Sport-Olympic.com

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

All Athletics Menu

3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events

Olympic Events in Athletics - Long Jump (Women's)

Long Jump (Women's)

 
First Gold Medalist
 Olga_Gyarmati.jpg
 HUN Olga Gyarmati
 

Games: 18 games in 15 countries
First Held: 1948 Summer Games
Last Held: 2016 Summer Games

Participants: 414 from 95 countries
Top Athlete Medalist(s): GDR GER Heike Drechsler and USA Jackie Joyner-Kersee (3 medals)
Top Country Medalist(s): USA United States and URS Soviet Union (9 medals)

Long Jump for Women at Olympics

Long Jump for Women at Olympics: Long jump is also referred to as "broad jump". The event is categorized under the horizontal jumping events in the field athletics competitions. The long jumpers try to jump as far as possible from the take off point. The landing area used in the event is usually filled with ground gravel or sand. The action of the long jump comprises of four parts-the approach run, the last two strides, take off and the movement in air and landing. Speed is the key of success in the long jump. Apart from speed, athletes have to possess great power and swiftness to excel in the event. The event was contested by the women for the first time in 1895. However, the event was internationally recognized as a women's sport much later.

Long Jump for Women in Summer Olympics: Long Jump was introduced to the women's athletics program during the 1948 London Summer Games. Since then, the event has been contested regularly at the Olympics.

Rules for Long Jump for Women at Olympics: The International Association of Athletics Federations or IAAF sets rules for the track and field athletics events. The rules, which are followed during the long jump competitions, are-

 
  • The design of the take-off board and the material of it have been determined by the IAAF.
  • The IAAF has specified the distance between the take-off line and the end of the landing area. The distance has been fixed to a minimum of 10 meter.
  • The width of the landing area generally varies between 2.75 meter and 3 meter.
  • The landing area has to be filled with soft damp sand.
  • Athletes are not permitted to touch the ground outside the take-off line and before the landing area. An athlete offending this rule is readily disqualified from the competition.
  • The length of the jump taken by the athlete is measured from the take off line to the point of contact in the landing area.

Medal Winners in the Long Jump for Women at Olympics: Some of the athletes, who excelled in the domain of long jump at the international level, are Marion Jones, Yelena Khlopotnova, Tatyana Lebedeva, Inessa Kravets, Yelena Belevskaya, Tatyana Kotova, Anisoara Stanciu, Heike Drechsler, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Galina Chistyakova, Tatyana Kolpakova, Angela Voigt, Heide Rosendahl, Viorica Viscopoleanu, Mary Rand, Vera Krepkina, Elzbieta Krzesinska, Yvette Williams and Olga Gyarmati.

JOYNER KERSEEJACKIE Seoul88 1250x750

Olympic history: Women’s long jump

A look back at the women’s long jump as Steve Smythe reflects on the history of events at the Olympics

The long jump has a relatively long Olympic history for a women’s event and has featured some of the world’s greatest athletes in the sport.

The Rio event looks wide open and British success looks feasible based on Shara Proctor’s superb silver in the Beijing World Championships. And it isn’t a single-pronged attack as both Lorraine Ugen and Katarina Johnson-Thompson are also potential medallists.

USA should have the strongest team with five jumpers over 6.93m last summer, including world champion Tianna Bartoletta and defending champion Brittney Reese.

1948-2012

The first women’s Olympic champion was Hungary’s Olga Gyarmati. Her mark was more than 55 centimetres down on absent world record-holder Fanny Blankers-Koen’s 6.25m. The Dutch athlete nevertheless won four golds in London though.

The world record only just survived in Helsinki in 1952 when New Zealand’s Yvette Williams won with 6.24m. It was especially noteworthy as she fouled her first two jumps and needed a ‘do or die’ third jump of 5.90m to qualify for the top eight.

Williams also finished in the top 10 in shot and discus and runner-up Aleksandra Chudina was even more versatile, winning silver at long jump and javelin and a bronze in the high jump. However, it was widely believed the masculine-looking Soviet, who was also a champion speed skater and volleyball player, would not have passed any gender tests had they been in existence.

The clear winner in Melbourne in 1956 was Poland’s Elzbieta Krsesinska, who equalled her own world record of 6.35m. A distant second was 17-year-old Willye White of the USA.

In Rome in 1960, the Pole was expected to battle with new world record-holder Hildrun Claus or Britain’s Mary Bignal, who headed qualifying with 6.34m. However, the gold surprisingly went to Soviet Vera Krepkina, who was joint world record-holder in the 100m. The 11.3 sprinter won with 6.37m with Krsesinska second and Claus third.

That 6.37m would have only been good enough for fifth in 1964 in Tokyo (see ‘British successes’ below) and outside the top eight in the altitude of Mexico in 1968.

Romanian Viorica Viscopoleanu had been fifth in 1964 but, aided by the altitude in South American city, improved her PB from 6.54m to a world record 6.82m.

Germany’s Heide Rosendahl was eighth in Mexico but was world record-holder by the time of Munich in 1972. She coped with the pressure of being a home favourite well and won with 6.78m, though ultimately she won gold by just a centimetre as Bulgaria’s Diana Yorgova made a huge improvement in second.

In Montreal in 1976, gold was won, for the third Games running, with a first-round jump. This time it was via a 6.72m from Angela Voigt, who had briefly held the world record earlier before losing it to Siegrun Siegl, who was fourth before winning gold in the pentathlon a few days later.

Seven metres was breached in the Olympics for the first time in Moscow in 1980 , but the standard was not as high in Los Angeles in 1984. The Soviet boycott didn’t stop Romania competing and their world record-holder Anisoara Stanciu won with a 6.96m, almost half a metre down on her 7.43m record. Jackie Joyner-Kersee was only fifth but she set an Olympic record of 7.27m in winning gold in the heptathlon.

In the final, the 1983 world champion Heike Daute led from the third round with 7.18m and then jumped 7.22m in the fourth. However, the American responded with a huge Olympic record 7.40m. Daute, better known under her married name of Drechsler, would have won gold in every other long jump before or since with her 7.22m. Joyner-Kersee’s distance would have won a medal in the men’s long jump in 1952.

The American won gold again in the 1991 World Championships but failed to make it four global titles in a row in Barcelona. Drechsler, who admitted to enforced drug-taking in her GDR era, narrowly won with 7.14m as Inessa Kravets and Joyner-Kersee were within five centimetres of her.

The surprise winner in Atlanta in 1996 was Chioma Ajunwa. The accomplished football player – she played for Nigeria in the 1991 World Cup – failed a drugs test in 1992 and returned just in time from her four-year ban to win gold in America with 7.12m. She became Nigeria’s first women’s Olympic champion and the first African woman jumper to win gold. Joyner-Kersee won her third medal, this time a bronze.

Drechsler had missed the 1996 Games with injury and was also absent from the 1999 World Championships. However, she was fit and healthy for Sydney in 2000 and regained the title with 6.99m. Most of the media attention had been on Marion Jones, who had won a sprint double, but she could only finish third, and she later lost the medal due to her admitted drug-taking.

In 2004 in Athens, just two centimetres covered the three medallists with double world triple jump champion Tatyana Lebedeva making up for her disappointing third in her supposed speciality in Greece with a 7.07m victory. It was the first women’s clean sweep since Moscow’s Soviet-dominated 1980s 800m and pentathlon.

Lebedeva just missed out on defending her title in Beijing in 2008 as Brazil’s Maurren Maggi won by a single centimetre.

Brittney Reese, who won the World Championships in 2009, 2011 and 2013, took the Olympic title in London in 2012 with a leap of 7.12m.

Most memorable Olympic long jump: Moscow 1980

The boycott kept away many Western nations such as USA and Germany, but it didn’t affect the quality too much in Moscow, which saw unprecedented long jumps.

The Soviet team was strong, even without Vilma Bardauskienne, who had been the first to breach seven metres but couldn’t make their team.

At the start of the final round, the Soviet Tatyana Skatchko led with a jump of 7.01m, with East Germany’s Brigitte Wujak second with 6.88m and Poland’s Anna Wlodarczyk third with the same distance and Soviet Tatyana Kolpakova fourth on 6.87m.

Wlodarczyk was delighted when she went second with a 6.95m final jump as she thought that had guaranteed a medal. However, Kolpakova smashed her PB with her last jump to go into the lead with 7.06m, Wujak also decimated her PB and snatched silver with 7.04m and the Pole had to settle for fourth.

Long Jump (Women's) History Year by Year (by IAAF) 1896-2012

 ljw-1.JPG  ljw-2.JPG
  
London, 4 Aug 1948
(Competitors: 26; Countries: 17; Finalists: 12)

Final standings

Rank Name Nationality Distance Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Olga Gyarmati Hungary 5.695 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Noemí Simonetto Argentina 5.600  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Ann-Britt Leyman Sweden 5.575  
4 Gerda van der Kade-Koudijs Netherlands 5.570  
5 Nel Karelse Netherlands 5.545  
6 Kathleen Russell Jamaica 5.495  
7 Judy Canty Australia 5.380  
8 Yvonne Chabot-Curtet France 5.350  
9 Maria Oberbreyer-Trösch Austria 5.240  
10 Ilse Steinegger Austria 5.195  
11 Vinton Beckett Jamaica 5.145  
12 Emma Reed United States 4.845  
World record holder Blankers-Koen, with a full schedule, passed on the long jump, leaving it with less lustre than it otherwise would have claimed. Gyarmati, who had jumped 5.99 to top the pre-Olympic lists (ahead of Blankers-Koen’s 5.89), duly won the final with 5.695, after Curtet-Chabot (5.64) and Russell (5.61) had led the qualifying.
Helsinki, 23 Jul 1952
(Competitors: 34; Countries: 22; Finalists: 24)

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality Result
1 Yvette Williams New Zealand 6.24 OR
2 Aleksandra Chudina Soviet Union 6.14
3 Shirley Cawley Great Britain 5.92
4 Irmgard Schmelzer Germany 5.90
5 Willy Lust Netherlands 5.81
6 Nina Tyurkina Soviet Union 5.81
7 Mabel Landry United States 5.75
8 Verna Johnston Australia 5.74
9 Maire Österdahl Finland 5.73
10 Olga Gyarmati Hungary 5.67
11 Valentina Lituyeva Soviet Union 5.65
12 Elżbieta Krzesińska Poland 5.65
Williams, the Empire Champion, was favourite after an early season national record of 6.14, but reigning champion Gyarmati and Chudina (6.05) were also highly regarded. The Kiwi broke her national record with 6.16 in the qualifying round, but had two fouls in the final while Chudina stretched out to a Soviet record 6.14. Williams then reached 5.90 in round 3 to qualify for the final three rounds, before producing the second best jump ever – 6.24 – in round 4, missing Blankers- Koen’s world record by a single centimetre.
Melbourne, 27 Nov 1956
(Competitors: 19; Countries: 11; Finalists: 12)

Final classification

RANK NAME ATHLETE DISTANCE
Med 1.png  Elżbieta Krzesińska (POL) 6.35 m
Med 2.png  Willye White (USA) 6.09 m
Med 3.png  Nadezhda Khnykina-Dvalishvili (URS) 6.07 m
4.  Erika Fisch (EUA) 5.89 m
5.  Marthe Lambert (FRA) 5.88 m
6.  Valentina Shaprunova (URS) 5.85 m
7.  Beverly Weigel (NZL) 5.85 m
8.  Nancy Borwick (AUS) 5.82 m
9.  Maria Kusion (POL) 5.79 m
10.  Helga Hofmann (EUA) 5.73 m
11.  Olga Gyarmati (HUN) 5.66 m
12.  Genowefa Minicka (POL) 5.64 m
Krzesińska was favourite, on the basis of her 6.35 world record in August, and she led the qualifiers with 6.13. The second to jump in the final, the Pole quickly settled matters with a jump of 6.20; only Dvalishvili was able to reach 6.00 in response. Krzesińska made the position even clearer with her next jump, which was ratified as equalling her world record though the wind reading was +6.0! Only Dvalishvili and 17 year-old Willye White managed jumps beyond 6m, with White snatching silver from the Georgian with her last jump of 6.09.
Rome, 31 Aug 1960
(Competitors: 30; Countries: 19; Finalists: 19)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Mark Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Vera Kolashnikova Soviet Union 6.37 OR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Elżbieta Krzesińska Poland 6.27  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Hildrun Claus Germany 6.21  
4 Renate Junker Germany 6.19  
5 Lyudmila Radchenko Soviet Union 6.16  
6 Helga Hoffmann Germany 6.11  
7 Joke Bijleveld Netherlands 6.11
8 Valentina Shaprunova Soviet Union 6.01
9 Mary Bignal Great Britain 6.01
10 Beverly Weigel New Zealand 5.98
11 Maria Piątkowska Poland 5.98
12 Fumiko Ito Japan 5.98
Claus was favoured after twice breaking the world record at the German Olympic trials. Mary Bignal (GBR) led the qualifiers with 6.33, but fouled twice in the final before producing a safe but short 6.01 for ninth place. After three rounds Claus (6.18) and reigning champion Krzesińska (6.17) were led by Krepkina, co-holder of the 100m world record, with 6.22. The compact (1.59/58Kg) Ukrainian cemented the gold medal with her fourth round jump of 6.37. Krzesińska jumped 6.25 and then 6.27 to win the silver. The winner was competing in her third Olympics – she was a member of the USSR 4x100 team which finished fourth in 1952-56-60. Her winning jump was the second best of all-time.
Tokyo, 14 Oct 1964
(Competitors: 31; Countries: 21; Finalists: 17)

Final

Place Athlete Nation Best mark
1 Mary Rand Great Britain 6.76 metres WR
2 Irena Kirszenstein Poland 6.60 metres
3 Tatyana Schelkanova Soviet Union 6.42 metres
4 Ingrid Becker Germany 6.40 metres
5 Viorica Viscopoleanu Romania 6.35 metres
6 Diana Jorgova Bulgaria 6.24 metres
7 Hildrun Laufer Germany 6.24 metres
8 Helga Hoffmann Germany 6.23 metres
9 Berit Berthelsen Norway 6.19 metres
10 Tatyana Talysheva Soviet Union 6.18 metres
11 Aida Chuiko Soviet Union 6.13 metres
12 Willye White United States 6.07 metres
Shchelkanova had the three best jumps in the world prior to Tokyo, but it was the number two jumper, Rand, who led the qualifying with an Olympic record 6.52. Rand (then Bignal) had led the Rome qualifiers, only to falter in the final. This time she made no mistake, leading from the outset with 6.59. Though threatened by the ubiquitous Kirszenstein’s 6.56 in round 3, Rand was untroubled. The “golden girl” of British athletics soared to a world record 6.76 in the fifth round despite a headwind of 1.69. A similar following wind would have resulted in a jump of around 7.00. As it was Rand dominated the competition, for her six jumps averaged 6.62, ahead of Kirszenstein’s best of 6.60, and well ahead of the demoralised Shchelkanova. The Russian was not as disappointing as the popular Willye White (USA), who had ranked third before Tokyo with 6.55/6.60w, but managed only 6.07 in the final.
Mexico City, 14 Oct 1968
(Competitors: 27; Countries: 19; Finalists: 14)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Viorica Viscopoleanu Romania 6.82 WR
2nd, silver medalist(s) Sheila Sherwood Great Britain 6.68  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Tatyana Talysheva Soviet Union 6.66  
4 Burghild Wieczorek East Germany 6.48  
5 Mirosława Sarna Poland 6.47  
6 Ingrid Becker West Germany 6.43  
7 Berit Berthelsen Norway 6.40  
8 Heide Rosendahl West Germany 6.40  
9 Violet Odogwu Nigeria 6.23  
10 Martha Watson United States 6.20  
11 Willye White United States 6.08  
12 Maureen Barton Great Britain 5.95  
13 Ann Wilson Great Britain 5.90  
14 Bärbel Löhnert East Germany 4.49  
The medals were settled with the first six jumps of the opening round, as Talysheva jumped 6.55, to be followed by Sherwood with 6.60 and Viscopoleanu’s world record of 6.82. In the absence of Szewińska, concentrating on the 200m, the Romanian had been one of the favourites, but her world record was nevertheless startling. Talysheva reacted well with a personal best 6.66 in the second round, to move into silver medal position, which was recovered by Sherwood in the fifth round, who leapfrogged Talysheva by two places on the world all-time list to fourth with her 6.68. Wieczorek won the battle for the next tier with 6.48, although Rosendahl had jumped 6.54 in the qualifying round. Just eight centimetres covered fourth to eighth places.
Munich, 31 Aug 1972
(Competitors: 33; Countries: 19; Finalists: 14)

Final

At the end of three jobs the top eight received another three jumps. The remaining were eliminated from medal contention.

Overall Athlete Nationality Mark
1st, gold medalist(s) Heide Rosendahl West Germany 6.78
2nd, silver medalist(s) Diana Yorgova Bulgaria 6.77
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Eva Šuranová Czechoslovakia 6.67
4 Marcia Garbey Cuba 6.52
5 Heidi Schüller West Germany 6.51
6 Meta Antenen Switzerland 6.49
7 Viorica Viscopoleanu Romania 6.48
8 Margrit Olfert East Germany 6.46
9 Sheila Sherwood Great Britain 6.41
10 Ilona Bruzsenyák Hungary 6.39
11 Willye White United States 6.27
12 Jarmila Nygrýnová Czechoslovakia 6.24
13 Angelika Liebsch East Germany 6.23
14 Elena Vintilă Romania 6.13
Yorgova (6.75) and Rosendahl (6.72) were the list leaders before the Games, with the German expected to win. Rosendahl jumped 6.62 in the qualifying round, but was led by Angelika Liebsch (GDR) who reached 6.69, though she managed just 6.23 for 13th later in the day. Rosendahl opened in the final with 6.78 (wind +0.5), while Yorgova reached only 6.43. The Bulgarian moved into second place with 6.62w in the third round, and moved to within 1cm of Rosendahl with her next jump of 6.77 into a slight headwind (-0.5) after briefly losing second to Šuranová’s 6.67. Rosendahl, the world record holder, was clearly the best on the day, with four jumps further than 6.70.
Montreal, 23 Jul 1976
(Competitors: 30; Countries: 19; Finalists: 12)

Final standings

Overall Athlete Nationality Mark
1st, gold medalist(s) Angela Voigt East Germany 6.72
2nd, silver medalist(s) Kathy McMillan United States 6.66
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Lidiya Alfeyeva Soviet Union 6.60
4 Siegrun Siegl East Germany 6.59
5 Ildikó Szabó-Erdélyi Hungary 6.57
6 Jarmila Nygrýnová Czechoslovakia 6.54
7 Heidemarie Wycisk East Germany 6.39
8 Elena Vintilă Romania 6.38
9 Sue Scott-Reeve Great Britain 6.27
10 Anikó Milassin Hungary 6.19
11 Diane Jones Canada 6.13
12 Liliyana Panayotova-Ivanova Bulgaria Did Not Start
Voigt (6.92) and Siegl (6.99) had each broken the world record during the season, but the competition produced the worst winning jump since 1960. Alfeyeva led the qualifiers with 6.54, then Voigt won the competition with her first jump of 6.72. Siegl, Nygrýnová and Szabó were the only other jumpers over 6.50 in the first half of the competition, with Alfeyeva (6.60 in the fourth) and McMillan (6.66 in the fifth) the athletes nearest to Voigt.
Moscow, 31 Jul 1980
(Competitors: 19; Countries: 11; Finalists: 13)

Final

RANK FINAL DISTANCE
Med 1.png  Tatyana Kolpakova (URS) 7.06 m
Med 2.png  Brigitte Wujak (GDR) 7.04 m
Med 3.png  Tatyana Skachko (URS) 7.01 m
4.  Anna Włodarczyk (POL) 6.95 m
5.  Siegrun Siegl (GDR) 6.87 m
6.  Jarmila Nygrýnová (TCH) 6.83 m
7.  Siegrid Heimann (GDR) 6.71 m
8.  Lidiya Alfeyeva (URS) 6.71 m
9.  Susan Hearnshaw (GBR) 6.50 m
10.  Sue Reeve (GBR) 6.46 m
11.  Barbara Baran-Wojnar (POL) 6.33 m
12.  Lidiya Gusheva (BUL) 6.24 m
13.  Jennifer Innis (GUY) 6.10 m
Alfeyeva again led the qualifying with 6.78, as the worst of the qualifiers reached 6.44. Skachko led the first round with an Olympic record 6.96, and Wujak and Kolpakova also beat the old Olympic record with 6.88 and 6.84. Skachko consolidated her first round effort with the first 7m jump in Olympic history – 7.01 – and only Włodarczyk (6.88) and Kolpakova (6.87) were able to improve before the last round. Włodarczyk improved again to 6.95 with her last jump to tighten her grasp on the silver medal, but two jumps later that hold began to slide, as the 20 year-old Kolpakova – a native of Frunze, the Kirghiz capital – gave it everything and boomed out to 7.06 to become the second furthest jumper ever. That wasn’t quite the end, as Wujak stretched out to a GDR record of 7.04. No-one had ever jumped 7m and lost before, and here Skachko moved to number four on the all-time list yet finished only third. Former world record holder Siegl rounded out the competition with her best of the day, 6.87, as four of the top five reached their best in the last round of this great competition.
Los Angeles, 9 Aug 1984
(Competitors: 23; Countries: 17; Finalists: 12)

Final

  • Held on August 9, 1984
Rank Athlete Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Anișoara Stanciu Romania 6.96  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Vali Ionescu Romania 6.81  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Sue Hearnshaw Great Britain 6.80  
4 Angela Thacker United States 6.78  
5 Jackie Joyner-Kersee United States 6.77  
6 Robyn Lorraway Australia 6.67  
7 Glynis Nunn Australia 6.53  
8 Shonel Ferguson Bahamas 6.44  
9 Carol Lewis United States 6.43  
10 Dorothy Scott Jamaica 6.40  
11 Linda Garden Australia 6.30  
12 Snežana Dančetović Yugoslavia 5.88  
Cuşmir and Ionescu had between them set the previous five world records, though World Champion Heike Daute (GDR) was generally recognised as the best jumper in the world. Of those present, Carol Lewis was regarded as the one most likely to dent the Romanian hegemony. However, it was Joyner who led the qualifying with 6.77, as six jumpers reached the standard of 6.50. Cuşmir and Hearnshaw, jumping consecutively, set the standard in the final. Both reached 6.80 in the first round, and the Romanian took sole control of the gold with her fourth jump of 6.96. Ionescu moved up from fifth with her penultimate jump of 6.81, and the medals were settled. Thacker won the battle of the Americans from Joyner 6.78w to 6.77, as Lewis had an off-day, reaching only 6.43.
Seoul, 29 Sep 1988
(Competitors: 30; Countries: 20; Finalists: 12)

Final

RANK ATHLETE DISTANCE
Med 1.png  Jackie Joyner-Kersee (USA) 7.40m
Med 2.png  Heike Drechsler (GDR) 7.22m
Med 3.png  Galina Chistyakova (URS) 7.11m
4.  Yelena Belevskaya (URS) 7.04m
5.  Nicole Boegman (AUS) 6.73m
6.  Fiona May (GBR) 6.62m
7.  Agata Karczmarek (POL) 6.60m
8.  Sabine John (GDR) 6.55m
9.  Qiying Xiong (CHN) 6.50m
10.  Inessa Kravets (URS) 6.46m
11.  Shuzhen Liu (CHN) 6.40m
12.  Lene Demsitz (DEN) 6.38m
This was expected to be a three-way battle between World Champion Joyner-Kersee, world record holder Chistyakova and European Champion Drechsler. The first skirmish was won by none of them, as Belevskaya led the qualifying round with 7.06. The silver medallist from the 1987 World Championships was in second place after two rounds of the final with 7.04, after Chistyakova led the first round with 7.11. The Ukrainian-born Russian showed great spring, but less speed than her rivals, and the superior quickness of Drechsler and Joyner- Kersee came into play the following round as the German reached 7.18 ahead of Joyner-Kersee’s 7.16. Drechsler built on her lead with 7.22 in the next round but was overtaken by Joyner-Kersee’s superb 7.40 in the penultimate round, the American using every centimetre of the board. Drechsler averaged almost 7.12 for her six-jump series, and Chistyakova jumped well despite having her takeoff leg buckle under her on her second jump.
Barcelona, 7 Aug 1992
(Competitors: 35; Countries: 23; Finalists: 12)

Final

RANK FINAL DISTANCE
Med 1.png  Heike Drechsler (GER) 7.14 m
Med 2.png  Inessa Kravets (EUN) 7.12 m
Med 3.png  Jackie Joyner-Kersee (USA) 7.07 m
4.  Mirela Dulgheru (ROM) 6.71 m
5.  Irina Mushailova (EUN) 6.68 m
6.  Sharon Couch (USA) 6.66 m
7.  Sheila Echols (USA) 6.62 m
8.  Susen Tiedtke (GER) 6.60 m
9.  Flora Hyacinth (ISV) 6.52 m
10.  Agata Karczmarek (POL) 6.41 m
11.  Renata Nielsen (DEN) 6.06 m
DSQ  Nijolė Medvedeva (LTU) 6.76 m (4th)
Drechsler led the qualifying with 7.08, the only 7m jump in the preliminary round, but Joyner-Kersee was the favourite, having beaten Drechsler in all three of their previous championship meetings. Kravets, 10th four years earlier, produced the first quality jump of the final, 7.12, in the first round. This was followed by JJK with 7.07 two jumps later. Neither would improve, but would only be approached by Drechsler. The German reached 6.99 in the second round, and improved to produce the gold medal jump of 7.14 in the fourth. Both Joyner-Kersee and Kravets both reached 7.00 again, but, as the American graciously put it, “this was Heike’s day.” Nijolė Medvedeva (LTU) was initially fourth with 6.76, but disqualified after failing a doping control test.
Atlanta, 2 Aug 1996
(Competitors: 46; Countries: 34; Finalists: 12)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Chioma Ajunwa Nigeria 7.12  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Fiona May Italy 7.02  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Jackie Joyner-Kersee United States 7.00  
4 Niki Xanthou Greece 6.97  
5 Iryna Chekhovtsova Ukraine 6.97  
6 Agata Karczmarek Poland 6.90  
7 Iva Prandzheva Bulgaria 6.82  
8 Nicole Boegman Australia 6.73  
 
9 Tunde Vaszi Hungary 6.60  
10 Chantal Brunner New Zealand 6.49  
11 Voula Patoulidou Greece 6.37  
  Sharon Jaklofsky Netherlands NM
Favourite Joyner-Kersee was suffering from a hamstring injury, and Drechsler had a thigh injury which prevented her from defending her title. World Champion May led the qualifying with 6.85, from Ajunwa (6.81). The Nigerian, who had just missed making the 100m final, used her speed effectively in the first round of the final, stretching out to 7.12. Ajunwa had been suspended for four years in 1992 for a doping violation and was banned from the Nigerian soccer team as well as international athletics. May reached a personal best 7.02 in the second round, but could get no closer. She was reported to say after the competition that drug bans should last forever. Just that fate befell Ajunwa from June 2002, when she failed another doping test. Drugs did directly affect the event, if not the medals, as Iva Prandzheva (BUL) – finishing seventh with 6.82 – was subsequently disqualified for failing a doping test. The bronze medal was a contest between Xánthou and Shekhovtsova, both of whom jumped 6.97, until the final round, when Joyner-Kersee, slowed by injury, managed a jump of 7.00 – about 7.10 from toe to heel – to take third place and the last of her six Olympic medals.
Sydney, 29 Sep 2000
(Competitors: 39; Countries: 25; Finalists: 12)

Final

Rank Athlete Nation Mark Record
1st, gold medalist(s) Heike Drechsler Germany 6.99 SB
2nd, silver medalist(s) Fiona May Italy 6.92  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Tatyana Kotova Russia 6.83  
4 Olga Rublyova Russia 6.79  
5 Susen Tiedtke Germany 6.74  
6 Jackie Edwards Bahamas 6.59  
7 Tünde Vaszi Hungary 6.59  
8 Lyudmila Galkina Russia 6.56  
9 Elva Goulbourne Jamaica 6.43  
10 Dawn Burrell United States 6.38  
11 Olena Shekhovtsova Ukraine 6.37  
DSQ Marion Jones United States 6.92
The focus was on Marion Jones and her “drive for five” Olympic gold medals, though of course her efforts have since been completely discredited due to long-term doping violations (see page 208). She had already “won” the 100m and 200m as the long jump final began. Drechsler (6.84) led the qualifiers, ahead of co-favourite May (6.81) and Jones (6.78). May led the final with her first two efforts of 6.76 and 6.82, but was overtaken by ’92 champion Drechsler, who sailed out to 6.99 in the third round. She was followed immediately by Jones, who reached 6.92 with her typically low trajectory. Kotova, the other favourite, had a poor competition, reaching her best in round 3 with 6.83. None of the top eight positions changed after round 3, with Jones fouling all three of her jumps, and May again taking the silver. Drechsler equalled Joyner-Kersee’s event record of three Olympic medals in the event. In December 2007 the IOC confirmed Jones’s disqualification, and two years later approved the upgrading for Kotova to bronze.
Athens, 27 Aug 2004
(Competitors: 39; Countries: 30; Finalists: 12)

Final

Rank Name Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Tatyana Lebedeva Russia 7.07  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Irina Simagina Russia 7.05  
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Tatyana Kotova Russia 7.05 SB
4 Bronwyn Thompson Australia 6.96 SB
5 Anju Bobby George India 6.83 NR
6 Jade Johnson Great Britain 6.80 PB
7 Tünde Vaszi Hungary 6.73 SB
8 Bianca Kappler Germany 6.66  
9 Grace Upshaw United States 6.64  
10 Carolina Klüft Sweden 6.63  
11 Yelena Kashcheyeva Kazakhstan 6.53  
  Marion Jones United States 6.85 DSQ
Ten of the 12 qualifiers reached the automatic qualifying level of 6.65, headed by Lebedeva’s 6.95. Simagina and Kotova leapt out to 7.05 on successive first round jumps. Lebedeva’s second effort was the goldwinning 7.07, and when Simagina cleared 7.02, after Johnson’s pb of 6.80, the three medals were settled. Only Lebedeva was able to reach seven metres again (7.05 in round 5), and the nearest threat came from Thompson’s fourth jump of 6.96. Behind her, Marion Jones’s 6.85w just edged George’s Indian record of 6.83 for fifth place (or so it was thought). The clean sweep was the first the event had seen, and the first in any women’s event since 1980. Vaszi originally placed eighth for the third Games in succession, but because of the 2007 disqualification of Jones from Sydney and Athens, the latter two placings were, eventually, upgraded to seventh.
Beijing, 23 Aug 2008
 

Final

22 August 2008 - 19:20[3]

Rank Name Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Maurren Higa Maggi Brazil 7.04 SB
2nd, silver medalist(s) Tatyana Lebedeva Russia 7.03 SB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Blessing Okagbare Nigeria 6.91 PB
4 Chelsea Hammond Jamaica 6.79 PB
5 Brittney Reese United States 6.76  
6 Oksana Udmurtova Russia 6.70  
7 Jade Johnson Great Britain 6.64  
8 Grace Upshaw United States 6.58  
 
9 Carolina Klüft Sweden 6.49  
10 Tabia Charles Canada 6.47  
11 Keila Costa Brazil 6.43  
12 Funmi Jimoh United States 6.29
The big shock in the qualifying round was the elimination of world leader Naide Gomes. The Portuguese had leapt 7.12 in 2008 and in Beijing had two fouls in the range of 7m before managing only 6.29. The top three positions in the final were settled by the end of the first round, but this was not a competition with an obvious conclusion. To begin with, it had commenced with a substitution. Ukrainian Lyudmila Blonska qualified with 6.76, but failed a doping control test after apparently winning silver in the heptathlon. As a result, Okagbare was advanced to the final in place of Blonska, and rarely has an athlete made so much of a second chance. Lebedeva (6.97) and Maggi (a seasonal best of 7.04) had already determined the top medals when Okagbare took her first round jump, a lifetime best of 6.91 to ensure the bronze medal. Hammond, fourth placer with 6.79, also achieved her best in the first round. All the jumpers, save one, had jumped their furthest by the end of the second round. Lebedeva, defending her title, soared to her best jump of the year – 7.03, to fail by the smallest possible margin. Maggi’s jump had been perfect on the board, while Lebedeva had left 5.5cm to spare on her 7.03. The Russian accepted defeat graciously, but some other jumpers were less than thrilled by Maggi’s win, the Brazilian having served a two-year doping ban to 2005.
London, 8 Aug 2012
(Competitors: 30; Countries: 23; Finalists: 12)

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality Result Notes
1st, gold medalist(s) Brittney Reese United States 7.12  
2nd, silver medalist(s) Yelena Sokolova Russia 7.07 PB
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Janay DeLoach United States 6.89  
4 Ineta Radēviča Latvia 6.88 SB
5 Anna Nazarova Russia 6.77  
6 Lyudmila Kolchanova Russia 6.76  
7 Nastassia Mironchyk-Ivanova Belarus 6.72  
8 Éloyse Lesueur France 6.67  
9 Shara Proctor Great Britain 6.55  
10 Veronika Shutkova Belarus 6.54  
11 Ivana Španović Serbia 6.35  
N/A Karin Mey Melis Turkey DNS
Reese, who had won all four global titles in 2009-12, was the clear favourite. Yet she barely qualified with a series of x, x, 6.57. Britain’s Proctor won that stage of the contest with 6.83. The tables were turned in the final when Proctor failed to make the top eight, while Reese produced the gold medal-winning jump with her second round effort of
7.12 (7.14 from take-off). The American managed only one other fair jump, while Sokolova, her principal opponent, averaged 6.87 for her six efforts. Her best mark of 7.07 also came in the second round, when she took off with no spare distance at the board edge. Alaskan-born and bred DeLoach moved ahead of opening round leader Radevièa with her
penultimate jump of 6.89. Reese’s win was only the second by an
American in the history of the event.
Rio de Janeiro, 17 Aug 2016
(Competitors: 38; Countries: 26; Finalists: 12)

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality Result Notes
1st place, gold medalist(s) Tianna Bartoletta  United States 7.17 PB
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Brittney Reese  United States 7.15  
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Ivana Španović  Serbia 7.08 NR
4 Malaika Mihambo  Germany 6.95 PB
5 Ese Brume  Nigeria 6.81  
6 Ksenija Balta  Estonia 6.79 SB
7 Brooke Stratton  Australia 6.74  
8 Jazmin Sawyers  Great Britain 6.69  
9 Darya Klishina  Russia 6.63  
10 Sosthene Moguenara  Germany 6.61  
11 Lorraine Ugen  Great Britain 6.58  
Maryna Bekh  Ukraine NM  
 
  
Long Jump
5.64 [18-6] Q     Yvonne Curtet-Chabot   FRA London 1948
5,695 [18-8¼] 1     Olga Gyarmati   HUN London 1948
5,73 [18-9¾] Q     Shirley Cawley   GBR Helsinki 1952
5,77 [18-11¼] Q     Aleksandra Chudina   URS Helsinki 1952
5,77 [18-11¼] Q     Nina Tyurkina   URS Helsinki 1952
5,88 [19-3½] Q     Mabel Landry   USA Helsinki 1952
6,16 [20-2½] Q     Yvette Williams   NZL Helsinki 1952
6,24 [20-5¾] 1     Yvette Williams (4) attempt NZL Helsinki 1952
6,35 [20-10] 1 <2.0 =WR Elżbieta Krzesińska (2) attempt POL Melbourne 1956
6,37 [20-10¾] 1     Vera Krepkina (4) attempt URS Rome 1960
[6.44w] {21-1½} Q +2.3   Helga Hoffmann (1) attempt FRG Tokyo 1964
6,37 [20-10¾] Q +1.9   Ingrid Becker (1) attempt FRG Tokyo 1964
6,52 [21-4¾] Q +0.9   Mary Rand (1) attempt GBR Tokyo 1964
6.59! [21-7½] - +1.4   Mary Rand (1) attempt GBR Tokyo 1964
6.63! [21-9] - +1.2   Mary Rand (4) attempt GBR Tokyo 1964
6,76 [22-2¼] 1 -1,7 WR Mary Rand (5) attempt GBR Tokyo 1964
6.82A* [22-4½] 1 0 WR Viorica Viscopoleanu (1) attempt ROU Mexico City 1968
6,78 [22-3] 1 +0.6   Heide Rosendahl-Ecker (1) attempt FRG Munich 1972
[6.83w] {22-5} Pen +2.7   Heide Rosendahl-Ecker (1) attempt FRG Munich 1972
6,79 [22-3½] Pen -0,6   Olga Rukavishnikova (3) attempt URS Moscow 1980
6.96! [22-10] - +1.6   Tatyana Skachko (1) attempt URS Moscow 1980
7,01 [23-0] 3 -0,4   Tatyana Skachko (3) attempt URS Moscow 1980
7,06 [23-2] 1 +0.4   Tatyana Kolpakova (6) attempt URS Moscow 1980
7,27 [23-10¼] Pen +0.7   Jackie Joyner-Kersee (1) attempt USA Seoul 1988
7.40 [24-3½] 1 +0.9   Jackie Joyner-Kersee (5) attempt USA Seoul 1988
*Viscopoleanu’s mark is the only mark that would be dropped from a list with no altitude-assisted marks.

Long Jump (Women's) 200 All time Best Perfomances

  
Jackie_Joyner-Kersee2.jpg  
 
  Long jump                  
1 7.40 0.9 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 1 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
2 7.22 0.5 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 East Germany GDR 2 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
3 7.17 0.6 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985   USA 1 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
4 7.15 0.6 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986   USA 2 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
5 7.14   Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 Germany GER 1 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
6 7.12   Inessa Kravets 5 Oct 1966 Ukraine UKR 2 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
7 7.12 0.9 Chioma Ajunwa 25 Dec 1970 Nigeria NGR 1 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
8 7.12 0.8 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986 United States USA 1 Final London 8 August 2012
9 7.11 1.3 Galina Cistjaková 26 Jul 1962 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
10 7.08   Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 Germany GER 1 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
11 7.08 0.6 Ivana Španović 10 May 1990   SRB 3 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
12 7.07   Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 3 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
13 7.07 1.3 Tatyana Lebedeva 21 Jul 1976 Russia RUS 1 Final Athens 27 August 2004
14 7.07 0.5 Yelena Sokolova 23 Jul 1986 Russia RUS 2 Final London 8 August 2012
15 7.06   Tatyana Kolpakova 18 Oct 1959 Soviet Union URS 1 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
16 7.06 -0.5 Yelena Belevskaya 11 Oct 1963 Soviet Union URS 1 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
17 7.05 1.8 Tatyana Kotova 11 Dec 1976 Russia RUS 3 Final Athens 27 August 2004
18 7.05 0.8 Irina Meleshina 25 May 1982 Russia RUS 2 Final Athens 27 August 2004
19 7.04   Brigitte Wujak 6 Mar 1955 East Germany GDR 2 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
20 7.04 0.0 Yelena Belevskaya 11 Oct 1963 Soviet Union URS 4 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
21 7.04 0.2 Maurren Higa Maggi 25 Jun 1976 Brazil BRA 1 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
22 7.03 0.4 Tatyana Lebedeva 21 Jul 1976 Russia RUS 2 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
23 7.02 1.4 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Italy ITA 2 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
24 7.01   Tatyana Skachko 18 Aug 1954 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
25 7.00 0.5 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 3 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
26 6.99 1.9 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 Germany GER 1 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
27 6.97 -0.1 Galina Cistjaková 26 Jul 1962 Soviet Union URS 2 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
28 6.97 1.4 Níki Xánthou 11 Oct 1973 Greece GRE 4 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
29 6.97 0.9 Olena Bobrovnyk 31 May 1972 Ukraine UKR 5 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
30 6.96 0.5 Anisoara Cusmir 28 Jun 1962 Romania ROU 1 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
31 6.96 0.2 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 3 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
32 6.96 0.8 Bronwyn Thompson 29 Jan 1978 Australia AUS 4 Final Athens 27 August 2004
33 6.95   Anna Włodarczyk 24 Mar 1951 Poland POL 4 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
34 6.95 0.3 Tatyana Lebedeva 21 Jul 1976 Russia RUS 1 Qualifying Round Group B Athens 25 August 2004
35 6.95 0.6 Malaika Mihambo 3 Feb 1994   GER 4 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
36 6.92 1.1 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Italy ITA 2 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
37 6.91 0.1 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988 Nigeria NGR 3 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
38 6.90 0.8 Agata Karczmarek 29 Nov 1963 Poland POL 6 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
39 6.89 0.2 Janay DeLoach 12 Oct 1985 United States USA 3 Final London 8 August 2012
40 6.88 1.2 Ineta Radēviča 13 Jul 1981 Latvia LAT 4 Final London 8 August 2012
41 6.87   Sigrun Siegl 29 Oct 1954 East Germany GDR 5 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
42 6.87 1.1 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986 United States USA 1 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
43 6.87 -0.3 Ivana Španović 10 May 1990   SRB 1 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
44 6.86   Irina Mushailova 6 Jan 1967 Russia RUS 2 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
45 6.85 -0.5 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Italy ITA 1 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
46 6.84 0.3 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 Germany GER 1 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
47 6.83   Jarmila Nygrynová 15 Feb 1953 Czechoslovakia TCH 6 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
48 6.83   Mirela Renda 5 Oct 1966 Romania ROU 3 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
49 6.83 1.3 Tatyana Kotova 11 Dec 1976 Russia RUS 3 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
50 6.83 1.2 Anju B. George 19 Apr 1977 India IND 5 Final Athens 27 August 2004
51 6.83 -0.3 Shara Proctor 16 Sep 1988 Great Britain GBR 1 Qualification London 7 August 2012
52 6.82   Viorica Viscopoleanu   1939 Romania ROU 1 Final Mexico 14 October 1968
53 6.82 -0.7 Malaika Mihambo 3 Feb 1994   GER 2 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
54 6.81 -1.1 Valy Ionescu 31 Aug 1960 Romania ROU 2 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
55 6.81 1.0 Sabine John 16 Oct 1957 East Germany GDR 4 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
56 6.81 0.3 Chioma Ajunwa 25 Dec 1970 Nigeria NGR 2 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
57 6.81 0.5 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Italy ITA 2 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
58 6.81 -1.8 Janay DeLoach 12 Oct 1985 United States USA 2 Qualification London 7 August 2012
59 6.81 0.5 Ese Brume 20 Jan 1996   NGR 5 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
60 6.80 1.2 Jade Johnson 7 Jun 1980 Great Britain GBR 6 Final Athens 27 August 2004
61 6.80 0.4 Bronwyn Thompson 29 Jan 1978 Australia AUS 2 Qualifying Round Group B Athens 25 August 2004
62 6.79   Inessa Kravets 5 Oct 1966 Ukraine UKR 4 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
63 6.79 1.4 Olga Rublyova 28 Oct 1974 Russia RUS 4 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
64 6.79 -0.1 Tatyana Kotova 11 Dec 1976 Russia RUS 3 Qualifying Round Group B Athens 25 August 2004
65 6.79 0.3 Maurren Higa Maggi 25 Jun 1976 Brazil BRA 2 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
66 6.79 0.2 Chelsea Hammond 2 Aug 1983 Jamaica JAM 4 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
67 6.79 -0.2 Ksenija Balta 1 Nov 1986   EST 6 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
68 6.78   Heide Rosendahl 14 Feb 1947 West Germany FRG 1 Final Munich 31 August 1972
69 6.78   Lidiya Alfeyeva 17 Jan 1946 Soviet Union URS 1 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
70 6.78 -0.1 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986   USA 3 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
71 6.77   Diana Yorgova 9 Dec 1942 Bulgaria BUL 2 Final Munich 31 August 1972
72 6.77 -1.1 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 5 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
73 6.77 0.2 Dawn Campbell 1 Nov 1973 United States USA 3 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
74 6.77 0.5 Anna Klyashtornaya 3 Feb 1986 Russia RUS 5 Final London 8 August 2012
75 6.76   Mary Bignal-Rand   1940 Great Britain GBR 1 Final Tokyo 14 October 1964
76 6.76 0.7 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 1 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
77 6.76 0.4 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986 United States USA 5 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
78 6.76 0.0 Lyudmila Kolchanova 1 Oct 1979 Russia RUS 6 Final London 8 August 2012
79 6.75   Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 5 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
80 6.75 0.8 Sharon Jaklofsky 30 Sep 1968 Netherlands NED 3 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
81 6.75 -0.7 Irina Meleshina 25 May 1982 Russia RUS 1 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
82 6.74   Susen Tiedtke 23 Jan 1969 Germany GER 6 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
83 6.74 0.1 Susen Tiedtke 23 Jan 1969 Germany GER 5 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
84 6.74 0.7 Brooke Stratton 12 Jul 1993   AUS 7 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
85 6.73 1.3 Nicole Boegman 5 Mar 1967 Australia AUS 7 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
86 6.73 1.0 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 4 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
87 6.73 0.0 Carolina Klüft 2 Feb 1983 Sweden SWE 4 Qualifying Round Group B Athens 25 August 2004
88 6.72   Angela Voigt 18 May 1951 East Germany GDR 1 Final Montreal 23 July 1976
89 6.72 0.4 Nicole Boegman 5 Mar 1967 Australia AUS 7 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
90 6.72 0.0 Inessa Kravets 5 Oct 1966 Soviet Union URS 5 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
91 6.72 0.0 Heike Drechsler 16 Dec 1964 East Germany GDR 6 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
92 6.72 0.0 Nastassia Mironchyk-Ivanova 13 Apr 1989 Belarus BLR 7 Final London 8 August 2012
93 6.71   Sigrid Ulbricht 25 Jul 1958 East Germany GDR 2 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
94 6.71   Sigrid Ulbricht 25 Jul 1958 East Germany GDR 7 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
95 6.71   Lidiya Alfeyeva 17 Jan 1946 Soviet Union URS 8 Final Moscow 31 July 1980
96 6.71   Mirela Renda 5 Oct 1966 Romania ROU 4 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
97 6.71   Flora Hyacinth 10 Mar 1966 United States Virgin Islands ISV 7 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
98 6.71 0.2 Jade Johnson 7 Jun 1980 Great Britain GBR 2 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
99 6.71 -0.3 Yelena Sokolova 23 Jul 1986 Russia RUS 3 Qualification London 7 August 2012
100 6.71 0.0 Ksenija Balta 1 Nov 1986   EST 4 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
101 6.70   Tatyana Kolpakova 18 Oct 1959 Soviet Union URS 3 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
102 6.70 1.3 Jackie Joyner-Kersee 3 Mar 1962 United States USA 5 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
103 6.70 0.4 Agata Karczmarek 29 Nov 1963 Poland POL 5 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
104 6.70 0.0 Olena Bobrovnyk 31 May 1972 Ukraine UKR 7 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
105 6.70 0.1 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 4 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
106 6.70 1.4 Tatyana Lebedeva 21 Jul 1976 Russia RUS 4 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
107 6.70 1.0 Carolina Klüft 2 Feb 1983 Sweden SWE 3 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
108 6.70 0.6 Oksana Udmurtova 1 Feb 1982 Russia RUS 6 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
109 6.70 -0.1 Tianna Bartoletta 30 Aug 1985   USA 5 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
110 6.69   Angelika Liebsch 19 Apr 1950 East Germany GDR 1 Qualification Munich 31 August 1972
111 6.69 0.9 Anisoara Cusmir 28 Jun 1962 Romania ROU 2 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
112 6.69 -0.2 Bianca Kappler 8 Aug 1977 Germany GER 3 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
113 6.69 -0.2 Anju B. George 19 Apr 1977 India IND 4 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
114 6.69 0.5 Jazmin Sawyers 21 May 1994   GBR 8 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
115 6.68   Sheila Parkin-Sherwood   1946 Great Britain GBR 2 Final Mexico 14 October 1968
116 6.68   Irina Mushailova 6 Jan 1967 Russia RUS 5 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
117 6.68 0.7 Elva Goulbourne 21 Jan 1980 Jamaica JAM 5 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
118 6.68 0.0 Grace Upshaw 25 Sep 1975 United States USA 5 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
119 6.68 0.6 Grace Upshaw 25 Sep 1975 United States USA 5 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
120 6.68 -0.4 Ineta Radēviča 13 Jul 1981 Latvia LAT 4 Qualification London 7 August 2012
121 6.67   Eva Suranová 24 Apr 1946 Czechoslovakia TCH 3 Final Munich 31 August 1972
122 6.67 1.9 Robyn Lorraway 20 Jul 1961 Australia AUS 6 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
123 6.67 1.1 Agata Karczmarek 29 Nov 1963 Poland POL 8 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
124 6.67 0.8 Nicole Boegman 5 Mar 1967 Australia AUS 8 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
125 6.67 -0.2 Éloyse Lesueur 15 Jul 1988 France FRA 8 Final London 8 August 2012
126 6.67 -0.1 Ese Brume 20 Jan 1996   NGR 6 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
127 6.66   Tatyana Talysheva   1938 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Mexico 14 October 1968
128 6.66   Kathy McMillan 7 Nov 1957 United States USA 2 Final Montreal 23 July 1976
129 6.66   Sue Hearnshaw 26 May 1961 Great Britain GBR 4 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
130 6.66 -0.9 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Great Britain GBR 9 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
131 6.66   Sharon Couch 13 Sep 1967 United States USA 6 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
132 6.66 0.0 Tatyana Kotova 11 Dec 1976 Russia RUS 6 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
133 6.66 0.3 Bianca Kappler 8 Aug 1977 Germany GER 8 Final Athens 27 August 2004
134 6.66 -0.8 Nastassia Mironchyk-Ivanova 13 Apr 1989 Belarus BLR 5 Qualification London 7 August 2012
135 6.65   Brigitte Wujak 6 Mar 1955 East Germany GDR 5 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
136 6.65 1.2 Olena Bobrovnyk 31 May 1972 Ukraine UKR 8 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
137 6.65 1.1 Susen Tiedtke 23 Jan 1969 Germany GER 9 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
138 6.65 0.2 Olga Rublyova 28 Oct 1974 Russia RUS 7 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
139 6.65 -0.3 Lorraine Ugen 22 Aug 1991   GBR 7 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
140 6.64 0.9 Sue Hearnshaw 26 May 1961 Great Britain GBR 3 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
141 6.64   Sharon Couch 13 Sep 1967 United States USA 8 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
142 6.64 0.7 Grace Upshaw 25 Sep 1975 United States USA 9 Final Athens 27 August 2004
143 6.64 0.7 Jade Johnson 7 Jun 1980 Great Britain GBR 7 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
144 6.64 -1.0 Darya Klishina 15 Jan 1991   RUS 8 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
145 6.63   Renata Nielsen 18 May 1966 Denmark DEN 9 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
146 6.63 1.5 Carolina Klüft 2 Feb 1983 Sweden SWE 10 Final Athens 27 August 2004
147 6.63 0.5 Oksana Udmurtova 1 Feb 1982 Russia RUS 6 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
148 6.63 0.0 Darya Klishina 15 Jan 1991   RUS 9 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
149 6.62   Heide Rosendahl 14 Feb 1947 West Germany FRG 2 Qualification Munich 31 August 1972
150 6.62 -0.7 Fiona May 12 Dec 1969 Great Britain GBR 6 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
151 6.62   Sheila Echols 2 Oct 1964 United States USA 7 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
152 6.62 0.3 Chantal Brunner 5 Nov 1970 New Zealand NZL 9 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
153 6.62 -0.3 Lyudmila Galkina 20 Jan 1972 Russia RUS 10 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
154 6.62 0.7 Keila Costa 6 Feb 1983 Brazil BRA 7 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
155 6.62 -1.3 Anna Klyashtornaya 3 Feb 1986 Russia RUS 6 Qualification London 7 August 2012
156 6.61 -1.2 Robyn Lorraway 20 Jul 1961 Australia AUS 4 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
157 6.61 0.6 Xiong Qiying 14 Oct 1967 China CHN 10 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
158 6.61 0.8 Funmi Jimoh 29 May 1984 United States USA 9 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
159 6.61 0.7 Jade Johnson 7 Jun 1980 Great Britain GBR 10 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
160 6.61 0.6 Tabia Charles 6 Apr 1985 Canada CAN 8 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
161 6.61 0.0 Sosthene Taroum Moguenara 17 Oct 1989   GER 10 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
162 6.60   Irena Szewińska-Kirszenstein   1946 Poland POL 2 Final Tokyo 14 October 1964
163 6.60   Lidiya Alfeyeva 17 Jan 1946 Soviet Union URS 3 Final Montreal 23 July 1976
164 6.60 0.5 Valy Ionescu 31 Aug 1960 Romania ROU 5 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
165 6.60 -0.9 Agata Karczmarek 29 Nov 1963 Poland POL 7 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
166 6.60   Susen Tiedtke 23 Jan 1969 Germany GER 8 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
167 6.60 1.3 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 8 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
168 6.60 1.0 Níki Xánthou 11 Oct 1973 Greece GRE 10 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
169 6.60 0.4 Jackie Edwards 14 Apr 1971 Bahamas BAH 11 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
170 6.60 0.4 Chelsea Hammond 2 Aug 1983 Jamaica JAM 11 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
171 6.59   Sigrun Siegl 29 Oct 1954 East Germany GDR 4 Final Montreal 23 July 1976
172 6.59 0.5 Lene Demsitz 8 Mar 1959 Denmark DEN 11 Qualification Seoul 28 September 1988
173 6.59 0.9 Jackie Edwards 14 Apr 1971 Bahamas BAH 6 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
174 6.59 0.4 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 7 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
175 6.59 0.1 Jo Wise 15 Mar 1971 Great Britain GBR 12 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
176 6.59 0.4 Blessing Okagbare 9 Oct 1988 Nigeria NGR 12 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
177 6.58   Anna Włodarczyk 24 Mar 1951 Poland POL 6 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
178 6.58   Jarmila Nygrynová 15 Feb 1953 Czechoslovakia TCH 6 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
179 6.58 1.7 Flora Hyacinth 10 Mar 1966 United States Virgin Islands ISV 12 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
180 6.58 1.0 Paraskeví Patoulídou 23 Apr 1965 Greece GRE 11 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
181 6.58 0.4 Grace Upshaw 25 Sep 1975 United States USA 8 Final Beijing 22 August 2008
182 6.58 -0.1 Lorraine Ugen 22 Aug 1991   GBR 11 Final Rio de Janeiro 17 August 2016
183 6.57   Ildikó Szabó 19 Jul 1955 Hungary HUN 5 Final Montreal 23 July 1976
184 6.57 1.0 Yelena Kashcheyeva 17 Feb 1973 Kazakhstan KAZ 13 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
185 6.57 -0.1 Yelena Kashcheyeva 17 Feb 1973 Kazakhstan KAZ 6 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
186 6.57 1.2 Tatyana Kotova 11 Dec 1976 Russia RUS 13 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
187 6.57 0.4 Hrisopiyí Devetzí 2 Jan 1976 Greece GRE 14 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
188 6.57 -1.0 Lyudmila Kolchanova 1 Oct 1979 Russia RUS 7 Qualification London 7 August 2012
189 6.57 -1.3 Brittney Reese 9 Sep 1986 United States USA 8 Qualification London 7 August 2012
190 6.56   Tatyana Skachko 18 Aug 1954 Soviet Union URS 8 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
191 6.56   Lidia Guseva 11 Feb 1952 Bulgaria BUL 9 Qualification Moscow 30 July 1980
192 6.56 -0.8 Lissette Cuza 26 Feb 1975 Cuba CUB 13 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
193 6.56 0.6 Viktoriya Vershinina 11 Jun 1971 Ukraine UKR 14 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
194 6.56 0.2 Brooke Stratton 12 Jul 1993   AUS 9 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
195 6.55 -0.4 Carol Lewis 8 Aug 1963 United States USA 6 Qualification Los Angeles 8 August 1984
196 6.55 -0.9 Sabine John 16 Oct 1957 East Germany GDR 8 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
197 6.55   Sheila Echols 2 Oct 1964 United States USA 10 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
198 6.55   Agata Karczmarek 29 Nov 1963 Poland POL 11 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
199 6.55 0.6 Jackie Edwards 14 Apr 1971 Bahamas BAH 14 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
200 6.55 -0.8 Bronwyn Thompson 29 Jan 1978 Australia AUS 15 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
201 6.55 0.5 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 7 Qualifying Round Group A Athens 25 August 2004
202 6.55 0.2 Shara Proctor 16 Sep 1988 Great Britain GBR 9 Final London 8 August 2012
203 6.55 0.1 Sosthene Taroum Moguenara 17 Oct 1989   GER 11 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
204 6.55 -0.5 Maryna Bekh 18 Jul 1995   UKR 10 Qualification Rio de Janeiro 16 August 2016
      Long jump(w)                  
1 6.80 2.4 Sue Hearnshaw 26 May 1961 Great Britain GBR 3 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
2 6,78 2.2 Angela Thacker 27 Jun 1964 United States USA 4 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
3 6,73 2.4 Tünde Vaszi 18 Apr 1972 Hungary HUN 7 Final Athens 27 August 2004
4 6,73 2.3 Nicole Boegman 5 Mar 1967 Australia AUS 5 Final Seoul 29 September 1988
5 6,56 2.9 Lyudmila Galkina 20 Jan 1972 Russia RUS 8 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
6 6,53 2.1 Glynis Nunn 4 Dec 1960 Australia AUS 7 Final Los Angeles 9 August 1984
 
  Pefomances annulled cause of doping
  6.92   Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 3 Final Sydney 29 September 2000
  6.85   Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 5 Final Athens 27 August 2004
  6.82   Iva Prandzheva 15 Feb 1972 Bulgaria BUL 7 Final Atlanta 2 August 1996
  6.80   Karin Melis Mey 31 May 1983 Turkey TUR 2 Qualification London 7 August 2012
  6.78   Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 2 Qualification Sydney 27 September 2000
  6.76   Nijol Medvedeva 20 Oct 1960 Lithuania LTU 4 Final Barcelona 7 August 1992
  6.76   Lyudmila Blonska 9 Nov 1977 Ukraine UKR 3 Qualification Beijing 19 August 2008
  6.71   Nijol Medvedeva 20 Oct 1960 Lithuania LTU 5 Qualification Barcelona 6 August 1992
  6.70   Marion Jones 12 Oct 1975 United States USA 3 Qualification Athens 25 August 2004
  6.62   Iva Prandzheva 15 Feb 1972 Bulgaria BUL 1 Qualification Atlanta 1 August 1996
  6700   Lyudmila Blonska 9 Nov 1977 Ukraine UKR 2 Final Beijing 16 August 2008

 

Real time web analytics, Heat map tracking

Athletics in Olympic Games 2

Full

Results

 

Olympic Games

Full

Results

All Events

 

You are here: Home Athletics Olympic Games (Athletics) 3. Olympic Games (Athletics) - Events Olympic Events in Athletics - Long Jump (Women's)