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3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events

Olympic Events in Athletics - 50 kilometres Walk (Men's)

50 kilometres Walk (Men's)

 
First Gold Meda  list
 TommyGreen
GBR Tommy Green
 

Games: 19 games in 15 countries
First Held: 1932 Summer Games
Last Held: 2016 Summer Games

Participants: 506 from 63 countries
Top Athlete Medalist(s): 3 athletes with 3 medals
Top Country Medalist(s): ITA Italy (6 medals)

Race walking events at the Summer Olympics have been contested over a variety of distances at the multi-sport event. There are three race walking events in the current Olympic athletics programme: a men's and a women's 20 kilometres walk, and a men's 50 kilometres walk. The races are held in a final-only format.

The first men's events came at the 1908 London Olympics, which featured 3500 m and 10-mile distances. A 10-kilometre version was introduced at the 1912 Summer Olympics and it continued until 1952 (skipping three editions from 1928–1936). There was also a one-off 3000 m walk at the 1920 Antwerp Olympics. The men's 20 km walk became the standard short distance for men in 1956 and has continued since then. The longer men's event over 50 km was first held at the 1932 Summer Olympics and has been held continuously until the present day, except for a brief drop from the programme in 1976 – the IAAF held a World Championship for the event in protest and it was restored.


Overview
Sport Athletics
Gender Men
Years held Men 50 km: 1932 – 2016
Olympic record
Men 50 km 3:36:53 Jared Tallent (2012)

The first women's event was introduced at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, 84 years after the first men's race. Held over 10 km for the first two editions, the women's event was extended to match the men's 20 km distance from the 2000 Sydney Olympics onwards. Women has never commonly competed internationally over 50 km, thus it has never been proposed as an Olympic event – as of 2012 it remains the only event on the Olympic athletics programme in which men compete, but women do not have an equivalent. The 50 km is also the longest distance race for an Olympic athletics event.

The Olympic records in racewalking were all broken at the 2012 London Olympics. In the 20 km walk Chen Ding holds the men's record of 1:18:46 hours, while Elena Lashmanova holds the women's mark of 1:25:02 hours. The men's 50 km record is 3:35:59 hours, set by Sergey Kirdyapkin. Lashmanova's time was a world record – the first and so far only time a world record in racewalking has been set at an Olympic Games. Robert Korzeniowski is the most successful Olympic racewalker, having won the 50 km three times as well as the 20 km walk. Two other athletes have won four Olympic walk medals: Ugo Frigerio won three gold medals and a bronze in early competitions, while Volodymyr Holubnychy won two 20 km walk titles as well as a silver and bronze.

The 1906 Intercalated Games, now not considered an official Olympic event, was the first venue for racewalking under the Olympic banner. Poor technique and judging significantly affected the 1500 m walk event, to the point where a rematch over 3000 m was added at short notice and judged by Constantine I of Greece.

50 kilometer Walk for men at Olympics

50 kilometer Walk for Men at Olympics: The race walking event is also known as the "speed walking". It is different from the running event in many aspects. The athletes gain great speed by using their hip and hand muscles during the event. The walkers remain much closer to the ground than the running event. The muscle and body movement during the race walks vary from the running events. Race walking needs extreme endurance power on the part of the athletes. During the race, judges are appointed for monitoring the movements of the athletes. The 50 kilometer walk for men is a sport event included in the Olympics schedule.

50 kilometer Walk for Men in Summer Olympics: The 50 kilometer walk for men was introduced to the Olympics at the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Games. After the 1932 Olympics, men's 50 kilometer walk event has been held in every Summer Games.

Rules for 50 kilometer Walk for Men at Olympics: The International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF has set many rules for the track and field events. The rules set for the 50 kilometer walk for men are -

 

 

  • During the race walk, the athletes have to remain in contact with the ground. The forward leg has to be straight. If the knee of the forward leg is bent, the athlete is given a warning.
  • The number of judges appointed during a race walk is minimum six.
  • An athlete is warned for commencing any offence. However, the same judge cannot warn an athlete twice. The method of warning an athlete is showing a yellow paddle to him.
  • If an athlete losses contact with the ground or bends his knees, he is shown a red paddle by the judge. The red paddle is usually sent to the chief judge.
  • Any athlete receiving three red cards from three different judges is liable to disqualification from the competition.
  • An athlete competing in the 50 kilometer walk event is obliged to leave the course if asked to do so by an official medical staff.
  • An athlete found taking refreshment at places other than the specified refreshment station is liable for disqualification from the competition.
  • During the 50 kilometer walk event, an athlete can leave the course only if he is permitted to do so. The athlete has to be under strict supervision of the judge during his stay outside the course. .

Medal Winners in the 50 kilometer Walk for Men at Olympics: Some of the athletes who won medals in the 50 kilometer walk event are Shucai Xing, Andreas Erm, Andrey Perlov, Valeriy Spitsyn, German Skurygin, Yucheng Han, Chengliang Zhao, Yu Caohong, Robert Korzeniowski, Denis Nizhegorodov, Vyacheslav Ivanenko, Raul Gonzalez, Hartwig Gauder, Bernd Kannenberg, Christoph Hohne, Abdon Pamich, Don Thompson, Norman Read, Giuseppe Dordoni, John Ljunggren, Harold Whitlock and Thomas Green.

50000 KM

Olympic history: Men’s race walks

We take a look at the history of the men’s race walk events at the Olympic Games

The walks will be difficult to predict in Rio. Russians have won gold in each of the three walk events in 2008 and 2012 but will not be in Brazil after their drugs suspension.

In the 2015 World Championships, in the 20km, Spain’s Miguel Lopez won from Zhen Wang and these two along with world record-holder Yusuke Suzuki, who dropped out of Beijing, will be the likely favourites. In the 50km, world champion Matej Toth should start as favourite, while perennial runner-up Jared Tallent and former world champion Robert Heffernan of Ireland could be up there.

In Russia’s absence, the gold would look to be in Chinese hands and the big favourite could be world record-holder and world champion Hong Liu. France’s Yohan Diniz could also be a factor in either event.

1906-2012

The first Olympic walk was a 1500m track event in the 1906 Olympics. Britain’s Richard Wilkinson was first to finish but, along with the second-placed athlete Eugen Spiegler, was disqualified. In his first walks race, American George Bonhag was next across the line and, although disqualified by two of the four judges, was adjudged the winner. He had been fourth and sixth in the 5 miles and 1500m respectively and was quickly shown the technique by the man who he pushed into silver, Donald Linden of Canada.

A few days later in a 3000m walk, Wilkinson and Spiegler were again disqualified, this time in a sprint finish, and gold went to Hungary’s Gyorgy Sztantics.

After a 3500m walk in London in 1908, the event was standardised at 10km in Stockholm in 1912. British-born Canadian George Goulding won in a quick 46:28.4. Italian Ugo Frigerio won the titles easily in 1920 and 1924 and also won the final 3000m in 1920.

The 10km wasn’t held between 1928 and 1936 and thus Goulding’s Olympic record survived until 1948 when John Mikaelsson walked 45:03.0 in qualification and then 45:13.2 in the final. Favourite Verner Hardno, who set 29 world records between 1943 and 1945, was disqualified.

Mikaelsson defended his title successfully in 1952 with a barely faster 45:02.8. Fritz Schwab and Bruno Junk had a sprint finish for second and were clearly running through the line with just two hundredths of a second between them but weren’t disqualified.

Seven were eliminated in the heats and final and the controversy led to the event being switched to a 20km road event in Melbourne in 1956, where Soviet Leonid Spirin won after only being tenth at halfway.

Meanwhile, a 50km event was introduced in 1932 in Los Angeles. Britons won there and in Berlin in 1936 – see “British successes” below.

The first non-British 50km winner was Sweden’s John Ljunggren, who won easily in London in 1948, while in Helsinki in 1952 Giuseppe Dordoni won in an Olympic record 4:28:07.8.

Norman Read, who had moved from England to New Zealand in 1954, wanted to represent Britain but his plea was rejected by the selectors. Instead he competed for the Kiwis in Melbourne in 1956 and, two minutes down after 30km, moved through for a clear win in the last 10km.

Britain enjoyed more success in 1960 in the longer walk while, in the 20km, Ukrainian Vladimir Golubnichiy, representing the Soviet Union, gained a narrow win over Australian Noel Freeman.

In Tokyo in 1964, Britain’s success came in the 20km as Italian Abdon Pamich narrowly won the longer event in an Olympic record 4:11.12.4.

At the altitude of Mexico, Golubnichiy regained his 20km title (see “memorable races” below) while at 50km, East Germany’s Christophe Hohne moved up from fourth in 1964 to first as many athletes struggled in the altitude and he won by over ten minutes.

There was a home victory at 50km in Munich in 1972 as world record-holder Bernd Kannenberg, ensured the Olympic record finally went inside four hours.

In the 20km, it was an East German victory as Peter Frenkel smashed the Olympic record with 1:26:42.4, narrowly ahead of the great Golubnichiy.

Golubnichiy was only seventh in Montreal in 1976 where Mexican Daniel Bautista won in the fastest ever time of 1:24:40.6. Controversially there was no 50km walk in Canada, but it returned in Moscow in 1980 where Hartwig Gauder reduced the Olympic record to 3:49:24.

In the 20km, Bautista was leading at 17km and seemingly on his way to retaining his title when he was disqualified. Some felt a well publicised picture of Bautista with both feet off the ground when winning in Montreal was a factor in his disqualification four years later.

Three of the first six at 15km were disqualified and Italian Maurizio Damilano came through for a surprise victory.

Damilano finished a close third in Los Angeles in 1984 where Mexico’s world record-holder Ernesto Canto reduced the Olympic mark to 1:23:13. The runner-up, his team-mate Raul Gonzalez, fared better in the 50km walk, where he won by almost six minutes in an Olympic record 3:47:26.

That record fell a further nine minutes in Seoul as Vyacheslav Ivanenko won in 3:38:29 with Ronald Weigel of East Germany pushing him close.

Weigel had gone even closer in the 20km walk where the Czech Jozef Pribilinec edged him by three seconds with the first Olympic sub-80.

Damilano picked up another medal in third and was fourth in Barcelona in 1992, as Spain’s Daniel Plaza won easily. Siberian Andrey Perlov won the 50km in Spain. Robert Korzeniowski, who was second leading up to the entrance of the stadium, was disqualified. However, Poland’s Korzeniowski proved his brilliance by winning the event in Atlanta in 1996, Sydney in 2000 and Athens in 2004. In Greece, he won by more than four minutes and came close to the world best with a 3:38:46 winning time.

He finished only eighth in the 20km walk in Atlanta where Jefferson Perez won but he won gold in the 20km at Sydney in a fast 1:18:59. However, this was only after Bernardo Segura, who had been two seconds ahead, was disqualified. The chief judge told Segura immediately after he had been congratulated on the phone by the Mexican president!

The 1999 world champion, Ivano Brugnetti of Italy, won the 20km in Athens in 2004.

Russia won in 2008 and China in 2012, with Chen Ding winning the latter in an Olympic record 1:18:46.

Italy’s Alex Schwazer won the 2008 50km title ahead of Australia’s Jared Tallent, while Tallent has since received London 2012 gold after

Men's 50 km walk

GamesGoldSilverBronze
1932 Los Angeles Tommy Green
 Great Britain
Jānis Daliņš
 Latvia
Ugo Frigerio
 Italy
1936 Berlin Harold Whitlock
 Great Britain
Arthur Tell Schwab
 Switzerland
Adalberts Bubenko
 Latvia
1948 London John Ljunggren
 Sweden
Gaston Godel
 Switzerland
Tebbs Lloyd Johnson
 Great Britain
1952 Helsinki Pino Dordoni
 Italy
Josef Doležal
 Czechoslovakia
Antal Róka
 Hungary
1956 Melbourne Norman Read
 New Zealand
Yevgeniy Maskinskov
 Soviet Union
John Ljunggren
 Sweden
1960 Rome Don Thompson
 Great Britain
John Ljunggren
 Sweden
Abdon Pamich
 Italy
1964 Tokyo Abdon Pamich
 Italy
Paul Nihill
 Great Britain
Ingvar Pettersson
 Sweden
1968 Mexico City Christoph Höhne
 East Germany
Antal Kiss
 Hungary
Larry Young
 United States
1972 Munich Bernd Kannenberg
 West Germany
Veniamin Soldatenko
 Soviet Union
Larry Young
 United States
1976 Montreal not included in the Olympic program
1980 Moscow Hartwig Gauder
 East Germany
Jordi Llopart
 Spain
Yevgeniy Ivchenko
 Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles Raúl González
 Mexico
Bo Gustafsson
 Sweden
Sandro Bellucci
 Italy
1988 Seoul Vyacheslav Ivanenko
 Soviet Union
Ronald Weigel
 East Germany
Hartwig Gauder
 East Germany
1992 Barcelona Andrey Perlov
 Unified Team
Carlos Mercenario
 Mexico
Ronald Weigel
 Germany
1996 Atlanta Robert Korzeniowski
 Poland
Mikhail Shchennikov
 Russia
Valentí Massana
 Spain
2000 Sydney Robert Korzeniowski
 Poland
Aigars Fadejevs
 Latvia
Joel Sánchez
 Mexico
2004 Athens Robert Korzeniowski
 Poland
Denis Nizhegorodov
 Russia
Aleksey Voyevodin
 Russia
2008 Beijing Alex Schwazer
 Italy
Jared Tallent
 Australia
Denis Nizhegorodov
 Russia
2012 London Jared Tallent
 Australia
Si Tianfeng
 China
Robert Heffernan
 Ireland
2016 Rio de Janeiro Matej Tóth
 Slovakia
Jared Tallent
 Australia
Hirooki Arai
 Japan

Multiple medalists

RankAthleteNationOlympicsGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Robert Korzeniowski  Poland (POL) 1996–2004 3 0 0 3
2 Jared Tallent  Australia (AUS) 2008–2016 1 2 0 3
3 John Ljunggren  Sweden (SWE) 1948–1960 1 1 1 3
4 Abdon Pamich  Italy (ITA) 1960–1964 1 0 1 2
Hartwig Gauder  East Germany (GDR) 1980–1988 1 0 1 2
6 Ronald Weigel  East Germany (GDR)
 Germany (GER)
1988–1992 0 1 1 2
Denis Nizhegorodov  Russia (RUS) 2004–2008 0 1 1 2
8 Larry Young  United States (USA) 1968–1972 0 0 2 2

Medals by country

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Great Britain (GBR) 3 1 1 5
2  Italy (ITA) 3 0 3 6
3  Poland (POL) 3 0 0 3
4  East Germany (GDR) 2 1 1 4
5  Sweden (SWE) 1 2 2 5
6  Soviet Union (URS) 1 2 1 4
7  Australia (AUS) 1 2 0 3
8  Mexico (MEX) 1 1 1 3
9  New Zealand (NZL) 1 0 0 1
 Slovakia (SVK) 1 0 0 1
 Unified Team (EUN) 1 0 0 1
 West Germany (FRG) 1 0 0 1
13  Russia (RUS) 0 2 2 4
14  Latvia (LAT) 0 2 1 3
15  Switzerland (SUI) 0 2 0 2
16  Hungary (HUN) 0 1 1 2
 Spain (ESP) 0 1 1 2
18  China (CHN) 0 1 0 1
 Czechoslovakia (TCH) 0 1 0 1
20  United States (USA) 0 0 2 2
21  Germany (GER) 0 0 1 1
 Ireland (IRL) 0 0 1 1
 Japan (JPN) 0 0 1 1

50 kilometres Walk (Men's) History Year by Year (by IAAF) 1896-2012

 50000-1.JPG  50000-2.JPG
  
Los Angeles, 3 Aug 1932
(Competitors: 15; Countries: 10)

Results

RankNameNationalityTime (hand)Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Tommy Green Great Britain 4:50:10 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Jānis Daliņš Latvia 4:57:20  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ugo Frigerio Italy 4:59:06  
4 Karl Hähnel Germany 5:06:06  
5 Ettore Rivolta Italy 5:07:39  
6 Paul Sievert Germany 5:16:41  
7 Henri Quintric France 5:27:25  
8 Ernie Crosbie United States 5:28:02  
9 Bill Chisholm United States 5:51:00  
10 Alfred Maasik Estonia 6:19:00  
  Henry Cieman Canada   DNF
  John Moralis Greece   DNF
Green, Daliņš and the veteran Frigerio were together at the three-quarter mark, and then the Briton slipped back before being revived when some cold water was thrown over him. Green and Daliņš built up a 300m lead over the great Italian walker, competing in his fourth Games. Green then got away from Daliņš, as the latter began to suffer from cramp, and the Englishman eventually won by more than seven minutes, the second greatest margin of victory in the history of the event.
Berlin, 5 Aug 1936
(Competitors: 33; Countries: 16)

Results

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Harold Whitlock Great Britain 4:30:41.4 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Arthur Tell Schwab Switzerland 4:32:09.2  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Adalberts Bubenko Latvia 4:32:42.2  
4 Jaroslav Štork Czechoslovakia 4:34:00.2  
5 Edgar Bruun Norway 4:34:53.2  
6 Fritz Bleiweiß Germany 4:36:48.4  
7 Karl Reiniger Switzerland 4:40:45.0  
8 Étienne Laisné France 4:41:40.0  
9 Teodor Bieregowoj Poland 4:42:49.0  
10 Anton Toscani Netherlands 4:42:59.4  
11 Evald Segerström Sweden 4:43:30.4  
12 Ettore Rivolta Italy 4:48:47.0  
A large group were together at 10Km, reached in an official time of 46:40, though 50 minutes would be a more accurate appraisal. Štork and Janis Daliņš then broke away, with Štork just ahead of Daliņš at 20Km. By 30Km Daliņš (2:37:12) led by a minute from Whitlock, who closed in and caught the Latvian 2Km later. Daliņš soon fell back, and gave up shortly afterwards, while Štork recovered from fifth place to take second by 35Km. The effort was too much, and the Czech fell back, only just holding off Bruun for fourth, while Schwab and Bubenko battled for second place. Whitlock got home comfortably ahead of Schwab and Bubenko, though the Swiss did close to within 35 seconds just before 45Km.
London, 31 Jul 1948
(Competitors: 22; Countries: 10)

Results

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) John Ljunggren Sweden 4:41:52  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Gaston Godel Switzerland 4:48:17  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Tebbs Lloyd Johnson Great Britain 4:48:31  
4 Edgar Bruun Norway 4:53:18  
5 Bert Martineau Great Britain 4:53:58  
6 Rune Bjurström Sweden 4:56:43  
7 Pierre Mazille France 5:01:40  
8 Claude Hubert France 5:03:12  
9 Enrique Villaplana Spain 5:03:31  
10 Tage Jönsson Sweden 5:05:08  
11 Henri Caron France 5:08:15  
12 Ernie Crosbie United States 5:15:16  
Ljunggren dominated the event, leading from the start and building up a lead of 40 seconds at 5Km. By halfway the lead was five minutes, and he won untroubled, by 6:25, ahead of Godel who gained over a minute on third place in the last 10Km. Lloyd-Johnson had finished 17th in 1936 aged 36, and became the oldest ever medal winner (48 years 115 days) in the London Games. Harold Whitlock’s younger brother Rex was in second place at halfway, but had to retire at the 35Km mark, while Italy’s Valentino Bertolino, who later produced the year’s fastest time (4:25:37), also failed to finish.
Helsinki, 21 Jul 1952
(Competitors: 31; Countries: 16)

Results

RankAthleteNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Giuseppe Dordoni Italy 4:28:07.8 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Josef Doležal Czechoslovakia 4:30:17.8  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Antal Róka Hungary 4:31:27.2  
4 Rex Whitlock Great Britain 4:32:21.0  
5 Sergey Lobastov Soviet Union 4:32:34.2  
6 Vladimir Ukhov Soviet Union 4:32:51.6  
7 Dumitru Paraschivescu Romania 4:41:05.2  
8 Ion Baboe Romania 4:41:52.8  
9 John Ljunggren Sweden 4:43:45.2  
10 Giuseppe Kressevich Italy 4:44:30.2  
11 Harold Whitlock Great Britain 4:45:12.6  
12 Sándor László Hungary 4:45:55.8  
The reigning champion Ljunggren went to the front from the start, but faded badly, and eventually placed ninth. At halfway Dordoni, the European Champion, was more than three minutes ahead of his most dangerous rival, Doležal, who would win two medals in the 1954 European Championships. The Italian won comfortably in a new Olympic record, despite wet and windy conditions. Róka closed fastest of all gaining almost a minute on Dordoni and Doležal, passing Rex Whitlock for bronze.
Melbourne, 24 Nov 1956
(Competitors: 21; Countries: 10)

Final classification

RANKNAME ATHLETETIME
Med 1.png  Norman Read (NZL) 4:30:42.8
Med 2.png  Yevgeniy Maskinskov (URS) 4:32:57.0
Med 3.png  John Ljunggren (SWE) 4:35:02.0
4.  Abdon Pamich (ITA) 4:39:00.0
5.  Antal Róka (HUN) 4:50:09.0
6.  Raymond Smith (AUS) 4:56:08.0
7.  Adolf Weinacker (USA) 5:00:16.0
8.  Albert Johnson (GBR) 5:02:19.0
9.  Eric Hall (GBR) 5:03:59.0
10.  Ion Barbu (ROU) 5:08:33.6
11.  Elliott Denman (USA) 5:12:14.0
12.  Leo Sjögren (USA) 5:12:34.0
Read had emigrated to New Zealand in 1954, and wrote to the British AAA asking permission to represent Great Britain in the Olympics, which was refused. He then won the Australian trials as a guest and earned selection for New Zealand. The fastest man in the field was Georgiy Klimov (URS) with 4:05:12, but Klimov withdrew just after 40Km while in third place, having used too much energy gaining four places in the previous 20Km. His teammate Maskinskov led by 47 seconds at 40Km, after holding a lead of almost two and-a-half minutes at 30Km. Read was closing fast, and passed the Russian at 42Km, going on to win by more than two minutes, with veteran Ljunggren third, well clear of future star Pamich, and Helsinki medallist Róka.
Rome, 7 Sep 1960
(Competitors: 39; Countries: 20)

Results

Final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Don Thompson Great Britain 4:25:30.0 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) John Ljunggren Sweden 4:25:47.0  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Abdon Pamich Italy 4:27:55.4  
4 Aleksandr Shcherbina Soviet Union 4:31:44.0  
5 Thomas Misson Great Britain 4:33:03.0  
6 Alex Oakley Canada 4:33:08.6  
7 Pino Dordoni Italy 4:33:27.2  
8 Zora Singh India 4:37:44.6  
9 Anatoly Vedyakov Soviet Union 4:39:57.6  
10 Antonio De Gaetano Italy 4:41:01.6  
11 Ladislav Moc Czechoslovakia 4:42:33.6  
12 George Hazle South Africa 4:43:18.8  
Uniquely this race contained Olympic Champions from five consecutive Games, from 1948 to 1964. Don Thompson had collapsed in 1956 when in fifth place at the 45Km point. He trained for the 1960 Games by exercising in his bathroom with electric heaters on and a room temperature of 40°C to simulate conditions in Rome. Zora Singh, the two Australians Noel Freeman and Ron Crawford, and Georgiy Klimov (URS) were the leaders through 20Km, but Freeman and Klimov were disqualified, and Crawford and Singh wilted in the heat, with the result that Thompson was in the lead by halfway. Ljunggren was his nearest rival, and the Swede, two days short of his 41st birthday, closed up on Thompson, catching him at 35Km. Thompson managed to get away, and eventually won by just 17 seconds, with Pamich third.
Tokyo, 18 Oct 1964
(Competitors: 34; Countries: 19)

Results

12 walkers beat the old Olympic record.

PlaceAthleteNationTime
1 Abdon Pamich Italy 4:11:12.4 OR
2 Paul Nihill Great Britain 4:11:31.2
3 Ingvar Pettersson Sweden 4:14:17.4
4 Burkhard Leuschke Germany 4:15:26.8
5 Bob Gardiner Australia 4:17:06.8
6 Christoph Höhne Germany 4:17:41.6
7 Anatoly Vediakov Soviet Union 4:19:55.8
8 Kurt Sakowski Germany 4:20:31.0
9 Charles Sowa Luxembourg 4:20:37.2
10 Don Thompson Great Britain 4:22:39.4
11 Ronald Crawford Australia 4:24:19.6
12 Gennady Agapov Soviet Union 4:24:34.0
Hungarian-born Pamich, the European Champion, was expected to win, and went quickly to the front. Only Höhne and Nihill were able to stay close. The East German slipped back at halfway, and the Briton drew level with Pamich at 30Km. The Italian opened a gap of four seconds at 40Km, which was five seconds at 45Km and 19 seconds by the finish. Pettersson improved his best time by four minutes to finish in bronze medal position.
Mexico City, 17 Oct 1968
(Competitors: 36; Countries: 19)

Result

RankAthleteNationTime
1st, gold medalist(s) Christoph Höhne East Germany 4:20:13.6
2nd, silver medalist(s) Antal Kiss Hungary 4:30:17.0
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Larry Young United States 4:31:55.4
4 Peter Selzer East Germany 4:33:09.8
5 Stig Lindberg Sweden 4:34:05.0
6 Vittorio Visini Italy 4:36:33.2
7 Bryan Eley Great Britain 4:37:32.2
8 José Pedraza Mexico 4:37:51.4
9 Karl-Heinz Merschenz Canada 4:37:57.4
10 Goetz Klopfer United States 4:39:13.8
11 Horst-Rüdiger Magnor West Germany 4:39:43.2
12 Frank Clark Australia 4:40:13.8
Having “blown up” in 1964, the 1967 World Cup winner Höhne was determined to rectify his Tokyo mistake. He, Paul Nihill and Gennadiy Agapov were the leaders, with Nihill holding a two second advantage at 20Km. Agapov had begun to fall back by 25Km and Nihill went in the next 5Km, both men eventually overcome by the heat and altitude. Höhne’s margin at 30Km was 1:53, by 40Km it was 4:58 and a whopping 10:03.4 by the finish, the largest margin in Olympic history. Kiss paced himself sensibly, and was able to hold off the unheralded Young, who scythed through the field in the last 20Km.
Munich, 3 Sep 1972
(Competitors: 36; Countries: 18)

Final

RankNameNationalityTime
1st, gold medalist(s) Bernd Kannenberg West Germany 3:56:11.6
2nd, silver medalist(s) Veniamin Soldatenko Soviet Union 3:58:24.0
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Larry Young United States 4:00:46.0
4 Otto Barch Soviet Union 4:01:35.4
5 Peter Selzer East Germany 4:04:05.4
6 Gerhard Weidner West Germany 4:06:26.0
7 Vittorio Visini Italy 4:08:31.4
8 Gabriel Hernández Mexico 4:12:09.0
9 Paul Nihill Great Britain 4:14:09.4
10 Charles Sowa Luxembourg 4:14:21.2
11 Karl-Heinz Stadtmüller East Germany 4:14:28.8
12 Hans Tenggren Sweden 4:16:37.6
Soldatenko, the European Champion, and Kannenberg, who had produced the fastest ever time of 3:52:45 earlier in the year, were expected to battle for the gold. Kannenberg went to the front from the start, and Soldatenko stayed with him for 35Km before dropping back. In third at 20Km was Sergey Grigoryev (URS) who was 1:26 behind the leaders, but he was disqualified shortly after the 25Km mark. Larry Young started conservatively, as he had done in 1968, but had moved up from 11th at 10Km to third at 30Km. He repeated his bronze medal of Mexico City with the best time ever by an American. Kannenberg’s winning time was the third-best ever, and Soldatenko’s was the number five mark of all-time. The one major disappointment was Christoph Höhne. The defending champion had a rare off-day, finishing 14th in 0.181064814814815
Moscow, 30 Jul 1980
(Competitors: 27; Countries: 14)

Final ranking

RankAthleteTimeNote
1st, gold medalist(s)  Hartwig Gauder (GDR) 3:49:24  
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Jordi Llopart (ESP) 3:51:25  
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Yevgeniy Ivchenko (URS) 3:56:32  
4  Bengt Simonsen (SWE) 3:57:08  
5  Vyacheslav Fursov (URS) 3:58:32  
6  Josep Marín (ESP) 4:03:08  
7  Stanisław Rola (POL) 4:07:07  
8  Willi Sawall (AUS) 4:08:25  
9  László Sátor (HUN) 4:10:53  
10  Pavol Blažek (TCH) 4:16:26  
11  Ian Richards (GBR) 4:22:57  
12  Aristidis Karageorgos (GRE) 4:24:36  
The attrition rate was high – with 12 of the 27 starters either failing to finish or disqualified. Hartwig Gauder and Yevgeniy Ivchenko set a fierce pace, passing 5Km in 22:45 with a group of eight walkers on their heels, but by 10Km the two leaders were 30 seconds up. European Champion Llopart, Mexicans Daniel Bautista and Raúl González, Boris Yakovlev (URS) and Dietmar Meisch (GDR) closed in at 20Km. González then shared the lead with Gauder, and by 30Km the two were leading from Yakovlev, with a gap of 1:26 to Llopart and Meisch. Bautista had already retired, and Yakovlev suffered the same fate soon after. González broke shortly after 30Km and eventually dropped out after 40Km by which time he was almost 20 minutes behind Gauder. Both Yakovlev and Meisch were disqualified, and Gauder came home the winner by two minutes from Llopart, breaking Kannenberg’s Olympic record by almost seven minutes.
Los Angeles, 11 Aug 1984
(Competitors: 31; Countries: 16)

Final ranking

RankAthleteTimeNote
1st, gold medalist(s)  Raúl González (MEX) 3:47:26  
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Bo Gustafsson (SWE) 3:53:19  
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Sandro Bellucci (ITA) 3:53:45  
4  Reima Salonen (FIN) 3:58:30  
5  Raffaello Ducceschi (ITA) 3:59:26  
6  Carl Schueler (USA) 3:59:46  
7  Jordi Llopart (ESP) 4:03:09  
8  José Pinto (POR) 4:04:42  
9  Manuel Alcalde (ESP) 4:05:47  
10  Ernesto Canto (MEX) 4:07:59  
11  Michael Harvey (AUS) 4:09:18  
12  Dominique Guebey (FRA) 4:13:34  
González – five times the world’s best 50Km man between 1977 and 1982 – was the man to beat, and was the fastest in the field with 3:46:41. Two non-participants – Ronald Weigel (3:43:25) and ’80 winner Gauder (3:45:37) – had beaten him in that race. González was one of six sharing the lead at 20Km, but Martin Bermudez (MEX) and Erling Andersen (NOR) were disqualified. The 20Km specialists Damilano and LeBlanc failed to finish, and Ernesto Canto faded to place 10th. Damilano was the last to drop, some 46 seconds behind González. The Mexican was left with a huge lead, and he won by nearly six minutes from Gustafsson, who got away from Bellucci in the last 3Km. At his fourth Olympics, González finally won the one title to have eluded him in his career.
Seoul, 30 Sep 1988
(Competitors: 42; Countries: 22)

Final ranking

RankAthleteTimeNote
1st, gold medalist(s)  Vyacheslav Ivanenko (URS) 3:38:29 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Ronald Weigel (GDR) 3:38:56  
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Hartwig Gauder (GDR) 3:39:45  
4  Aleksandr Potashov (URS) 3:41:00  
5  José Marín (ESP) 3:43:03  
6  Simon Baker (AUS) 3:44:07  
7  Bo Gustafsson (SWE) 3:44:49  
8  Raffaello Ducceschi (ITA) 3:45:43  
9  Dietmar Meisch (GDR) 3:46:31  
10  Pavol Szikora (TCH) 3:47:04  
11  Giovanni Perricelli (ITA) 3:47:14  
12  Pavol Blažek (TCH) 3:47:31
The pace was set by veteran Martin Bermudez (MEX) and his teammate Hernan Andrade, with Andrade leading at 20Km by 14 seconds in 1:29:47. The pack was another half minute behind. Andrade was disqualified at 22Km, leaving Bermudez a minute ahead at halfway in 1:51:58. The pack began to increase their pace, and were just six seconds behind Bermudez (2:14:25) at 30Km. The Mexican was soon engulfed by the leaders, and eventually finished 15th in a solid 3:49:22. Moscow winner Gauder, Weigel and Ivanenko then opened up a 30m gap, with Ivanenko taking a 10m lead at 40Km. The little (1.64/58Kg) Russian went away from the Germans in the last 10Km, producing a final 20Km of 1:23:58 to win by 27 seconds from Weigel, with Gauder third, well ahead of Potashov. The Russian summed up his position succinctly: “I am very satisfied.”
Barcelona, 7 Aug 1992
(Competitors: 42; Countries: 20)

Final classification

  • Held on August 7, 1992
RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Andrey Perlov (EUN) 3:50:13
Med 2.png  Carlos Mercenario (MEX) 3:52:09
Med 3.png  Ronald Weigel (GER) 3:53:45
4.  Valeriy Spitsyn (EUN) 3:54:39
5.  Roman Mrázek (TCH) 3:55:21
6.  Hartwig Gauder (GER) 3:56:47
7.  Valentin Kononen (FIN) 3:57:21
8.  Miguel Rodríguez (MEX) 3:58:26
9.  Josep Marín (ESP) 3:58:41
10.  Jesús Ángel García (ESP) 3:58:43
11.  Stefan Johansson (SWE) 3:58:56
12.  Giuseppe De Gaetano (ITA) 3:59:13
Mercenario and Perlov, who had finished 1-2 in the 1991 World Cup, were considered the best walkers in the event. The field of 43 was still a group of 13 at 20Km, but by 30Km Finland’s Valentin Kononen had broken away to lead by more than 40 seconds. He was caught by Korzeniowski, Perlov and Mercenario within 5Km, and just after 40Km Perlov broke away. He led by more than 40 seconds from Korzeniowski and Mercenario with 5Km to go, with Ronald Weigel nearly two minutes behind. Korzeniowski was disqualified not long after 45Km but was not stopped by officials until reaching the entrance to the stadium. Perlov, the European Champion, added another title with a winning margin of nearly two minutes over Mercenario, as Weigel picked up his third Olympic medal, a bronze, after two silvers.
Atlanta, 2 Aug 1996
(Competitors: 51; Countries: 27)

Results

RANKFINALTIME
Med 1.png  Robert Korzeniowski (POL) 3'43:30
Med 2.png  Mikhail Shchennikov (RUS) 3'43:46
Med 3.png  Valentí Massana (ESP) 3'44:19
4.  Arturo Di Mezza (ITA) 3'44:52
5.  Viktor Ginko (BLR) 3'45:27
6.  Ignacio Zamudio (MEX) 3'46:07
7.  Valentin Kononen (FIN) 3'47:40
8.  Sergey Korepanov (KAZ) 3'48:42
9.  Daniel García (MEX) 3'50:05
10.  Tim Berrett (CAN) 3'51:28
11.  Aleksandar Raković (YUG) 3'51:31
12.  Axel Noack (GER) 3'51:55
Valentí Massana, attempting to redeem himself after failing in the 20Km, led by 35 seconds at 10Km, and by 27 seconds at 20Km, before being caught by Korzeniowski, Ginko and Tim Berrett (CAN) just prior to 30Km. Four others were in contact, but by 40Km only Korzeniowski, Massana, Zamudio and Daniel Garcia (MEX) were together, with Viktor Ginko 25m back. Frequently disqualified in the past (’92 Olympics, ’93 World Championships), Korzeniowski went clear with 7Km to go and managed to hold off Shchennikov, previously a 10 or 20Km specialist. The Russian gained 12 seconds in the last 10Km on Korzeniowski, catching Massana 2Km before the finish.
Sydney, 29 Sep 2000
(Entries 56; Countries: 30)

Results

PlaceAthleteNationTimeRecord
1 Robert Korzeniowski Poland 3:42:22  
2 Aigars Fadejevs Latvia 3:43:40  
3 Joel Sanchez Mexico 3:44:36 PB
4 Valentí Massana Spain 3:46:01  
5 Nikolay Matyukhin Russia 3:46:37  
6 Nathan Deakes Australia 3:47:29 PB
7 Miguel Angel Rodriguez Mexico 3:48:12  
8 Roman Magdziarczyk Poland 3:48:17 PB
9 Modris Liepins Latvia 3:48:36  
10 Yang Yongjian China 3:48:42 PB
11 Aleksandar Raković Yugoslavia 3:49:16 SB
12 Jesus Angel Garcia Spain 3:49:31  
Korzeniowski was endeavouring to become the first man to win two consecutive 50Km titles, and followed Sánchez closely until 40k when he surged away to win by over a minute from Fadeyevs. The Latvian moved passed Sánchez in the later stages, but the Mexican was a clear winner of the bronze medal in a personal best time. Disqualifications were more rife in this event (with 8) than in the 20k, but less controversial. The winner became the first road walker to win a third Olympic gold.
Athens, 27 Aug 2004
(Competitors: 54; Countries: 31)

Results

RankNameNationalityResultNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Robert Korzeniowski Poland 3:38:46  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Denis Nizhegorodov Russia 3:42:50  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Aleksey Voyevodin Russia 3:43:34  
4 Yu Chaohong China 3:43:45  
5 Jesús Angel García Spain 3:44:42 SB
6 Roman Magdziarczyk Poland 3:48:11  
7 Grzegorz Sudoł Poland 3:49:09 PB
8 Santiago Pérez Spain 3:49:48 SB
9 Yuriy Andronov Russia 3:50:28  
10 A Latangadasu China 3:51:55  
11 Aigars Fadejevs Latvia 3:52:52  
12 Jefferson Pérez Ecuador 3:53:04 NR
Even before the race began, Korzeniowski was widely regarded as the greatest walker of all-time. The race quickly developed into a battle between the quartet of Korzeniowski, Yu, Nizhegorodov and Deakes, fresh from his 20Km medal performance. The four stayed together until 30Km, when Korzeniowski began to apply the pressure. His next 5Km was 21:15, the fastest of the race, and he opened up a gap of 30 seconds over Nizhegorodov. Yu was another 20 seconds back, while Deakes dropped out. The Chinese contender fell back quickly and was overtaken for bronze by Voyevodin in the last 150m of the race. The gap between first and second was just under a minute at 40Km, 1:32 at 45Km, and more than four minutes by the finish. Korzeniowski’s halves were a remarkably even 1:49:18/1:49:28. In winning the Pole became the first man other than field event athletes to win three consecutive individual gold medals. Over three Olympiads the Polish star had walked almost 260Km and won four golds in all.
Beijing, 22 Aug 2008
 (Competitors: 59 Countries: 32)

Results

RankAthleteNationalityTimeNotes
1st, gold medalist(s) Alex Schwazer Italy 3:37:09 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Jared Tallent Australia 3:39:27 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Denis Nizhegorodov Russia 3:40:14  
4 Jesús Ángel García Spain 3:44:08 SB
5 Erik Tysse Norway 3:45:21 PB
6 Horacio Nava Mexico 3:45:21 PB
7 Yuki Yamazaki Japan 3:45:47  
8 Rafał Fedaczyński Poland 3:46:51 PB
9 Grzegorz Sudoł Poland 3:47:18  
10 Luke Adams Australia 3:47:45 PB
11 Antonio Pereira Portugal 3:48:12 NR
12 André Höhne Germany 3:49:52  
The pre-Olympic leaders were world record breaker Nizhegorodov and Schwazer who had placed a frustrated third in the 2007 World Championships, after holding back on the advice of his coach. On this occasion Schwazer stayed in the lead pack of Nizhegorodov, Tallent, and Li Jianbo (CHN) until 40Km, by which time the Chinese walker had dropped back. The Italian broke away shortly after, moving 40 seconds clear by 45Km, and more than trebling that margin in the last 5Km. Tallent completed a Korzeniowski-like double to win silver six days after his 20Km bronze, while Nizhegorodov dropped one place from Athens. Behind him Garcia and Tysse raced through the field, Garcia having placed 11th at halfway, and Tysse 15th.
London, 11 Aug 2012
(Competitors: 63; Countries: 39)

Result

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes[11]
  Sergey Kirdyapkin Russia 3:35:59* OR DQ
1st, gold medalist(s) Jared Tallent Australia 3:36:53 PB
2nd, silver medalist(s) Si Tianfeng China 3:37:16 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Robert Heffernan Ireland 3:37:54 NR
  Igor Yerokhin Russia 3:37:54 PB DQ
  Sergey Bakulin Russia 3:38:55 DQ
4 Li Jianbo China 3:39:01 PB
5 Matej Tóth Slovakia 3:41:24  
6 Łukasz Nowak Poland 3:42:47 PB
7 Kōichirō Morioka Japan 3:43:14 PB
8 André Höhne Germany 3:44:26 SB
9 Bertrand Moulinet France 3:45:35 PB
10 Park Chil-sung South Korea 3:45:55 NR
11 Ivan Trotski Belarus 3:46:09 PB
12 Jarkko Kinnunen Finland 3:46:25 PB

The biggest initial shock of the event came a week before the Games, when defending champion Alex Schwazer (ITA) was withdrawn and admitted taking drugs earlier in the year. He was ultimately banned for three years. Another surprise was the disqualification of double European Champion Yohann Diniz (FRA) for taking sustenance at a location other than the official refreshment station. The race itself was led at a good pace by the Russians, with Sergey Kirdyapkin and Sergey Bakulin alternating the lead through splits of 44:15 and 1:27:44, before Bakulin opened a 30m gap at the 30km mark. Si caught Bakulin just before 35km, and led by a second, with Kirdyapkin a further 20 seconds back in eighth place. However, Kirdyapkin was gathering himself for a winning assault. At 40km he had overtaken Si, and went almost a minute clear by the finish. Tallent won his second successive silver medal in the event. The Australian had moved from seventh at 35km to second with 5km to go. The result was 1, Kirdyapkin in an Olympic record 3:35:59; 2 Tallent 3:36:53; 3, Si 3:37:16. In all, 25 went under 3:50, with 14 men setting lifetime bests.

Those totals now stand at 22 and 12, because this race of unprecedented quality was comprehensively tainted by the disqualification of all three Russians for doping violations. First in 2013 Igor Yerokhin, who was originally fifth with 3:37:54. Abnormalities were found in the haematological profile of his Athlete Biological Passport dating back to
February 2011. Four years later, Kirdyapkin and Bakulin (originally sixth in 3:38:55) were two of five Russian race walkers who were heavily banned by the Russian Anti-Doping Agency due to irregularities in their own biological passports. The RUSADA set initial disqualification periods including times before London 2012 but not the Games themselves. The IAAF appealed against these “selective” punishments which meant, for instance, that Kirdyapkin kept his Olympic title despite having all his qualifying performances annulled. In March 2016, the Court of Arbitration for Sport upheld the IAAF’s appeal and therefore confirmed the annulment of the London 2012 results of Kirdyapkin and Bakulin. On March 24, 2016 Jared Tallent tweeted “History has been rewritten .... I am Olympic champion!”. As at June 10, 2016 the IOC had yet to publicly confirm all medal re-allocations. However, on May 7, 2016 Athletics Australia reported that Tallent was
due to receive his gold medal in Melbourne on June 17, 2016.

Rio de Janeiro, 19 Aug 2016
(Competitors: 63; Countries: 35)

Results

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
1st place, gold medalist(s) Matej Tóth  Slovakia 3:40:58  
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Jared Tallent  Australia 3:41:16 SB
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Hirooki Arai  Japan 3:41:24 SB
4 Evan Dunfee  Canada 3:41:38 NR
5 Yu Wei  China 3:43:00  
6 Robert Heffernan  Ireland 3:43:55  
7 Håvard Haukenes  Norway 3:46:33 PB
8 Yohann Diniz  France 3:46:43  
9 Caio Bonfim  Brazil 3:47:02 NR
10 Chris Erickson  Australia 3:48:40 PB
11 Wang Zhendong  China 3:48:50  
12 Quentin Rew  New Zealand 3:49:32  

Off the start line, Vladimir Savanović went for the lead putting an immediate gap on the field and getting four minutes of worldwide television time. Before the first kilometre was over, world record holder Yohann Diniz lost his tolerance for the breakaway and went after Savanović, quickly bridging the gap. Savanovic was already showing signs of fading and disappeared back into the pack. Diniz stayed out front. Over the first 4 kilometres, the race broke up, with a lead pack of about nine separating from the larger pack of the field, with a smaller group of four stuck in between. The lead pack at 5K, already 29 seconds behind Diniz, consisted of Matej Tóth, Jared Tallent Evan Dunfee, Robert Heffernan, Andres Chocho, Horacio Nava, Yu Wei, Takayuki Tanii and Matteo Giupponi. Hirooki Arai bridged the gap and joined the lead pack.

The gap stayed consistent through 10K, but the next 5K, Diniz accelerated his pace, opening up the gap to 55 seconds. Diniz began to pick up lapped walkers already. By 20K, the pack was 1:24 behind Diniz and had over 2 minutes on the next group, with no stragglers in between. Leading up to the half way mark, Toth made a test surge, but Dunfee and the rest of the pack pulled it back except Tanii who fell off the back. Diniz had a 1:41 advantage at half way. Dunfee was the next to attack, picking up the pace by some 20 seconds over the next 5K. The back began to string out behind with Toth trying to cover the move, Tallent leading Heffernan, Arai, Yu and Chocho as the others remaining in contact. Dunfee broke away from the pack and continued to take time out of the gap to Diniz, bringing it down to 1:15.

Suddenly at the 33K mark, Diniz stopped in front of his coach. For an agonizing 1:15 Diniz stood by the railing. When Dunfee arrived, he patted Diniz on the pack and Diniz joined Dunfee in the lead. It was only until the next water stop that Diniz was able to struggle to stay with Dunfee, then the gap began to grow. Within the next half kilometre Chocho was shown the red paddle, asking him off the course. Before the 35K mark, Heffernan began to lose contact, further shrinking the pack. Diniz was caught by the next water stop, where he tried to join the back of the pack. Another 2 minutes and Diniz stopped again, falling backward onto the pavement, lying on the street. Attendants rushed to him with ice and water. Within 30 seconds, Diniz was back on his feet racing, now well behind the pack of four (Toth, Tallent, Arai and Yu) and even the straggler Heffernan. Coming in to the 39K mark, the pack quickly pulled in Dunfee. During the next kilometre, Tallent was the next to attack, Arai tried to cover the move for a short distance but fell back to the pack. With the new injection of speed, Yu fell off the back. With Tallent pulling away, Toth and Arai walked together as Dunfee fell off the back. For the next 7K, Tallent extended his lead. Around 44K, Toth started to separate from Arai.

During the last half of the penultimate lap, Toth noticeably began to gain on Tallent, passing him just before the bell and pulling away. Behind them Dunfee began to see Arai come back into range. Within the next 500 metres, Dunfee had passed Arai. After falling back about 10 metres, Arai surged back on Dunfee but as he passed, Arai didn't use the width of the street, instead almost going deliberately at Dunfee's left side. The two made contact twice, Dunfee being knocked off stride as Arai suddenly gained a 10-metre advantage. A tired Dunfee struggled to find his form. Toth had built up enough of a lead he was celebrating before the crowd, accepting a Slovak flag more than 100 metres before the finish. Arai was gaining on Tallent but Tallent managed to hold his form together long enough to cross six seconds ahead of Arai. Dunfee wobbled across the finish line 14 seconds later, collapsing past the finish line. The first four finished within 40 seconds.

While Toth continued to celebrate on his feet, medical attendants had to deal with the other three finishers exhausted on the ground at the finish line. Another five minutes and four more finishers later, Diniz crossed the finish line after struggling and stopping multiple times. 19 seconds after Diniz, Caio Bonfim crossed the line to a big cheer setting the new Brazilian record. Dunfee had also set the Canadian record. After the race, Athletics Canada filed a protest based on the contact with Arai, resulting in Arai's disqualification with Dunfee being awarded third place and the bronze medal. That decision was then appealed by Japan Association of Athletics Federations and was reversed.

50 kilometres Walk (Men's) Progression of Olympic Record

  
Men                  
50 kilometres walk
4.50.10   1     Tommy Green   GBR Los Angeles 1932
4.30.42 4.30.41.4 1     Harold Whitlock   GBR Berlin 1936
4.28.08 4.28.07.8 1     Giuseppe “Pino” Dordoni   ITA Helsinki 1952
4.25.30   1     Donald Thompson   GBR Rome 1960
4.11.13 4.11.12.4 1     Abdon Pamich   ITA Tokyo 1964
3.56.12 3.56.11.57 1     Bernd Kannenberg   FRG Munich 1972
3.49.24 3.49.23.40 1     Hartwig Gauder   GDR Moscow 1980
3.47.26   1     Raúl González   MEX Los Angeles 1984
3.38.29   1     Vyacheslav Ivanenko   URS Seoul 1988
3.37.09   1     Alex Schwazer   ITA Beijing 2008
3.36.53   1     Jared Tallent   AUS Rio de Janeiro
2016

50 kilometres Walk (Men's) 200 All time Best Perfomances

  

 
  50 km walk                  
1 3.36.53   Jared Tallent 17 Oct 1984 Australia AUS 2 Final London 11 August 2012
2 3.37.09   Alex Schwazer 26 Dec 1984 Italy ITA 1 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
3 3.37.16   Si Tianfeng 17 Jun 1984 China CHN 3 Final London 11 August 2012
4 3.37.54   Robert Heffernan 20 Feb 1978 Ireland IRL 4 Final London 11 August 2012
5 3.38.29   Vyacheslav Ivanenko 1 Mar 1961 Soviet Union URS 1 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
6 3.38.46   Robert Korzeniowski 30 Jul 1968 Poland POL 1 Final Athens 27 August 2004
7 3.38.55   Sergey Bakulin 13 Nov 1986 Russia RUS 5 Final London 11 August 2012
8 3.38.56   Ronald Weigel 8 Aug 1959 East Germany GDR 2 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
9 3.39.01   Li Jianbo 14 Nov 1986 China CHN 6 Final London 11 August 2012
10 3.39.27   Jared Tallent 17 Oct 1984 Australia AUS 2 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
11 3.39.45   Hartwig Gauder 10 Nov 1954 East Germany GDR 3 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
12 3.40.14   Denis Nizhegorodov 26 Jul 1980 Russia RUS 3 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
13 3.40.58   Matej Tóth 10 Feb 1983   SVK 1 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
14 3.41.00   Aleksandr Potashov 12 Mar 1962 Soviet Union URS 4 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
15 3.41.16   Jared Tallent 17 Oct 1984   AUS 2 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
16 3.41.24   Matej Tóth 10 Feb 1983 Slovakia SVK 7 Final London 11 August 2012
17 3.41.24   Hiroki Arai 18 May 1988   JPN 3 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
18 3.41.38   Evan Dunfee 28 Sep 1990   CAN 4 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
19 3.42.22   Robert Korzeniowski 30 Jul 1968 Poland POL 1 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
20 3.42.47   Łukasz Nowak 18 Dec 1988 Poland POL 8 Final London 11 August 2012
21 3.42.50   Denis Nizhegorodov 26 Jul 1980 Russia RUS 2 Final Athens 27 August 2004
22 3.43.00   Yu Wei 11 Sep 1987   CHN 5 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
23 3.43.03   José Marín 20 Jan 1950 Spain ESP 5 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
24 3.43.14   Koichiro Morioka 2 Apr 1985 Japan JPN 9 Final London 11 August 2012
25 3.43.30   Robert Korzeniowski 30 Jul 1968 Poland POL 1 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
26 3.43.34   Aleksey Voyevodin 9 Aug 1970 Russia RUS 3 Final Athens 27 August 2004
27 3.43.40   Aigars Fadejevs 27 Dec 1975 Latvia LAT 2 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
28 3.43.45   Yu Chaohong 12 Dec 1976 China CHN 4 Final Athens 27 August 2004
29 3.43.46   Mikhail Shchennikov 24 Dec 1967 Russia RUS 2 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
30 3.43.55   Robert Heffernan 20 Feb 1978   IRL 6 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
31 3.44.07   Simon Baker 6 Feb 1958 Australia AUS 6 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
32 3.44.08   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969 Spain ESP 4 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
33 3.44.19   Valentí Massana 5 Jul 1970 Spain ESP 3 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
34 3.44.26   André Höhne 10 Mar 1978 Germany GER 10 Final London 11 August 2012
35 3.44.36   Joel Sánchez 16 Mar 1974 Mexico MEX 3 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
36 3.44.42   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969 Spain ESP 5 Final Athens 27 August 2004
37 3.44.49   Bo Gustafsson 29 Sep 1954 Sweden SWE 7 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
38 3.44.52   Arturo Di Mezza 16 Jul 1969 Italy ITA 4 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
39 3.45.08   Erik Tysse 4 Dec 1980 Norway NOR 5 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
40 3.45.21   Horacio Nava 20 Jan 1982 Mexico MEX 6 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
41 3.45.27   Viktar Ginko 7 Dec 1965 Belarus BLR 5 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
42 3.45.35   Bertrand Moulinet 6 Jan 1987 France FRA 11 Final London 11 August 2012
43 3.45.43   Raffaello Ducceschi 25 Feb 1962 Italy ITA 8 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
44 3.45.47   Yuki Yamazaki 16 Jan 1984 Japan JPN 7 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
45 3.45.55   Park Chil-Sung 8 Jul 1982 South Korea KOR 12 Final London 11 August 2012
46 3.46.01   Valentí Massana 5 Jul 1970 Spain ESP 4 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
47 3.46.07   Ignacio Zamudio 15 May 1971 Mexico MEX 6 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
48 3.46.09   Ivan Trotski 27 May 1976 Belarus BLR 13 Final London 11 August 2012
49 3.46.25   Jarkko Kinnunen 19 Jan 1984 Finland FIN 14 Final London 11 August 2012
50 3.46.31   Dietmar Meisch 10 Feb 1959 East Germany GDR 9 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
51 3.46.33   Håvard Haukenes 22 Apr 1990   NOR 7 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
52 3.46.37   Nikolay Matyukhin 13 Dec 1968 Russia RUS 5 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
53 3.46.43   Yohann Diniz 1 Jan 1978   FRA 8 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
54 3.46.51   Rafał Fedaczyński 3 Dec 1980 Poland POL 8 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
55 3.46.59   Horacio Nava 20 Jan 1982 Mexico MEX 15 Final London 11 August 2012
56 3.47.02   Caio Bonfim 19 Mar 1991   BRA 9 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
57 3.47.04   Pavol Szikora 26 Mar 1952 Czechoslovakia TCH 10 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
58 3.47.14   Giovanni Perricelli 25 Aug 1967 Italy ITA 11 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
59 3.47.18   Grzegorz Sudoł 28 Aug 1978 Poland POL 9 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
60 3.47.19   Marco De Luca 12 May 1981 Italy ITA 16 Final London 11 August 2012
61 3.47.26   Raúl González 29 Feb 1952 Mexico MEX 1 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
62 3.47.29   Nathan Deakes 17 Aug 1977 Australia AUS 6 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
63 3.47.31   Pavol Blazek 9 Jul 1958 Czechoslovakia TCH 12 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
64 3.47.40   Valentin Kononen 7 Mar 1969 Finland FIN 7 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
65 3.47.45   Luke Adams 22 Oct 1976 Australia AUS 10 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
66 3.47.47   Rafał Sikora 17 Feb 1987 Poland POL 17 Final London 11 August 2012
67 3.48.07   Ihor Hlavan 25 Sep 1990 Ukraine UKR 18 Final London 11 August 2012
68 3.48.09   Jorge Llopart 5 May 1952 Spain ESP 13 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
69 3.48.11   Roman Magdziarczyk 5 Jul 1977 Poland POL 6 Final Athens 27 August 2004
70 3.48.12   Miguel Angel Rodríguez 15 Jan 1967 Mexico MEX 7 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
71 3.48.12   António Pereira 10 Jul 1975 Portugal POR 11 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
72 3.48.15   François Lapointe 23 Aug 1961 Canada CAN 14 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
73 3.48.17   Roman Magdziarczyk 5 Jul 1977 Poland POL 8 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
74 3.48.32   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969 Spain ESP 19 Final London 11 August 2012
75 3.48.36   Modris Liepiņš 3 Aug 1966 Latvia LAT 9 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
76 3.48.37   Trond Nymark 28 Dec 1976 Norway NOR 20 Final London 11 August 2012
77 3.48.40   Chris Erickson 1 Dec 1981   AUS 10 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
78 3.48.42   Sergey Korepanov 9 May 1964 Kazakhstan KAZ 8 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
79 3.48.42   Yang Yongjian 28 Apr 1973 China CHN 10 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
80 3.48.45   Nathan Deakes 17 Aug 1977 Australia AUS 21 Final London 11 August 2012
81 3.48.50   Wang Zhendong 11 Jan 1991   CHN 11 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
82 3.49.09   Grzegorz Sudoł 28 Aug 1978 Poland POL 7 Final Athens 27 August 2004
83 3.49.14   Omar Zepeda 8 Jul 1977 Mexico MEX 22 Final London 11 August 2012
84 3.49.16   Aleksandar Raković 13 Apr 1968 Yugoslavia YUG 11 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
85 3.49.19   Christopher Linke 24 Oct 1988 Germany GER 23 Final London 11 August 2012
86 3.49.22   Martín Bermúdez 19 Jul 1958 Mexico MEX 15 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
87 3.49.24   Hartwig Gauder 10 Nov 1954 East Germany GDR 1 Final Moscow 30 July 1980
88 3.49.31   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969 Spain ESP 12 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
89 3.49.32   Quentin Rew 16 Jul 1984   NZL 12 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
90 3.49.48   Santiago Pérez 15 Jan 1972 Spain ESP 8 Final Athens 27 August 2004
91 3.49.52   André Höhne 10 Mar 1978 Germany GER 12 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
92 3.49.56   Aléxandros Papamihaíl 18 Sep 1988 Greece GRE 24 Final London 11 August 2012
93 3.50.05   Daniel García 28 Oct 1971 Mexico MEX 9 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
94 3.50.13   Andrey Perlov 12 Dec 1961 Russia RUS 1 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
95 3.50.19   Wang Yinhang 15 Feb 1977 China CHN 13 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
96 3.50.28   Yuriy Andronov 6 Nov 1971 Russia RUS 9 Final Athens 27 August 2004
97 3.50.28   Alain Lemercier 11 Jan 1957 France FRA 16 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
98 3.50.46   Roman Mrázek 21 Jan 1962 Czechoslovakia TCH 17 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
99 3.50.53   Horacio Nava 20 Jan 1982   MEX 13 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
100 3.51.00   Takayuki Tanii 14 Feb 1983   JPN 14 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
101 3.51.25   Jorge Llopart 5 May 1952 Spain ESP 2 Final Moscow 30 July 1980
102 3.51.28   Tim Berrett 23 Jan 1965 Canada CAN 10 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
103 3.51.30   Mikel Odriozola 25 May 1973 Spain ESP 13 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
104 3.51.31   Aleksandar Raković 13 Apr 1968 Yugoslavia YUG 11 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
105 3.51.35   Omar Zepeda 8 Jul 1977   MEX 16 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
106 3.51.36   Reima Salonen 19 Nov 1955 Finland FIN 18 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
107 3.51.42   Jorge Armando Ruiz 17 May 1989   COL 17 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
108 3.51.55   Gadasu Alatan 27 Jan 1984 China CHN 10 Final Athens 27 August 2004
109 3.51.55   Axel Noack 23 Sep 1961 Germany GER 12 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
110 3.52.09   Carlos Mercenário 23 May 1967 Mexico MEX 2 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
111 3.52.20   Li Jianbo 14 Nov 1986 China CHN 14 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
112 3.52.25   Jarkko Kinnunen 19 Jan 1984 Finland FIN 15 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
113 3.52.31   Giovanni Perricelli 25 Aug 1967 Italy ITA 13 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
114 3.52.38   Igors Kazakēvičs 17 Apr 1980 Latvia LAT 16 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
115 3.52.52   Aigars Fadejevs 27 Dec 1975 Latvia LAT 11 Final Athens 27 August 2004
116 3.52.56   Denis Langlois 10 Oct 1968 France FRA 14 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
117 3.52.58   Si Tianfeng 17 Jun 1984 China CHN 17 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
118 3.52.58   Jesús Sánchez 26 Oct 1973 Mexico MEX 18 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
119 3.53.04   Jefferson Pérez 1 Jul 1974 Ecuador ECU 12 Final Athens 27 August 2004
120 3.53.10   Zhang Huiqiang 14 Oct 1977 China CHN 14 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
121 3.53.19   Bo Gustafsson 29 Sep 1954 Sweden SWE 2 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
122 3.53.20   Trond Nymark 28 Dec 1976 Norway NOR 13 Final Athens 27 August 2004
123 3.53.22   Serhiy Budza 6 Dec 1984   UKR 18 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
124 3.53.23   Andrew Jachno 13 Apr 1962 Australia AUS 19 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
125 3.53.30   Sergey Korepanov 9 May 1964 Kazakhstan KAZ 15 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
126 3.53.34   Stefan Johansson 11 Apr 1967 Sweden SWE 20 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
127 3.53.41   Luke Adams 22 Oct 1976 Australia AUS 25 Final London 11 August 2012
128 3.53.45   Ronald Weigel 8 Aug 1959 Germany GER 3 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
129 3.53.45   Sandro Bellucci 21 Feb 1955 Italy ITA 3 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
130 3.53.48   Miloš Holuša 2 May 1965 Czech Republic CZE 16 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
131 3.53.57   Émerson Hernández 20 Jan 1989 El Salvador ESA 26 Final London 11 August 2012
132 3.53.59   Brendan Boyce 15 Oct 1986   IRL 19 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
133 3.54.22   Peter Korčok 12 Aug 1974 Slovakia SVK 14 Final Athens 27 August 2004
134 3.54.29   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969   ESP 20 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
135 3.54.39   Valeriy Spitsyn 5 Dec 1965 Russia RUS 4 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
136 3.54.40   Marco De Luca 12 May 1981   ITA 21 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
137 3.54.47   Peter Tichý 12 Mar 1969 Slovakia SVK 17 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
138 3.54.47   Marco De Luca 12 May 1981 Italy ITA 19 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
139 3.54.48   Thomas Wallstab 29 Jan 1968 Germany GER 15 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
140 3.54.57   Héctor Moreno 8 Jun 1963 Colombia COL 16 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
141 3.55.00   José Ojeda 12 Nov 1985 Mexico MEX 27 Final London 11 August 2012
142 3.55.01   Brendan Boyce 15 Oct 1986 Ireland IRL 28 Final London 11 August 2012
143 3.55.01   Rafał Augustyn 14 May 1984   POL 22 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
144 3.55.03   Quentin Rew 16 Jul 1984 New Zealand NZL 29 Final London 11 August 2012
145 3.55.16   Cédric Houssaye 13 Dec 1979 France FRA 30 Final London 11 August 2012
146 3.55.19   Antti Kempas 3 Oct 1980 Finland FIN 20 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
147 3.55.21   Roman Mrázek 21 Jan 1962 Slovakia SVK 5 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
148 3.55.32   Marc Mundell 7 Jul 1983 South Africa RSA 31 Final London 11 August 2012
149 3.55.43   Miguel Angel Rodríguez 15 Jan 1967 Mexico MEX 15 Final Athens 27 August 2004
150 3.55.43   Jarkko Kinnunen 19 Jan 1984   FIN 23 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
151 3.55.51   Rafał Fedaczyński 3 Dec 1980   POL 24 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
152 3.55.53   Craig Barrett 16 Nov 1971 New Zealand NZL 18 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
153 3.55.57   José Pinto 19 Jun 1956 Portugal POR 21 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
154 3.56.00   Fredy Hernández 24 Apr 1978 Colombia COL 32 Final London 11 August 2012
155 3.56.07   José Ojeda 12 Nov 1985   MEX 25 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
156 3.56.12   Bernd Kannenberg 20 Aug 1942 West Germany FRG 1 Final Munich 3 September 1972
157 3.56.19   Mike Trautmann 13 Mar 1974 Germany GER 19 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
158 3.56.27   Julio Urías 11 Jan 1972 Guatemala GUA 17 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
159 3.56.32   Yevgeniy Ivchenko 27 Jul 1938 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Moscow 30 July 1980
160 3.56.34   Yim Jung-Hyun 8 Sep 1987 South Korea KOR 33 Final London 11 August 2012
161 3.56.35   Serhiy Budza 6 Dec 1984 Ukraine UKR 34 Final London 11 August 2012
162 3.56.44   Štefan Malík 11 Feb 1966 Slovakia SVK 20 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
163 3.56.47   Hartwig Gauder 10 Nov 1954 Germany GER 6 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
164 3.56.47   Zhao Chengliang 1 Jun 1984 China CHN 21 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
165 3.56.48   Basant Bahadur Rana 18 Jan 1984 India IND 35 Final London 11 August 2012
166 3.56.55   Marco Evoniuk 30 Sep 1957 United States USA 22 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
167 3.56.58   Luis García 13 Sep 1974 Guatemala GUA 22 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
168 3.56.59   Zhao Jianguo 19 Jan 1988 China CHN 36 Final London 11 August 2012
169 3.57.00   Yuki Yamazaki 16 Jan 1984 Japan JPN 16 Final Athens 27 August 2004
170 3.57.08   Bengt Simonsen 23 Mar 1958 Sweden SWE 4 Final Moscow 30 July 1980
171 3.57.21   Valentin Kononen 7 Mar 1969 Finland FIN 7 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
172 3.57.33   Kim Dong-Young 6 Mar 1980 South Korea KOR 37 Final London 11 August 2012
173 3.57.44   Carl Schueler 26 Feb 1956 United States USA 23 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
174 3.57.47   Germán Sánchez 31 Jul 1967 Mexico MEX 18 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
175 3.57.52   Marius Cocioran 10 Jul 1983 Romania ROU 38 Final London 11 August 2012
176 3.58.00   René Piller 23 Apr 1965 France FRA 19 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
177 3.58.04   Mario Iván Flores 28 Feb 1979 Mexico MEX 23 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
178 3.58.14   Denis Trautmann 15 Aug 1972 Germany GER 21 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
179 3.58.20   Roman Mrázek 21 Jan 1962 Slovakia SVK 20 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
180 3.58.21   Serhiy Budza 6 Dec 1984 Ukraine UKR 24 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
181 3.58.24   Venyamin Soldatenko 4 Jan 1939 Soviet Union URS 2 Final Munich 3 September 1972
182 3.58.25   Dušan Majdán 8 Sep 1987   SVK 26 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
183 3.58.26   Miguel Angel Rodríguez 15 Jan 1967 Mexico MEX 8 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
184 3.58.30   Reima Salonen 19 Nov 1955 Finland FIN 4 Final Los Angeles 11 August 1984
185 3.58.31   Jacek Bednarek 27 Jan 1964 Poland POL 24 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
186 3.58.32   Vyacheslav Fursov 19 Jul 1954 Soviet Union URS 5 Final Moscow 30 July 1980
187 3.58.33   Germán Sánchez 31 Jul 1967 Mexico MEX 17 Final Athens 27 August 2004
188 3.58.39   Curt Clausen 9 Oct 1967 United States USA 22 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
189 3.58.40   Štefan Malík 11 Feb 1966 Slovakia SVK 21 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
190 3.58.41   José Marín 20 Jan 1950 Spain ESP 9 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
191 3.58.43   Jesús Ángel García 17 Oct 1969 Spain ESP 10 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
192 3.58.46   Peter Korčok 12 Aug 1974 Slovakia SVK 23 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
193 3.58.56   Stefan Johansson 11 Apr 1967 Sweden SWE 11 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
194 3.58.59   Pedro Isidro 17 Jul 1985 Portugal POR 39 Final London 11 August 2012
195 3.58.59   Koichiro Morioka 2 Apr 1985   JPN 27 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
196 3.59.11   Miloš Bátovský 26 May 1979 Slovakia SVK 18 Final Athens 27 August 2004
197 3.59.13   Giuseppe De Gaetano 4 Oct 1966 Italy ITA 12 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
198 3.59.13   Manuel Alcalde 31 Dec 1956 Spain ESP 25 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
199 3.59.21   Aléxandros Papamihaíl 18 Sep 1988   GRE 28 Final Rio de Janeiro 19 August 2016
200 3.59.23   Vitaliy Popovich 22 Oct 1962 Soviet Union URS 26 Final Seoul 30 September 1988
 
   
 Pefomances annulled cause of doping  
 
  3.35.59   Sergey Kirdyapkin 18 Jun 1980 Russia RUS 1 Final London 11 August 2012
  3.37.54   Igor Yerokhin 04 Sep 1985 Russia RUS 5 Final London 11 August 2012
 

 

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