 2.png  Australia (AUS) Graham Gipson
Kevan Gosper
Leon Gregory
David Lean
3:10.4 3:06.0
Med 3.png  Great Britain (GBR) Peter Higgins
Derek Johnson
John Salisbury
Michael Wheeler
3:08.8 3:07.1
4.  Germany (EUA) Karl-Friedrich Haas
Jürgen Kühl
Walter Oberste
Manfred Porschke
3:09.8 3:08.2
5.  Canada (CAN) Douglas Clement
Murray Cockburn
Laird Sloan
Terry Tobacco
3:10.6 3:10.2
6.  Jamaica (JAM) Keith Gardner
George Kerr
Mel Spence
Malcolm Spence
3:11.0 DSQ
Only Britain (3:08.7) and Germany (3:09.8) broke 3:10 in the heats, with Czechoslovakia the fastest non-qualifiers with 3:10.8. In the final, the United States were threatened for the first half of the race by Australia, who were level at that point, but Jenkins broke open the race with the fastest lap of the day – 45.5 – and Courtney anchored the powerful US squad home with more than 10m advantage over Australia. Jamaica were disqualified for impeding Germany on the second leg.
Rome, 8 Sep 1960
(Competitors: 76; Countries: 19; Finalists: 24/6)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Jack Yerman
Earl Young
Glenn Davis
Otis Davis
United States 3:02.37 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Joachim Reske
Manfred Kinder
Jo Kaiser
Carl Kaufmann
Germany 3:02.84  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Malcolm Spence
Jim Wedderburn
Keith Gardner
George Kerr
British West Indies 3:04.13  
4 Edward Jefferys
Edgar Davis
Gordon Day
Malcolm Spence
South Africa 3:05.18  
5 Malcolm Yardley
Barry Jackson
John Wrighton
Robbie Brightwell
Great Britain 3:08.47  
6 René Weber
Ernst Zaugg
Hansruedi Bruder
Christian Wägli
Switzerland 3:09.55  
The fastest leg in the first round came from Josef Trousil (TCH) – 45.4 – but his team was eliminated in 3:11.2. In the semi-finals Canada was anchored by Terry Tobacco’s 45.8, but his team was fifth and eliminated, despite being quicker than the British West Indies, runners-up in the other semi-final. Yerman, US Trials winner who had been ill in Rome, gave the USA a 3m lead over BWI’s Spence in the final, with Reske of Germany in fourth place. Kinder ran a superb leg for Germany, pulling them to within 3m of the USA, with South Africa a metre ahead of BWI. Glenn Davis ensured gold for the USA with his strong 45.31 leg, giving the USA a lead of almost 8m. With Davis – the 400m winner – on the anchor leg, victory was almost assured, but Kaufmann ran a blistering anchor leg of 44.86 in a valiant attempt to catch the USA. Davis ran away from the German in the last 100m after letting Kaufmann get to his shoulder on the final curve. Kerr ran 45.64 in splendid isolation in third place, ahead of South Africa’s Spence.
Tokyo, 21 Oct 1964
(Competitors: 68; Countries: 17; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Carr moved from initial position to anchor for the United States team as they set a new world record, followed closely by Great Britain and Northern Ireland as well as Trinidad and Tobago. All three teams were under the old world record time.

France also shuffled their lineup, moving Nelzy to third from first.

Place Nation Athletes Time
1 United States Ollan Cassell
Mike Larrabee
Ulis Williams
Henry Carr
3:00.7 WR
2 Great Britain Tim Graham
Adrian Metcalfe
John Cooper
Robbie Brightwell
3:01.6
3 Trinidad and Tobago Edwin Skinner
Kent Bernard
Edwin Roberts
Wendell Mottley
3:01.7
4 Jamaica Laurie Khan
Malcolm Spence
Melville Spence
George E. Kerr
3:02.3
5 Germany Jorg Juttner
Hans-Ulrich Schulz
Johannes Schmitt
Manfred Kinder
3:04.3
6 Poland Marian Filipiuk
Ireneusz Kluczek
Stanislaw Swatowski
Andrzej Badeński
3:05.3
7 Soviet Union Grigory Sverbetov
Victor Bychkov
Vasily Anisimov
Vadim Arkhipchuk
3:05.9
8 France Michel Hiblot
Bernard Martin
Germain Nelzy
Jean Pierre Boccardo
3:07.4
Showing good judgement, the USA picked the Olympic 200m Champion Henry Carr to run the anchor for them. He had run only the 200m in the US Trials, but had produced a 44.3 for the US team in 1963, and was generally considered the best 400m man in the world – though scheduling in 1964 was less kind to 200/400 doublers than in the current era. Great Britain were the fastest in the heats with 3:04.7, with France the slowest qualifier on 3:07.5. Tim Graham ran a storming opening leg for Britain, the fastest lap of his life – 45.9 – to lead Ollan Cassell and Edwin Skinner by a metre. Adrian Metcalfe went 5m clear of Larrabee by 600m, but the American then turned on the power and went 5m ahead by the changeover, with Bernard and Spence closing on the tiring Briton. Williams maintained the USA’s lead, though Ed Roberts caught him after 200m of the leg, and the second Spence twin (Mel) produced a good finish to pass Roberts and hand over 1m ahead of Trinidad and Britain. Mottley and Kerr charged after Carr, catching him momentarily with 200m to go, at which point Carr flowed away elegantly, and won by 8m. Behind him Brightwell ran a fine last 100m cutting down Kerr and then Mottley to take the silver medal.
Mexico City, 20 Oct 1968
(Competitors: 65; Countries: 16; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Place Nation Athletes Time
1  United States Vince Matthews
Ron Freeman
Larry James
Lee Evans
2:56,1 WR
2  Kenya Charles Asati
Munyoro Nyamau
Naftali Bon
Daniel Rudisha
2:59,6
3  West Germany Helmar Müller
Manfred Kinder
Gerhard Hennige
Martin Jellinghaus
3:00,5
4  Poland Stanisław Grędziński
Jan Balachowski
Jan Werner
Andrzej Badeński
3:00,5
5  United Kingdom Martin Winbolt-Lewis
Colin Campbell
David Hemery
John Sherwood
3:01,2
6  Trinidad and Tobago George Simon
Euric Bobb
Benedict Cayenne
Edwin Roberts
3:04,5
7  Italy Sergio Ottolina
Giacomo Puosi
Furio Fusi
Sergio Bello
3:04,6
8  France Jean-Claude Nallet
Jacques Carette
Gilles Bertould
Jean-Pierre Boccardo
3:07,5
With the slowest man on the United States squad a 44.4 man – appreciably faster than the best of any other team – the winner was never in doubt. The heats were notable for the USA’s 3:00.71, equalling the Olympic record, highlighted by a 43.4 leg by Freeman. Kenya ran 3:00.84 behind the USA, with Rudisha running 44.0 on the anchor leg. Cuba and Nigeria ran 3:05.28 and 3:05.78 respectively, but failed to make the final. Matthews was not only held by Asati on the first leg in the final, but headed as the little (1.76/65Kg) Kenyan gained 4m on his American rival, with the rest of the field more than 10m back. Freeman broke the race open on the second leg, handing over 12m clear of Kenya after a 43.2 leg, still one of the fastest ever splits 44 years later. James ran a fine solo 43.8, and the lead was now 30m, and Evans brought the team home in 2:56.16, altitude aided to be sure, but the longest lasting world record of the altitude affected Games. Behind them, Kenya finished as the first non-American team to run under three minutes.
Munich, 10 Sep 1972
(Competitors: 85; Countries: 21; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Rank Names Nationality Time
1st, gold medalist(s) Charles Asati, Munyoro Nyamau, Robert Ouko, Julius Sang Kenya 2:59.83
2nd, silver medalist(s) Martin Reynolds, Alan Pascoe, Dave Hemery, David Jenkins Great Britain 3:00.46
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Gilles Bertould, Daniel Velasques, Francis Kerbiriou, Jacques Carette France 3:00.65
4 Bernd Herrmann, Horst-Rüdiger Schlöske, Hermann Köhler, Karl Honz West Germany 3:00.88
5 Jan Werner, Jan Balachowski, Zbigniew Jaremski, Andrzej Badeński Poland 3:01.05
6 Stig Lönnqvist, Ari Salin, Ossi Karttunen, Markku Kukkoaho Finland 3:01.12
7 Erik Carlgren, Anders Faager, Kent Öhman, Ulf Rönner Sweden 3:02.57
8 Arthur Cooper, Pat Marshall, Charles Joseph, Edwin Roberts Trinidad and Tobago 3:03.58
With Matthews and Collet banned after the 400m victory ceremony, and John Smith unable to run through injury, the USA had to withdraw, leaving the way open for Kenya. After heats which found 3:03.83 for Jamaica not quick enough to qualify, Charles Asati got Kenya off to a great start in the final, as he had done in 1968. Leading from Poland by 3m after the first leg, Kenya dropped back to third as Schlöske ran an excellent 44.5 to take FRG more than 5m clear, with six teams bunched within 6m. The teams produced a concertina effect on the third leg resulting in seven teams spread over 6m at the final changeover, the fastest of the third legs being Charles Joseph’s 44.5 for Trinidad, the only team not in touch. Karl Honz set off for Germany as if he was planning to run 42 for his leg; he passed 200m in 20.1 with a growing 4m lead over Poland (Badeński 20.3 for his first 200), and Kenya (Sang 20.2), with Britain (Jenkins 20.4) a further 3m back. Not unexpectedly, Honz began to tire after 300m and Sang zipped past on his way to the fastest low altitude leg ever – 43.6 – leading Kenya home in 2:59.83. Behind him Jenkins went from fourth to second in the last 50m with Carette in his slipstream, as the British squad equalled the European record.
Montreal, 31 Jul 1976
(Competitors: 64; Countries: 16; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

  • Held on 31 July 1976. The final was run in a hard rain.
RANK NATION ATHLETES TIME
Gold medal with cup.svg  United States (USA) • Herman Frazier
• Benny Brown
• Fred Newhouse
• Maxie Parks
2:58.65
Silver medal with cup.svg  Poland (POL) • Ryszard Podlas
• Jan Werner
• Zbigniew Jaremski
• Jerzy Pietrzyk
3:01.43
Bronze medal with cup.svg  West Germany (FRG) • Franz-Peter Hofmeister
• Lothar Krieg
• Harald Schmid
• Bernd Herrmann
3:01.98
4.  Canada (CAN) • Ian Seale
• Don Domansky
• Leighton Hope
• Brian Saunders
3:02.64
5.  Jamaica (JAM) • Leighton Priestley
• Donald Quarrie
• Colin Bradford
• Seymour Newman
3:02.84
6.  Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) • Michael Solomon
• Horace Tuitt
• Joseph Coombs
• Charles Joseph
3:03.46
7.  Cuba (CUB) • Eddy Gutierrez
• Damaso Alfonso
• Carlos Alvarez
• Alberto Juantorena
3:03.81
8.  Finland (FIN) • Hannu Makela
• Ossi Karttunen
• Stig Lonnqvist
• Markku Kukkoaho
3:06.51
The only surprise of the heats was Britain’s failure to qualify, caused by Alan Pascoe having the baton accidentally knocked out of his hand by the Jamaican team just before the final changeover. Kenya had been lost to the boycott, so the USA were an even bigger favourite than before. Frazier led FRG, Cuba and Trinidad by 6m after the first leg of the final, and Brown maintained that lead as Polish veteran Werner ran a superb 44.0 to move Poland into second place. Newhouse removed any doubt as to whether the US would win by running a blistering 43.8 to give the Americans a lead of more than 20m, which Parks increased slightly to clock the best ever low-altitude time. Poland held off FRG for silver, as Jamaica’s 800m specialist Newman (43.8) ran the fastest anchor leg.
Moscow, 1 Aug 1980
(Competitors: 97; Countries: 24; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

  • Held on Friday 1 August 1980
RANK NATION FINAL TIME
Med 1.png  Soviet Union (URS) • Remigijus Valiulis
• Mikhail Linge
• Nikolay Chernetskiy
• Viktor Markin
3:01.08
Med 2.png  East Germany (GDR) • Klaus Thiele
• Andreas Knebel
• Frank Schaffer
• Volker Beck
3:01.26
Med 3.png  Italy (ITA) • Stefano Malinverni
• Mauro Zuliani
• Roberto Tozzi
• Pietro Mennea
3:04.54
4.  France (FRA) • Jacques Fellice
• Robert Froissart
• Didier Dubois
• Francis Demarthon
3:04.8
5.  Brazil (BRA) • Paulo Correia
• Antônio Dias Ferreira
• Agberto Guimarães
• Geraldo Pegado
3:05.9
6.  Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) • Joseph Coombs
• Charles Joseph
• Rafee Mohammed
• Mike Solomon
3:06.6
7.  Czechoslovakia (TCH) • Josef Lomický
• Dusan Malovec
• František Břečka
• Karel Kolář
3:07.0
8.  Great Britain (GBR) • Alan Bell
• Terry Whitehead
• Rod Milne
• Glen Cohen
DNF
With the United States, Kenya and FRG missing, the event was seriously undermined, and yet the race for gold – which would have been for silver at best with the missing teams included – was excellent. The Soviet team was fastest in the heats by two seconds, with 3:01.8. The USSR replaced Viktor Burakov with Markin for the final. It was only in 1984 that heat runners also won gold medals, so Burakov won only the honour of being on the team. Valiulis led on the first leg, just ahead of Thiele and Coombs, but Knebel took the lead at the finish of the staggers at the 500m mark. Linge closed on the GDR team, and the two handed over level. Behind them Trinidad was the closest team, just 6m back, until the third runner collided with Knebel, and the Trinidad team was never in the hunt thereafter. Up ahead Chernyetskiy and Schaffer ran level, and the two 400m gold medallists – Beck the hurdler, and Markin the flat winner – took over level. Markin took the lead after 100m, and held off Beck after both men tried to play a waiting game. Four years later a slightly over-the-hill Markin at full-blast ran 43.9 in the Soviet bloc’s substitute Games after they had boycotted the Los Angeles Olympics.
Los Angeles, 11 Aug 1984
(Competitors: 109; Countries: 25; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

  1.  United States (USA) (Sunder Nix, Ray Armstead, Alonzo Babers, Antonio McKay) 2:57.91
  2.  Great Britain (GBR) (Kriss Akabusi, Garry Cook, Todd Bennett, Phil Brown) 2:59.13
  3.  Nigeria (NGR) (Sunday Uti, Moses Ugbusien, Rotimi Peters, Innocent Egbunike) 2:59.32
  4.  Australia (AUS) (Bruce Frayne, Darren Clark, Gary Minihan, Rick Mitchell) 2:59.70
  5.  Italy (ITA) (Roberto Tozzi, Ernesto Nocco, Roberto Ribaud, Pietro Mennea) 3:01.44
  6.  Barbados (BAR) (Richard Louis, David Peltier, Clyde Edwards, Elvis Forde) 3:01.60 NR
  7.  Uganda (UGA) (John Goville, Moses Kyeswa, Peter Rwamuhanda, Mike Okot) 3:02.09 NR
  8.  Canada (CAN) (Michael Sokolowski, Doug Hinds, Brian Saunders, Tim Béthune) 3:02.82
After the fastest time in the heats (3:01.44) and semis (3:00.19), the USA were clearly ready for a very quick time. Sunder Nix ran a solid 45.59 opening leg, but found himself behind fast-starting Bruce Frayne and Sunday Uti, who finished quickly to take a slim lead for Nigeria. A poor exchange by Nigeria allowed Australia to take the lead, and 18 year-old Darren Clark ran away from the field as Ray Armstead zipped past Ugbisie to finish 3m behind Australia, and 2m ahead of Nigeria.The 400m winner Babers settled the race on the third leg with the fastest split of the day – 43.75 – to lead by 8m from Australia. Four metres back, Nigeria were caught by Britain after a 44.17 by Todd Bennett. Antonio McKay lost ground to Britain’s Phil Brown on the last leg, but it was academic as the USA won by 10m, with Britain going past Nigeria’s Egbunike with 20m to go.
Seoul, 1 Oct 1988
(Competitors: 99; Countries: 22; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

  • Held on Saturday October 1, 1988
RANK NATION FINAL TIME
Med 1.png  United States (USA) • Danny Everett
• Steve Lewis
• Kevin Robinzine
• Butch Reynolds
2:56.16 EWR
Med 2.png  Jamaica (JAM) • Howard Davis
• Devon Morris
• Winthrop Graham
• Bert Cameron
3:00.30
Med 3.png  West Germany (FRG) • Norbert Dobeleit
• Edgar Itt
• Jörg Vaihinger
• Ralf Lübke
3:00.56
4.  East Germany (GDR) • Jens Carlowitz
• Mathias Schersing
• Frank Möller
• Thomas Schönlebe
3:01.13
5.  Great Britain (GBR) • Brian Whittle
• Kriss Akabusi
• Todd Bennett
• Philip Brown
3:02.00
6.  Australia (AUS) • Robert Ballard
• Mark Garner
• Miles Murphy
• Darren Clark
3:02.49
7.  Nigeria (NGR) • Sunday Uti
• Moses Ugbusien
• Henry Amike
• Innocent Egbunike
3:02.50
8.  Kenya (KEN) • Tito Sawe
• Lucas Sang
• Paul Ereng
• Simeon Kipkemboi
3:04.69
With the three fastest men in the world, the question was not would the United States win, but how fast would they run ? Everett ran the fastest opening leg ever – 43.79 – to hand over the baton 9m ahead of GDR’s Carlowitz. The GDR had been the fastest team in the two preliminary rounds (3:00.60 in the semis), but found themselves nearly 20m down after two legs. Lewis had run 43.69, and passed to fourth-string Robinzine, who ran “only” 44.44 but still gained on the second placed team, now Jamaica, as the USA led by 30m. Reynolds ran a solo 43.74 to win by almost 40m as the USA tied its own world record from 1968. Behind them Cameron won his first Olympic medal in his final Olympic appearance.
Barcelona, 8 Aug 1992
(Competitors: 102; Countries: 24; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

  • Held on August 8, 1992
RANK NATION FINAL TIME
Med 1.png  United States (USA) • Andrew Valmon
• Quincy Watts
• Michael Johnson
• Steve Lewis
2:55.74 World Record Olympic Record
Med 2.png  Cuba (CUB) • Lázaro Martínez
• Héctor Herrera
• Norberto Téllez
• Roberto Hernández
2:59.51
Med 3.png  Great Britain (GBR) • Roger Black
• David Grindley
• Kriss Akabusi
• John Regis
2:59.73
4.  Brazil (BRA) • Robson da Silva
• Ediélson Rocha Tenório
• Sergio Matias de Menezes
• Sidney Telles de Souza
3:01.61
5.  Nigeria (NGR) • Udeme Ekpeyong
• Emmanuel Okoli
• Hassan Bosso
• Sunday Bada
3:01.71
6.  Italy (ITA) • Alessandro Aimar
• Marco Vaccari
• Fabio Grossi
• Andrea Nuti
3:02.18
7.  Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) • Alvin Daniel
• Patrick Delice
• Neil de Silva
• Ian Morris
3:03.31
 Kenya (KEN) • Samson Kitur
• Abednego Matilu
• Simeon Kipkemboi
• Simon Kemboi
DNF
Cuba (2:59.13) edged the USA (2:59.14) and Kenya (2:59.63) in the heats, but the Americans were expected to win easily, the only question mark being the health of Michael Johnson, not fully recovered from his stomach problems. Andrew Valmon ran a fine opening leg of 44.5 to give the USA a 4m lead over Britain, led off by Roger Black’s 44.9. Quincy Watts won the race on the second leg. The 400m winner sped through a 43.1 lap to lead Britain by nearly 20m. Michael Johnson maintained the USA lead without showing his real form, and Steve Lewis anchored with 43.4 to finally break the 2:56.16 world record set 24 years earlier. A long way behind them, Roberto Hernández edged past John Regis in the last 50m to win silver for Cuba.
Atlanta, 3 Aug 1996
(Competitors: 151; Countries: 35; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

RANK NATION ATHLETES FINAL LANE
Med 1.png  United States (USA) • Lamont Smith
• Alvin Harrison
• Derek Mills
• Anthuan Maybank
2:55.99 5
Med 2.png  Great Britain (GBR) • Iwan Thomas
• Jamie Baulch
• Mark Richardson
• Roger Black
2:56.60 6
Med 3.png  Jamaica (JAM) • Michael McDonald
• Roxbert Martin
• Gregory Haughton
• Davian Clarke
2:59.42 4
4.  Senegal (SEN) • Moustapha Diarra
• Aboubakry Dia
• Hachim Ndiaye
• Ibou Faye
3:00.64
(NR)
3
5.  Japan (JPN) • Shunji Karube
• Koji Ito
• Jun Osakada
• Shigekazu Omori
3:00.76 7
6.  Poland (POL) • Piotr Rysiukiewicz
• Tomasz Jędrusik
• Piotr Haczek
• Robert Maćkowiak
3:00.96 4
7.  Bahamas (BAH) • Carl Oliver
• Troy McIntosh
• Dennis Darling
• Timothy Munnings
3:02.71 2
8.  Kenya (KEN) • Samson Kitur
• Samson Yego
• Simon Kemboi
• Julius Chepkwony
DNS 1
With Butch Reynolds and Michael Johnson, the United States would have been unbeatable, but Reynolds failed to finish his 400m semifinal, and Johnson injured himself at the end of his fabulous 200m. After the fastest ever times for both heats (3:00.56) and semi-finals (2:57.87), the USA were still favourites ahead of Britain and Jamaica, but not considered invincible. Kenya had been medal contenders, but injuries prevented them from fielding a team for the final. For the first half of the final it was a battle between the top three teams, with Smith giving the USA a fine start in 44.62, some 3m clear of strong Thomas with Jamaica a further metre back. The USA still led by 4m after Harrison maintained a 4m lead – now over Jamaica, after a fine leg by Martin (43.81) who overtook Britain’s second man Baulch (44.19), a Welshman like Thomas. Jamaica lost any chance when Haughton fell while taking the baton and he did well to get up and run 45.87. Ahead of him, little (1.75/68Kg) Mills ran a fine 43.62 to maintain a 6m advantage ahead of Britain’s smooth Richardson. The individual 400m silver medallist Black made up 4m of the deficit on Maybank, and the two teams were locked together until 80m to go, when Maybank drew away, with both men running 43.87 on their anchor legs.
Sydney, 30 Sep 2000
(Competitors: 153; Countries: 34; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Final
Date: Friday 29 September 2000
Place Nation Athletes Lane Reaction Time Record
1 Nigeria Clement Chukwu, Jude Monye,
Sunday Bada, Enefiok Udo-Obong
4 0.541 s 2:58.68 s AR
2 Jamaica Michael Blackwood, Gregory Haughton,
Christopher Williams, Danny McFarlane
6 0.382 s 2:58.78 SB
3 Bahamas Avard Moncur, Troy McIntosh,
Carl Oliver, Chris Brown
1 0.260 s 2:59.23  
4 France Emmanuel Front, Marc Foucan,
Ibrahima Wade, Marc Raquil
2 0.252s 3:01.02 SB
5 Great Britain Jared Deacon, Daniel Caines,
Iwan Thomas, Jamie Baulch
3 0.252 s 3:01.22 SB
6 Poland Piotr Rysiukiewicz, Robert Maćkowiak,
Piotr Długosielski, Piotr Haczek
8 0.203s 3:03.22  
7 Australia Brad Jamieson, Blair Young,
Patrick Dwyer, Michael Hazel
7 0.177 s 3:03.91  
DQ United States Alvin Harrison, Antonio Pettigrew,
Calvin Harrison, Michael Johnson
5   2:56.35  
Alvin Harrison led off the US team in the final, and held a 3m advantage over the Bahamas’ Moncur at the change-over. Pettigrew (44.17) and Calvin Harrison (Alvin’s twin, 43.53) ran the fastest second and third legs, handing over to Johnson with 20m to spare. Johnson ran a controlled leg of 44.29 – the fastest anchor, to give the USA a comprehensive victory and collect his fifth Olympic gold. Nigeria moved from 4th to second in the last 50m. Jerome Young also collected a gold medal, as he was part of the quartets which ran in the heats and semi-finals. In August 2003, documents passed to the IOC by the US Olympic Committee revealed that Young had tested positive for a steroid in June 1999. He had then been cleared, in secret, by US Track and Field. In February 2004, documents relating to the case were supplied to the IAAF and the facts were then presented to the Court of Arbitration of Sport. Four months later, the CAS judged that the Doping Appeal Board of USATF had reached an erroneous decision when exonerating Young. He did indeed commit a doping offence on June 26, 1999 and should then have been suspended for two years rather than competing throughout that period. In July 2004, the IAAF confirmed the annulment of Young’s performances in 1999-2001, with the consequence that the United States were theoretically disqualified from heat, semi-final and final of the 4x400m relay at the Sydney Games. However, the US Olympic Committee filed an appeal to the Court of Aribtration for Sport challenging the Olympic disqualification on behalf of the five relay squad members apart from Young, who of course did not compete in the final. In July 2005 the CAS panel decided that on the basis of the IAAF Rules applicable at the time of the Sydney Games, the relay results should not be amended and that only Young of the US team should be stripped of his gold medal. At the time, the rules did not specify that entire teams should be disqualified if one member has committed a doping violation. At the trial of his (and Young’s) former coach Trevor Graham in May 2007, Pettigrew confessed to doping violations for a period of six years between 1997 and 2003. The IAAF annulled all of his results in that perios and, in August 2008, the IOC stripped the USA of the title, though (as at May 31, 2012) they have yet to officially upgrade Nigeria and the other teams in the final. Tragically, one of the Nigerian team, Sunday Bada, passed away in December 2011 without ever receiving his Olympic gold. It should be noted that two members of the original winning team – the Harrison twins – were each found guilty of doping offences after Sydney. Meanwhile Young had begun a life suspension from the sport after comitting a further doping violation in June 2004.
Athens, 28 Aug 2004
(Competitors 68; Countries: 16; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Rank Lane Nation Competitors Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 United States Otis Harris, Derrick Brew, Jeremy Wariner, Darold Williamson 2:55.91 SB
2nd, silver medalist(s) 1 Australia John Steffensen, Mark Ormrod, Patrick Dwyer, Clinton Hill 3:00.60 SB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 3 Nigeria James Godday, Musa Audu, Saul Weigopwa, Enefiok Udo-Obong 3:00.90 SB
4 6 Japan Yuki Yamaguchi, Jun Osakada, Tomohiro Ito, Mitsuhiro Sato 3:00.99 SB
5 5 Great Britain Timothy Benjamin, Sean Baldock, Malachi Davis, Matthew Elias 3:01.07 SB
6 7 Bahamas Nathaniel McKinney, Aaron Cleare, Andrae Williams, Christopher Brown 3:01.88  
7 8 Germany Ingo Schultz, Kamghe Gaba, Ruwen Faller, Bastian Swillims 3:02.22  
8 2 Botswana Johnson Kubisa, California Molefe, Gaolesiela Salang, Kagiso Kilego 3:02.49 SB
The USA won their heat in 2:59.30, which featured an anchor of 44.14 by Darold Williamson. They were more than two seconds faster than any other team. The final was not as close; the US won by the biggest margin in Olympic history – 4.69 – exceeding the 1948 gap of 4.4. With all three medalists from the individual event, this margin was no great surprise. Individual bronze winner Harris began the US assault with 44.5, and was followed by Britain’s Tim Benjamin (45.3), closely chased by Germany, Nigeria and Japan. Derrick Brew then ran 43.6, and the US lead was extended to 2.55, as none of the other second leg runners was able to duck below 45.0. College teammates Wariner and Williamson then ran in the order followed by Baylor University, with Wariner clocked in 43.89, and Williamson 43.83. On the anchor leg Hill sprung from a four-way battle to claim an unexpected silver for Australia while Udo-Obong again anchored Nigeria to a medal.
Beijing, 23 Aug 2008
(Competitors: 70; Countries: 16; Finalists: 32/8)

Final

Rank Lane Nation Competitors Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) 7 United States LaShawn Merritt, Angelo Taylor, David Neville, Jeremy Wariner 2:55.39 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 5 Bahamas Andretti Bain, Michael Mathieu, Andrae Williams, Chris Brown 2:58.03 SB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 4 Russia Maksim Dyldin, Vladislav Frolov, Anton Kokorin, Denis Alexeev 2:58.06 NR
4 6 Great Britain Andrew Steele, Robert Tobin, Michael Bingham, Martyn Rooney 2:58.81 SB
5 8 Belgium Kévin Borlée, Jonathan Borlée, Cédric Van Branteghem, Arnaud Ghislain 2:59.37 NR
6 2 Australia Sean Wroe, John Steffensen, Clinton Hill, Joel Milburn 3:00.02 SB
7 3 Poland Rafał Wieruszewski, Piotr Klimczak, Piotr Kędzia, Marek Plawgo 3:00.32 SB
8 9 Jamaica Michael Blackwood, Ricardo Chambers, Sanjay Ayre, Lanceford Spence 3:01.45
As in 2004, the USA had the three medallists on their squad, together with hurdles winner Taylor. All qualifying teams ran quicker than 3:01, with Britain recording the fastest time of the heats (2:59.33). Individual champion Merritt sent the USA into a 10m lead with his leg estimated at 44.4. Taylor maintained stayed ahead with an excellent 43.7, but was matched by Jonathan Borlée. Belgium were 8m clear of the Bahamas, with Jamaica and Russia close behind. Neville gained ground for the USA as Belgium slipped three metres further back. The Bahamas were now third after Williams’s fine 44.02. Wariner, wanting to make up for his poor run in the individual final, blasted the anchor in 43.18 – the second fastest leg in Olympic history (after Quincy Watts’s 43.1 in 1992), and the US won by over 25m with the second fastest legal time ever. Behind them Brown just held off Russia, for whom Alekseyev ran a sensational 43.56 (this from a man with a lifetime best of 45.35). The Russians were so unexpecting of a place on the podium that they had to borrow the ceremonial tracksuits worn earlier by their triumphant compatriots in the women’s 4x100m relay. Men's 4 x 400 Metres Relay, continued Should the teams finishing behind the disqualified USA in 2000 final be all upgraded by the IOC, then the following statistics are correct: Result 1, Nigeria 2:58.68; 2, Jamaica 2:58.78; 3, Bahamas 2:59.23; 4, France 3:01.02; 5, Great Britain 3:01.22; 6, Poland 3:03.22; 7, Australia 3:03.91; dq, United States (2:56.35)
London, 10 Aug 2012
(Athletes 70; Countries 16; Finalists 9)

Final

Rank Lane Nation Competitors Time Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) 4 Bahamas Chris Brown, Demetrius Pinder, Michael Mathieu, Ramon Miller 2:56.72 WL, NR
2nd, silver medalist(s) 7 United States Bryshon Nellum, Joshua Mance, Tony McQuay, Angelo Taylor 2:57.05 SB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) 5 Trinidad and Tobago Lalonde Gordon, Jarrin Solomon, Ade Alleyne-Forte, Deon Lendore 2:59.40 NR
4 6 Great Britain Conrad Williams, Jack Green, Dai Greene, Martyn Rooney 2:59.53 SB
5 2 Russia Maksim Dyldin, Denis Alekseyev, Vladimir Krasnov, Pavel Trenikhin 3:00.09  
6 8 Belgium Kevin Borlée, Antoine Gillet, Jonathan Borlée, Michael Bultheel 3:01.83  
7 3 Venezuela Arturo Ramirez, Alberto Aguilar, Albert Bravo, Omar Longart 3:02.18  
8 1 South Africa Shaun de Jager, Willem de Beer, Louis van Zyl, Oscar Pistorius 3:03.46 SB
  9 Cuba William Collazo, Raidel Acea, Orestes Rodriguez, Omar Cisneros   DNF

Note: South Africa was allowed to continue as the ninth finalists on appeal. Louis van Zyl replaced the injured Ofentse Mogawane.

Trinidad and Tobago won the first heat in 3:00.28 from Britain and Cuba. Kenya were disqualified after Vincent Mumo fell on leg two and
brought down South Africa’s Ofentse Mogawane. The South Africans didn’t finish, but were advanced to the final where nine lanes would be
used. Yet more drama came in the second heat. Manteo Mitchell, running the opening leg for the USA, broke his fibula in mid-race. "As soon as I took the first step past the 200m mark I felt it break. I heard it. I even put out a little war cry but the crowd was so loud you couldn't
hear it. I wanted to just lie down.” Instead, Mitchell completed his lap in 45.9, and the US went on to clock 2:58.87, the same time as the winner, the Bahamas. The fastest split of 43.6 came from the USA’s McQuay.
The US replaced Mitchell with 400m hurdler Angelo Taylor for the final, as injuries prevented the appearance of previous Olympic winners
LaShawn Merritt and Jeremy Wariner. A determined Brown got the Bahamas into the lead on the opening leg with 44.8, just ahead of Trinidad (Gordon 44.9) and the USA (Nellum 45.0). Pinder (43.6) went clear for the Bahamas after 500m, and Mance (43.8) for the USA managed
to get within a metre at halfway. McQuay again showed his expertise with the baton, cruising through his 400 in 43.41 to open up a four metre lead. Taylor held off Miller until 50m remained, when the Bahamian went past to win the first-ever male gold medals for their country. “Waiting for the race to finish was the longest two minutes of my life,” remarked Brown, captain of the Bahamian “Golden Knights
Rio de Janeiro, 20 Aug 2016
(Athletes 69; Countries 16; Finalists 32/8)

Final

Rank Lane Nation Competitors Time Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) 5  United States Arman Hall, Tony McQuay, Gil Roberts, LaShawn Merritt 2:57.30 WL
2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3  Jamaica Peter Matthews, Nathon Allen, Fitzroy Dunkley, Javon Francis 2:58.16 SB
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) 6  Bahamas Alonzo Russell, Michael Mathieu, Steven Gardiner, Chris Brown 2:58.49 SB
4 4  Belgium Julien Watrin, Jonathan Borlée, Dylan Borlée, Kevin Borlée 2:58.52 NR
5 7  Botswana Isaac Makwala, Karabo Sibanda, Onkabetse Nkobolo, Leaname Maotoanong 2:59.06 NR
6 8  Cuba William Collazo, Adrian Chacón, Osmaidel Pellicier, Yoandys Lescay 2:59.53 SB
7 2  Poland Łukasz Krawczuk, Michał Pietrzak, Jakub Krzewina, Rafał Omelko 3:00.50  
8 1  Brazil Pedro Luiz de Oliveira, Alexander Russo, Peterson dos Santos, Hugo de Sousa 3:03.28  

The Bahamas entered as the defending Olympic champions while United States had won both the 2013 and 2015 World Championships since then. Louisiana State University held the world leading time of 3:00.38 minutes prior to the event. The American college team was anchored by Fitzroy Dunkley who ran for Jamaica here. Trinidad and Tobago, medallists at the both last Olympics and World Championships, were the next strongest team. Other teams entering with fast quartets were Jamaica, Great Britain and 2016 European champions Belgium.

As in 2012, the heats produced some drama. During the first handoff, in lanes, Trinidad and Tobago leadoff leg, Jarrin Solomon stepped inside of the lane line. He had already let go of the baton to Lalonde Gordon but the team was disqualified. In the second semi-final both Great Britain and India were disqualified for starting their leg with a foot outside of the passing zone.

The final began with Botswana's Isaac Makwala, the seventh fastest man in history and Jamaica's Peter Matthews taking it out hard. Matthews had passed Belgium's Julien Watrin at the head of the stretch, but Watrin pulled it back as Matthews slowed. Botswana made the handoff first. USA's Arman Hall also pulled back some ground from Matthews as USA exchanged even with Jamaica. Tony McQuay ran the turn hard to get the jump on Botswana's fifth place open sprinter, 18 year old Karabo Sibanda at the break. Michael Mathieu also put Bahamas ahead of Jamaica's Nathon Allen who was in a battle with Jonathan Borlée, the first of three successive Borlée brothers for Belgium.

Coming off the turn, Sibanda put the move on McQuay, putting Botswana into the lead, 5 metres back, Allen put the same move on Mathieu to put Jamaica into third. Because USA had the lead at the half way mark of the lap, Sibanda had to move back out to lane 2 to find his teammate Onkabetse Nkobolo. McQuay used the opening to move back even with Sibanda. After receiving the handoff Nkobolo ran into the back of American Gil Roberts who was still in the process of receiving the baton, Nkobolo lost all forward momentum and Roberts gained the edge coming out of the handoff. A meter down, Nkobolo stuck behind Roberts as if there was a rope between them. Behind them, Jamaica's Fitzroy Dunkley was closing the gap. Coming off the turn, unimpeded, Roberts stumbled and lost his balance, throwing his baton hand high in the air to right himself and avert a disaster by stepping inside of the curb. Dunkley slowed down the stretch, Steven Gardiner pulling Bahamas back even.

The final handoff, Roberts to bronze medalist LaShawn Merritt, Botswana to Leaname Maotoanong was clean. Bahamas' "Fireman" Chris Brown gained the edge over Jamaica's Javon Francis on their handoff three metres up on the Borlée brothers. Down the backstretch and into the final turn, Maotoanong stayed consistently about 2 metres behind Merritt as Brown, Francis and Kevin Borlée crept closer. Francis went for the pass during the turn but Brown held him off to the straightaway. Merritt began to pull away from Maotoanong. Running in lane 2, Francis got past Brown then squeezed him out of running space as he passed Maotoanong. Brown had to move into lane 2. Getting passed, Maotoanong began to struggle, flailing his arms but running backward. Brown went by on the outside, Borlée went by on the inside. Merritt crossed the finish line seven metres up on Francis to give America gold over Jamaica's silver. Three more metres back, Borlée was making a mighty rush at Brown, dipping and diving too late to get the bronze as Bahamas held on while Borlée crashed to the track.

Belgium and Botswana both set national records in the heats and finals. McQuay's leg was timed as 43.2, tied for the fourth fastest relay splits in history.

The medals for the competition were presented by Angela Ruggiero, IOC member, and the gifts were presented by Alberto Juantorena, IAAF Council Member.

4 × 400 metres Relay (Men's) Progression of Olympic Record

  
4 x 400 metres relay
3.19.0   h1     Seedhouse, Soutter, Henley, Nicol   GBR Stockholm 1912
3.16.6   1   WR Sheppard, Lindberg, Meredith, Reidpath   USA Stockholm 1912
3.16.0*   1   WR Cochran, Stevenson, MacDonald, Helffrich   USA Paris 1924
3.14.2   1   WR Baird, Spencer, Alderman, Barbuti   USA Amsterdam 1928
3.11.8   s1   WR Fuqua, Ablowich, Warner, Carr   USA Los Angeles 1932
3.08.2   1   WR Fuqua, Ablowich, Warner, Carr   USA Los Angeles 1932
3.03.9 3.04.04 1   WR Wint, Laing, McKenley, Rhoden   JAM Helsinki 1952
3.02.2 3.02.37 1   WR Yerman, Young, Davis, Davis   USA Rome 1960
3.00.7   1   WR Cassell, Larrabee, Williams, Carr   USA Tokyo 1964
3.00.7A 3.00.71A h1   =WR Matthews, Freeman, James, Evans   USA Mexico City 1968
2.56.1A 2.56.16A     WR Matthews, Freeman, James, Evans   USA Mexico City 1968
  2.56.16 1   =WR Everett, Lewis, Robinzine, Reynolds   USA Seoul 1988
  2.55.74 1   WR Valmon, Watts, Johnson, Lewis   USA Barcelona 1992
  2.55.39 1   WR Merritt, Neville, Taylor, Wariner   USA Beijing 2008
*Track 500 metres in circumference.
Low-Altitude Progression
3.00.7   1   WR Cassell, Larrabee, Williams, Carr   USA Tokyo 1964
  2.59.83 1     Asati, Nyamau, Ouko, Sang   KEN Munich 1972
  2.59.52 s1     Frazier, Brown, Newhouse, Parks   USA Montreal 1976
  2.58.66 1     Frazier, Brown, Newhouse, Parks   USA Montreal 1976
  2.57.91 1     Nix, Armstead, Babers, McKay   USA Los Angeles 1984
  2.56.16 1   =WR Everett, Lewis, Robinzine, Reynolds   USA Seoul 1988
  2.55.74 1   WR Valmon, Watts, Johnson, Lewis   USA Barcelona 1992
  2.55.39 1   WR Merritt, Neville, Taylor, Wariner   USA Beijing 2008
Automatic Timing Progression
  3.12.13 s1     Wint, Laing, McKenley, Rhoden   JAM Helsinki 1952
  3.11.67 s2     Matson, Cole, Moore, Whitfield   USA Helsinki 1952
  3.10.57 s3     Geister, Steines, Ulzheimer, Haas   GER Helsinki 1952
  3.04.04 1     Wint, Laing, McKenley, Rhoden   JAM Helsinki 1952
  3.02.37 1   WRa Yerman, Young, Davis, Davis   USA Rome 1960
  3.00.71A h1   WRa Matthews, Freeman, James, Evans   USA Mexico City 1968
  2.56.16A 1   WRa Matthews, Freeman, James, Evans   USA Mexico City 1968
  2.56.16 1   =WR Everett, Lewis, Robinzine, Reynolds   USA Seoul 1988
  2.55.74 1   WR Valmon, Watts, Johnson, Lewis   USA Barcelona 1992
  2.55.39 1   WR Merritt, Neville, Taylor, Wariner   USA Beijing 2008
Low-Altitude Automatic Timing Progression
  3.02.37 1   WR Yerman, Young, Davis, Davis   USA Rome 1960
  2.59.83 1     Asati, Nyamau, Ouko, Sang   KEN Munich 1972
  2.59.52 s1     Frazier, Brown, Newhouse, Parks   USA Montreal 1976
  2.58.66 1     Frazier, Brown, Newhouse, Parks   USA Montreal 1976
  2.57.91 1     Nix, Armstead, Babers, McKay   USA Los Angeles 1984
  2.56.16 1   =WR Everett, Lewis, Robinzine, Reynolds   USA Seoul 1988
  2.55.74 1   WR Valmon, Watts, Johnson, Lewis   USA Barcelona 1992
  2.55.39 1   WR Merritt, Neville, Taylor, Wariner   USA Beijing 2008

4 × 400 metres Relay (Men's) 200 All time Best Perfomances

  usa2008.jpg
    4 x 400 m              
1 2.55.39   LaShawn Merritt 44.35, Angelo Taylor 43.70, David Neville 44.16, Jeremy Wariner 43.18 United States USA 1 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
2 2.55.74   Andrew Valmon, Quincy Watts, Michael Johnson, Steve Lewis United States USA 1 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
3 2.55.91   Otis Harris, Derrick Brew, Jeremy Wariner 43.98, Darold Williamson 43.83 United States USA 1 Final Athens 28 August 2004
4 2.55.99   LaMont Smith, Alvin Harrison DOM, Derek Mills, Anthuan Maybank United States USA 1 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
5 2.56.16   Vince Matthews 45.0, Ron Freeman 43.2, Larry James 43.8, Lee Evans 44.1 United States USA 1 Final Mexico 20 October 1968
6 2.56.16   Danny Everett, Steve Lewis, Kevin Robinzine, Butch Reynolds United States USA 1 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
7 2.56.60   Iwan Thomas, Jamie Baulch, Mark Richardson, Roger Black Great Britain GBR 2 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
8 2.56.72   Chris Brown, Demetrius Pinder, Michael Mathieu, Ramon Miller Bahamas BAH 1 Final London 10 August 2012
9 2.57.05   Bryshon Nellum, Josh Mance, Tony McQuay, Angelo Taylor United States USA 2 Final London 10 August 2012
10 2.57.30   Arman Hall, Tony McQuay, Gil Roberts, LaShawn Merritt   USA 1 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
11 2.57.87   LaMont Smith, Jason Rouser, Derek Mills, Anthuan Maybank United States USA 1 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
12 2.57.91   Sunder Nix, Ray Armstead, Alonzo Babers, Antonio McKay United States USA 1 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
13 2.58.03   Andretti Bain 45.92, Michael Mathieu 44.04, Andrae Williams 44.02, Chris Brown 44.05 Bahamas BAH 2 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
14 2.58.06   Maksim Dyldin 45.52, Vladislav Frolov 44.64, Anton Kokorin 44.34, Denis Alekseyev 43.56 Russia RUS 3 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
15 2.58.16   Peter Matthews, Nathon Allen, Fitzroy Dunkley, Javon Francis   JAM 2 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
16 2.58.29   Rusheen McDonald, Peter Matthews, Nathon Allen, Javon Francis   JAM 1 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
17 2.58.38   Arman Hall, Tony McQuay, Kyle Clemons, David Verburg   USA 2 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
18 2.58.42   Michael McDonald, Dennis Blake, Greg Haughton, Roxbert Martin Jamaica JAM 2 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
19 2.58.49   Alonzo Russell, Michael Mathieu, Steven Gardiner, Chris Brown   BAH 3 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
20 2.58.52   Julien Watrin, Jonathan Borlée, Dylan Borlée, Kevin Borlée   BEL 4 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
21 2.58.65   Herman Frazier, Benny Brown, Fred Newhouse, Maxie Parks United States USA 1 Final Montreal 31 July 1976
22 2.58.68   Clement Chukwu, Jude Monye 44.49, Jude Monye, Sunday Bada 44.70, Sunday Bada, Enefiok Udo-Obong 44.31, Enefiok Udo-Obong Nigeria NGR 1 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
23 2.58.78   Michael Blackwood, Greg Haughton 44.29, Greg Haughton, Chris Williams 44.73, Chris Williams, Danny McFarlane 44.62, Danny McFarlane Jamaica JAM 2 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
24 2.58.81   Andrew Steele 45.69, Robert Tobin 44.78, Michael Bingham 44.61, Martyn Rooney 43.73 Great Britain GBR 4 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
25 2.58.84   Sanjay Ayre JAM, Greg Haughton JAM, Danny McFarlane JAM, Michael Blackwood JAM Jamaica JAM 1 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
26 2.58.87   Ramon Miller, Demetrius Pinder, Michael Mathieu, Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 1 Heat 2 London 9 August 2012
27 2.58.87   Manteo Mitchell, Josh Mance, Tony McQuay, Bryshon Nellum United States USA 2 Heat 2 London 9 August 2012
28 2.59.02   Avard Moncur BAH, Troy McIntosh BAH, Carl Oliver BAH, Chris Brown BAH Bahamas BAH 2 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
29 2.59.06   Isaac Makwala, Karabo Sibanda, Onkabetse Nkobolo, Gaone Maotoanong   BOT 5 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
30 2.59.13   Lázaro Martínez, Héctor Herrera, Norberto Téllez, Roberto Hernández Cuba CUB 1 Heat 2 Barcelona 7 August 1992
31 2.59.13   Kriss Akabusi, Garry Cook, Todd Bennett, Phil Brown Great Britain GBR 2 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
32 2.59.14   Darnell Hall, Michael Johnson, Chip Jenkins, Quincy Watts United States USA 2 Heat 2 Barcelona 7 August 1992
33 2.59.23   Avard Moncur, Troy McIntosh 44.23, Troy McIntosh, Carl Oliver 44.83, Carl Oliver, Chris Brown 45.52, Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 3 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
34 2.59.25   Julien Watrin, Jonathan Borlée, Dylan Borlée, Kevin Borlée   BEL 1 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
35 2.59.30   Kelly Willie, Derrick Brew, Andrew Rock, Darold Williamson United States USA 1 Heat 2 Athens 27 August 2004
36 2.59.32   Sunday Uti, Moses Ugbisie, Rotimi Peters, Innocent Egbunike Nigeria NGR 3 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
37 2.59.33   Andrew Steele, Robert Tobin, Michael Bingham, Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 1 Heat 2 Beijing 22 August 2008
38 2.59.35   Isaac Makwala, Karabo Sibanda, Onkabetse Nkobolo, Gaone Maotoanong   BOT 3 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
39 2.59.37   Kevin Borlée 45.43, Jonathan Borlée 43.62, Cédric Van Branteghem 44.44, Arnaud Ghislain 45.88 Belgium BEL 5 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
40 2.59.40   Lalonde Gordon, Jarrin Solomon, Ade Alleyne-Forte, Deon Lendore Trinidad and Tobago TTO 3 Final London 10 August 2012
41 2.59.42   Michael McDonald, Roxbert Martin, Greg Haughton, Davian Clarke Jamaica JAM 3 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
42 2.59.51   Lázaro Martínez, Héctor Herrera, Norberto Téllez, Roberto Hernández Cuba CUB 2 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
43 2.59.52   Herman Frazier, Benny Brown, Fred Newhouse, Maxie Parks United States USA 1 Heat 1 Montreal 30 July 1976
44 2.59.53   Conrad Williams, Jack Green, Dai Greene, Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 4 Final London 10 August 2012
45 2.59.53   William Collazo, Adrián Chacón, Osmaidel Pellicier, Yoandys Lescay   CUB 6 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
46 2.59.58   Łukasz Krawczuk, Michał Pietrzak, Jakub Krzewina, Rafał Omelko   POL 4 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
47 2.59.63   David Kitur, Samson Kitur, Simon Kipkemboi, Simon Kemboi Kenya KEN 3 Heat 2 Barcelona 7 August 1992
48 2.59.64   Charles Asati 44.6, Munyoro Nyamau 45.2, Naftali Bon 45.2, Daniel Rudisha 44.6 Kenya KEN 2 Final Mexico 20 October 1968
49 2.59.64   Alonzo Russell, Chris Brown, Steven Gardiner, Stephen Newbold   BAH 2 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
50 2.59.70   Bruce Frayne, Darren Clark, Rick Mitchell Australia AUS 4 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
51 2.59.73   Roger Black, David Grindley, Kriss Akabusi, John Regis Great Britain GBR 3 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
52 2.59.83   Charles Asati, Hezekiah Nyamau, Robert Ouko, Julius Sang Kenya KEN 1 Final Munich 10 September 1972
53 2.59.88   Michael Mathieu, Avard Moncur, Ramon Miller, Andrae Williams Bahamas BAH 2 Heat 2 Beijing 22 August 2008
54 2.59.98   David Neville, Kerron Clement, Reggie Witherspoon, Angelo Taylor United States USA 1 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
55 3.00.02   Sean Wroe 46.07, John Steffensen 45.26, Clinton Hill 44.41, Joel Milburn 44.28 Australia AUS 6 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
56 3.00.09   Michael Blackwood, Allodin Fothergill, Sanjay Ayre, Ricardo Chambers Jamaica JAM 3 Heat 2 Beijing 22 August 2008
57 3.00.09   Maksim Dyldin, Denis Alekseyev, Vladimir Krasnov, Pavel Trenikhin Russia RUS 5 Final London 10 August 2012
58 3.00.14   Maksim Dyldin, Vladislav Frolov, Anton Kokorin, Denis Alekseyev Russia RUS 2 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
59 3.00.16   William Collazo, Adrián Chacón, Osmaidel Pellicier, Yoandys Lescay   CUB 3 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
60 3.00.19   Sunder Nix, Walter McCoy, Willie Smith NAM, Antonio McKay United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Los Angeles 10 August 1984
61 3.00.30   Howard Davis, Devon Morris, Winthrop Graham, Bert Cameron Jamaica JAM 2 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
62 3.00.32   Rafał Wieruszewski 46.02, Piotr Klimczak 44.54, Piotr Kędzia 45.10, Marek Plawgo 44.66 Poland POL 7 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
63 3.00.38   Lalonde Gordon, Jarrin Solomon, Ade Alleyne-Forte, Deon Lendore Trinidad and Tobago TTO 1 Heat 1 London 9 August 2012
64 3.00.38   Nigel Levine, Conrad Williams, Jack Green, Martyn Rooney Great Britain GBR 2 Heat 1 London 9 August 2012
65 3.00.39   Udeme Ekpeyong, Emmanuel Okoli CAN, Hassan Bosso, Sunday Bada Nigeria NGR 4 Heat 2 Barcelona 7 August 1992
66 3.00.43   Pedro Luis de Oliveira, Alexander Ruso, Peterson dos Santos, Hugo Souza   BRA 4 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
67 3.00.46   Martin Reynolds, Alan Pascoe, David Hemery, David Jenkins Great Britain GBR 2 Final Munich 10 September 1972
68 3.00.50   Łukasz Krawczuk, Michał Pietrzak, Jakub Krzewina, Rafał Omelko   POL 7 Final Rio de Janeiro 20 August 2016
69 3.00.55   William Collazo, Raidel Acea, Orestes Rodríguez, Omar Cisneros Cuba CUB 3 Heat 1 London 9 August 2012
70 3.00.56   LaMont Smith, Jason Rouser, Derek Mills, Anthuan Maybank United States USA 1 Heat 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
71 3.00.56   Norbert Dobeleit GER, Edgar Itt GER, Jörg Vaihinger GER, Ralf Lübke GER West Germany FRG 3 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
72 3.00.57   Helmar Müller 46.2, Manfred Kinder 44.8, Gerhard Hennige 44.7, Martin Jellinghaus 44.8 West Germany FRG 3 Final Mexico 20 October 1968
73 3.00.58   Stanisław Gredziński 46.8, Jan Balachowski 44.7, Jan Werner 44.5, Andrzej Badeński 44.5 Poland POL 4 Final Mexico 20 October 1968
74 3.00.60   Jens Carlowitz GER, Frank Möller GER, Mathias Schersing GER, Thomas Schönlebe GER East Germany GDR 1 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
75 3.00.60   John Steffensen 46.12, Mark Ormrod 44.76, Pat Dwyer 45.11, Clinton Hill 44.61 Australia AUS 2 Final Athens 28 August 2004
76 3.00.64   Emmanuel Front FRA, Marc Foucan FRA, Ibrahima Wade FRA, Marc Raquil FRA France FRA 3 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
77 3.00.64   Moustapha Diarra, Aboubakry Dia, Hachim Ndiaye, Ibou Faye Senegal SEN 4 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
78 3.00.65   Gilles Bertould, Roger Velasquez, Francis Kerbiriou, Jacques Carette France FRA 3 Final Munich 10 September 1972
79 3.00.66   Piotr Rysiukiewicz POL, Piotr Haczek POL, Piotr Długosielski POL, Robert Maćkowiak POL Poland POL 4 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
80 3.00.66   Norbert Dobeleit GER, Mark Henrich GER, Jörg Vaihinger GER, Ralf Lübke GER West Germany FRG 2 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
81 3.00.67   Cédric Van Branteghem, Jonathan Borlée, Arnaud Ghislain, Kevin Borlée Belgium BEL 3 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
82 3.00.68   Joel Milburn, Mark Ormrod, John Steffensen, Clinton Hill Australia AUS 4 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
83 3.00.7   Ollan Cassell 46.0, Mike Larrabee 44.8, Ulis Williams 45.4, Henry Carr44.5 United States USA 1 Final Tokyo 21 October 1964
84 3.00.71     United States USA 1 Round One Heat One Mexico 19 October 1968
85 3.00.74   Marek Plawgo, Piotr Klimczak, Piotr Kędzia, Rafał Wieruszewski Poland POL 5 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
86 3.00.76   Shunji Karube, Koji Ito, Jun Osakada, Shigekazu Omori Japan JPN 5 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
87 3.00.82   Mame-Ibra Anne, Teddy Venel, Mamadou Kasse Hann, Thomas Jordier   FRA 5 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
88 3.00.84     Kenya KEN 2 Round One Heat One Mexico 19 October 1968
89 3.00.88   Bernd Herrmann GER, Horst-Rüdiger Schlöske GER, Hermann Köhler GER, Karl Honz GER West Germany FRG 4 Final Munich 10 September 1972
90 3.00.90   Godday James, Musa Audu, Saul Welgopwa 44.84, Enefiok Udo-Obong 45.23 Nigeria NGR 3 Final Athens 28 August 2004
91 3.00.94   Trevor Graham, Devon Morris, Bert Cameron, Howard Davis Jamaica JAM 3 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
92 3.00.96   Piotr Rysiukiewicz, Tomasz Jedrusik, Piotr Haczek, Robert Maćkowiak Poland POL 6 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
93 3.00.99   Yuki Yamaguchi, Jun Osakada, Tomohiro Ito 45.01, Mitsuhiro Sato 45.33 Japan JPN 4 Final Athens 28 August 2004
94 3.01.02   Emmanuel Front, Marc Foucan 44.92, Marc Foucan, Ibrahima Wade 44.46, Ibrahima Wade, Marc Raquil 45.42, Marc Raquil France FRA 4 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
95 3.01.05   Alvin Daniel, Patrick Delice, Neil de Silva, Ian Morris Trinidad and Tobago TTO 1 Heat 1 Barcelona 7 August 1992
96 3.01.05   Jan Werner, Jan Balachowski, Zbigniew Jaremski, Andrzej Badenski Poland POL 5 Final Munich 10 September 1972
97 3.01.06   Clement Chukwu, Jude Monye, Enefiok Udo-Obong, Sunday Bada Nigeria NGR 1 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
98 3.01.07   Tim Benjamin, Sean Baldock, Malachi Davis 45.14, Matthew Elias 45.21 Great Britain GBR 5 Final Athens 28 August 2004
99 3.01.08   Remigijus Valiulis LTU, Mikhail Linge RUS, Nikolay Chernyetskiy RUS, Viktor Markin RUS Soviet Union URS 1 Final Moscow 1 August 1980
100 3.01.12   Stig Lönnqvist, Ari Salin, Ossi Karttunen, Markku Kukkoaho Finland FIN 6 Final Munich 10 September 1972
101 3.01.13   Jens Carlowitz GER, Mathias Schersing GER, Frank Möller GER, Thomas Schönlebe GER East Germany GDR 4 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
102 3.01.13   Sunday Uti, Moses Ugbisie, Henry Amike, Innocent Egbunike Nigeria NGR 4 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
103 3.01.20   Nduka Awazie, Clement Chukwu, Fidelix Gadzama, Enefiok Udo-Obong Nigeria NGR 1 Heat 5 Sydney 29 September 2000
104 3.01.20   Mark Richardson, Kriss Akabusi, Roger Black, Du'aine Thorne-Ladejo Great Britain GBR 2 Heat 1 Barcelona 7 August 1992
105 3.01.21   Martin Winbolt-Lewis 46.2, Colin Campbell 44.9, David Hemery 44.6, John Sherwood 45.5 Great Britain GBR 5 Final Mexico 20 October 1968
106 3.01.22   Jared Deacon, Daniel Caines 44.65, Daniel Caines, Iwan Thomas 45.26, Iwan Thomas, Jamie Baulch 45.68, Jamie Baulch Great Britain GBR 5 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
107 3.01.25   Alwyn Myburgh RSA, Hezekiél Sepeng RSA, Llewellyn Herbert RSA, Arnaud Malherbe RSA South Africa RSA 5 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
108 3.01.26   Martin Reynolds, Alan Pascoe, David Hemery, David Jenkins Great Britain GBR 1 Heat 1 Munich 9 September 1972
109 3.01.26   Klaus Thiele GER, Andreas Knebel GER, Frank Schaffer GER, Volker Beck GER East Germany GDR 2 Final Moscow 1 August 1980
110 3.01.26   Pieter Smith, Ofentse Mogawane, Alwyn Myburgh, LJ van Zyl South Africa RSA 6 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
111 3.01.27   Charles Asati, Hezekiah Nyamau, Robert Ouko, Julius Sang Kenya KEN 2 Heat 1 Munich 9 September 1972
112 3.01.30   Filip Walotka, Piotr Długosielski, Jacek Bocian, Robert Maćkowiak Poland POL 2 Heat 5 Sydney 29 September 2000
113 3.01.35   Jared Deacon, Daniel Caines, Iwan Thomas, Jamie Baulch Great Britain GBR 2 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
114 3.01.35   Masayoshi Kan, Susumu Takano, Yoshihiko Saito, Takahiro Watanabe Japan JPN 3 Heat 1 Barcelona 7 August 1992
115 3.01.36   Iwan Thomas, Jamie Baulch, Du'aine Thorne-Ladejo, Mark Richardson Great Britain GBR 1 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
116 3.01.38   Eronilde de Araújo, Ediélson Tenório, Sérgio de Menêzes, Sidnei de Souza Brazil BRA 1 Heat 3 Barcelona 7 August 1992
117 3.01.43   Ryszard Podlas, Jan Werner, Zbigniew Jaremski, Jerzy Pietrzyk Poland POL 2 Final Montreal 31 July 1976
118 3.01.44   Willie Smith NAM, Ray Armstead, Alonzo Babers, Walter McCoy United States USA 1 Heat 4 Los Angeles 10 August 1984
119 3.01.44   Roberto Tozzi, Ernesto Nocco, Roberto Ribaud, Pietro Mennea Italy ITA 5 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
120 3.01.45   Michael Blackwood 45.60, Ricardo Chambers 44.47, Sanjay Ayre 44.86, Lansford Spence 46.52 Jamaica JAM 8 Final Beijing 23 August 2008
121 3.01.50   Timothy Munnings, Troy McIntosh, Carl Oliver, Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 3 Heat 5 Sydney 29 September 2000
122 3.01.59   Branislav Karaulic, Slobodan Popovic SRB, Slobodan Brankovic SRB, Ismail Macev MKD Yugoslavia YUG 5 Semifinal 2 Seoul 30 September 1988
123 3.01.6   Tim Graham 45.9, Adrian Metcalfe 45.5, John Cooper 45.4, Robbie Brightwell 44.8 Great Britain GBR 2 Final Tokyo 21 October 1964
124 3.01.60   Godday James, Musa Audu, Saul Welgopwa, Enefiok Udo-Obong Nigeria NGR 2 Heat 2 Athens 27 August 2004
125 3.01.60   Richard Louis, David Peltier, Clyde Edwards, Elvis Forde Barbados BAR 6 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
126 3.01.61   Robson Caetano da Silva, Ediélson Tenório, Sérgio de Menêzes, Sidnei de Souza Brazil BRA 4 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
127 3.01.7   Edwin Skinner 46.0, Kent Bernard 45.3, Edwin Roberts 45.4, Wendell Mottley 45.0 Trinidad and Tobago TTO 3 Final Tokyo 21 October 1964
128 3.01.70   Nils Duerinck, Jonathan Borlée, Antoine Gillet, Kevin Borlée Belgium BEL 4 Heat 1 London 9 August 2012
129 3.01.71   Udeme Ekpeyong, Emmanuel Okoli CAN, Hassan Bosso, Sunday Bada Nigeria NGR 5 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
130 3.01.72   Moustapha Diarra, Aboubakry Dia, Hachim Ndiaye, Ibou Faye Senegal SEN 2 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
131 3.01.73   Samson Kitur, Samson Yego, Simon Kemboi, Julius Chepkwony Kenya KEN 3 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
132 3.01.74   Andrae Williams, Dennis Darling, Nathaniel McKinney, Chris Brown Bahamas BAH 3 Heat 2 Athens 27 August 2004
133 3.01.76   Yon Soriano, Luguelín Santos, Luis Charles, Gustavo Cuesta   DOM 5 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
134 3.01.79   Du'aine Thorne-Ladejo, Jamie Baulch, Mark Hylton, Mark Richardson Great Britain GBR 1 Heat 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
135 3.01.8   Nikolay Chernyetskiy RUS, Mikhail Linge RUS, Remigijus Valiulis LTU, Viktor Burakov UKR Soviet Union URS 1 Heat 1 Moscow 31 July 1980
136 3.01.83   Kevin Borlée, Antoine Gillet, Jonathan Borlée, Michaël Bultheel Belgium BEL 6 Final London 10 August 2012
137 3.01.84   Anthony Zambrano, Diego Armando Palomeque, Carlos Andrés Lemos, Jhon Perlaza   COL 6 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
138 3.01.88   Nathaniel McKinney, Aaron Cleare, Andrae Williams 45.81, Chris Brown 44.66 Bahamas BAH 6 Final Athens 28 August 2004
139 3.01.91   Casey Vincent, Blair Young, Pat Dwyer, Michael Hazel Australia AUS 3 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
140 3.01.92   Piotr Rysiukiewicz, Paweł Januszewski, Robert Maćkowiak, Piotr Haczek Poland POL 2 Heat 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
141 3.01.92   Shunji Karube, Jun Osakada, Shigekazu Omori, Koji Ito Japan JPN 3 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
142 3.01.98   Franz-Peter Hofmeister GER, Lothar Krieg GER, Harald Schmid GER, Bernd Herrmann GER West Germany FRG 3 Final Montreal 31 July 1976
143 3.02.00   Brian Whittle, Kriss Akabusi, Todd Bennett, Phil Brown Great Britain GBR 5 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
144 3.02.01   Maksim Dyldin, Denis Alekseyev, Vladimir Krasnov, Pavel Trenikhin Russia RUS 3 Heat 2 London 9 August 2012
145 3.02.09   Alessandro Aimar, Marco Vaccari, Fabio Grossi, Andrea Nuti Italy ITA 2 Heat 3 Barcelona 7 August 1992
146 3.02.09   John Goville, Moses Kyeswa, Peter Rwamuhanda, Mike Okot Uganda UGA 7 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
147 3.02.16   Andrew Valmon, Kevin Robinzine, Antonio McKay, Steve Lewis United States USA 1 Heat 3 Seoul 30 September 1988
148 3.02.17   Troy McIntosh, Timothy Munnings, Theron Cooper, Dennis Darling Bahamas BAH 4 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
149 3.02.18   Alessandro Aimar, Marco Vaccari, Fabio Grossi, Andrea Nuti Italy ITA 6 Final Barcelona 8 August 1992
150 3.02.18   Arturo Ramírez, Alberto Aguilar, Albert Bravo, Omar Longart Venezuela VEN 7 Final London 10 August 2012
151 3.02.22   Sunday Uti, Moses Ugbisie, Rotimi Peters, Innocent Egbunike Nigeria NGR 1 Semifinal 2 Los Angeles 10 August 1984
152 3.02.22   Ingo Schultz, Kamghe Gaba, Ruwen Faller 45.83, Bastian Swillims 45.13 Germany GER 7 Final Athens 28 August 2004
153 3.02.24   Yunier Pérez, Yunior Díaz, William Collazo, Omar Cisneros Cuba CUB 7 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
154 3.02.28   Abdelali Kasbane, Abdelghani Guériguer, Bouchaïb Belkaïd, Benyounès Lahlou Morocco MAR 3 Heat 3 Barcelona 7 August 1992
155 3.02.28   Andrey Semyonov, Dmitriy Bogdanov, Ruslan Mashchenko, Dmitriy Golovastov Russia RUS 4 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
156 3.02.29   Piotr Rysiukiewicz, Tomasz Jedrusik, Robert Maćkowiak, Piotr Haczek Poland POL 4 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
157 3.02.3   Lawrence Kahn 46.1, Malcolm Spence 45.4, Melville Spence 45.2, George Kerr 45.6 Jamaica JAM 4 Final Tokyo 21 October 1964
158 3.02.37   Jack Yerman 46.29, Earl Young 45.52, Glenn Davis 45.31, Otis Davis45.25 United States USA 1 Final Rome 8 September 1960
159 3.02.40   Tim Benjamin, Sean Baldock, Malachi Davis, Matthew Elias Great Britain GBR 1 Heat 1 Athens 27 August 2004
160 3.02.49   Robert Ballard, Mark Garner, Miles Murphy, Darren Clark Australia AUS 6 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
161 3.02.49   Johnson Kubisa, California Molefe, Gaolisela Salang 46.37, Kagiso Kilego 44.93 Botswana BOT 8 Final Athens 28 August 2004
162 3.02.50   Sunday Uti, Moses Ugbisie, Henry Amike, Innocent Egbunike Nigeria NGR 7 Final Seoul 2 October 1988
163 3.02.51   Everson Teixeira, Valdinei da Silva, Osmar dos Santos, Sanderlei Claro Parrela Brazil BRA 3 Heat 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
164 3.02.52   Jan Werner, Jan Balachowski, Zbigniew Jaremski, Andrzej Badenski Poland POL 1 Heat 3 Munich 9 September 1972
165 3.02.52   Samson Yego, Simon Kemboi, Kennedy Ochieng, Julius Chepkwony Kenya KEN 1 Heat 3 Atlanta 2 August 1996
166 3.02.56   Fabrizio Mori, Alessandro Aimar, Andrea Nuti, Ashraf Saber Italy ITA 5 Semifinal 2 Atlanta 2 August 1996
167 3.02.57   Erik Carlgren, Anders Faager, Kenth Öhman, Ulf Rönner Sweden SWE 7 Final Munich 10 September 1972
168 3.02.61   Moustapha Diarra, Aboubakry Dia, Hachim Ndiaye, Ibou Faye Senegal SEN 2 Heat 3 Atlanta 2 August 1996
169 3.02.62   Arturo Ramírez, Alberto Aguilar, Albert Bravo, José Meléndez Venezuela VEN 4 Heat 2 London 9 August 2012
170 3.02.64   Ian Seale, Dan Domansky, Leighton Hope, Brian Saunders Canada CAN 4 Final Montreal 31 July 1976
171 3.02.67   Oumar Loum, Ousmane Niang, Youssoupha Sarr, Ibou Faye Senegal SEN 4 Heat 5 Sydney 29 September 2000
172 3.02.68   Oleksandr Kaydash, Roman Voronko, Yevheniy Zyukov, Hennadiy Horbenko Ukraine UKR 5 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
173 3.02.69   Arturo Ramírez, Omar Longart, Albert Bravo, Freddy Mezones   VEN 6 Heat 2 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
174 3.02.71   Yuki Yamaguchi, Jun Osakada, Tomohiro Ito, Mitsuhiro Sato Japan JPN 2 Heat 1 Athens 27 August 2004
175 3.02.71   Carl Oliver, Troy McIntosh, Dennis Darling, Timothy Munnings Bahamas BAH 7 Final Atlanta 3 August 1996
176 3.02.73   Udeme Ekpeyong, Clement Chukwu, Ayuba Machem, Sunday Bada Nigeria NGR 3 Heat 3 Atlanta 2 August 1996
177 3.02.77   Ingo Schultz, Kamghe Gaba, Ruwen Faller, Bastian Swillims Germany GER 3 Heat 1 Athens 27 August 2004
178 3.02.81   Greg Haughton, Dennis Blake, Roxbert Martin, Garth Robinson Jamaica JAM 1 Heat 4 Atlanta 2 August 1996
179 3.02.82   Shunji Karube, Jun Osakada, Shigekazu Omori, Kenji Tabata Japan JPN 1 Heat 5 Atlanta 2 August 1996
180 3.02.82   Mike Sokolowski, Doug Hinds, Brian Saunders, Tim Bethune Canada CAN 8 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
181 3.02.84   Hans-Jochen Reske 47.11, Manfred Kinder 45.04, Johannes Kaiser 45.83, Carl Kaufmann 44.86 Germany GER 2 Final Rome 8 September 1960
182 3.02.84   Andrew Valmon, Kevin Robinzine, Antonio McKay, Steve Lewis United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Seoul 30 September 1988
183 3.02.84   Leighton Priestley, Don Quarrie, Colin Bradford, Seymour Newman Jamaica JAM 5 Final Montreal 31 July 1976
184 3.02.86   Piotr Wiaderek, Marcin Marciniszyn, Michał Pietrzak, Kacper Kozłowski Poland POL 5 Heat 1 London 9 August 2012
185 3.02.89   Rohan Pradeep Kumara, Vellasamy Ratnakumara, Ranga Wiwalawansa, R.A. Sugath Thilakaratne Sri Lanka SRI 6 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
186 3.02.94   Oumar Loum, Ousmane Niang, Youssoupha Sarr, Ibou Faye Senegal SEN 7 Semifinal 2 Sydney 29 September 2000
187 3.02.95   Julian Jrummi Walsh, Tomoya Tamura, Takamasa Kitagawa, Nobuya Kato   JPN 7 Heat 1 Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
188 3.02.96   Alfred Visagie, Arnaud Malherbe, Hendrick Mokganyetsi, Bobang Phiri South Africa RSA 5 Semifinal 1 Atlanta 2 August 1996
189 3.02.97   Stig Lönnqvist, Ari Salin, Ossi Karttunen, Markku Kukkoaho Finland FIN 2 Heat 3 Munich 9 September 1972
190 3.02.98   Kriss Akabusi, Garry Cook, Todd Bennett, Phil Brown Great Britain GBR 2 Semifinal 1 Los Angeles 10 August 1984
191 3.03.02     Poland POL 1 Round One Heat Two Mexico 19 October 1968
192 3.03.03   Ryszard Podlas, Jan Werner, Zbigniew Jaremski, Jerzy Pietrzyk Poland POL 1 Heat 2 Montreal 30 July 1976
193 3.03.05   Erik Carlgren, Kenth Öhman, Ulf Rönner, Anders Faager Sweden SWE 3 Heat 1 Munich 9 September 1972
194 3.03.05   Laurent Clerc, Kevin Widmer, Alain Rohr, Matthias Rusterholz Switzerland SUI 4 Heat 3 Atlanta 2 August 1996
195 3.03.06   John Steffensen, Clinton Hill, Pat Dwyer, Mark Ormrod Australia AUS 4 Heat 1 Athens 27 August 2004
196 3.03.13   Gilles Bertould, Roger Velasquez, Francis Kerbiriou, Jacques Carette France FRA 3 Heat 3 Munich 9 September 1972
197 3.03.17   Steven Solomon, Ben Offereins, Brendan Cole, John Steffensen Australia AUS 5 Heat 2 London 9 August 2012
198 3.03.19   Teddy Venel, Idrissa M'Barke, Brice Panel, Richard Maunier France FRA 8 Heat 1 Beijing 22 August 2008
199 3.03.22   Piotr Rysiukiewicz, Robert Maćkowiak 46.3, Robert Maćkowiak, Piotr Długosielski 46.2, Piotr Długosielski, Piotr Haczek 45.4, Piotr Haczek Poland POL 6 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
200 3.03.24   Franz-Peter Hofmeister GER, Lothar Krieg GER, Harald Schmid GER, Bernd Herrmann GER West Germany FRG 2 Heat 1 Montreal 30 July 1976
201 3.03.24   Tito Sawe, Lucas Sang, Paul Ereng, Simon Kipkemboi Kenya KEN 2 Semifinal 1 Seoul 30 September 1988
 
   
  Pefomances annulled cause of doping
  2.56.35   Alvin Harrison DOM, Antonio Pettigrew 44.17, Antonio Pettigrew, Calvin Harrison 43.53, Calvin Harrison, Michael Johnson 44.29, Michael Johnson United States USA 1 Final Sydney 30 September 2000
  2.58.78   Jerome Young USA, Angelo Taylor USA, Calvin Harrison USA, Alvin Harrison DOM United States USA 1 Semifinal 1 Sydney 29 September 2000
  3.03.52   Jerome Young USA, Angelo Taylor USA, Calvin Harrison USA, Alvin Harrison DOM United States USA 1 Heat 3 Sydney 29 September 2000

 

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