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2004 Olympic Games Athens - Men's 110 m hurdles

 

 

Host City: Athina, Greece Format: Top four in each heat advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 24, 2004 Format: Top three in each heat and next four fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 27, 2004 Format: Top four in each heat and next eight fastest advanced to the quarter-finals.
(Competitors: 47; Countries: 34; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Olympic Stadium, Athens Olympic Sports Complex Spiros Loues, Maroussi
Overview by IAAF    2004-athens-stadium.jpg
Conditions were perfect for the heats, with temperatures of 27° and with largely favourable following winds. Doucouré opened proceedings by setting a French record of 13.18. Reigning champion García was next quickest with 13.24. Doucouré (13.23) was again fastest in the first heat of the next round, but the big shock came in the second race, won by Olijar (13.26) ahead of Garcia (13.28), but which saw the demise of Allen Johnson. The favourite to regain the title won in 1996 hit three hurdles hard, finally falling at the ninth. In more than a decade of international hurdling Johnson had only once previously fallen. Wignall won the first semi-final ahead of Liu, 13.17 to 13.18, with Duane Ross (USA) eliminated despite running 13.30. Doucouré again improved in the other race with a magnificent 13.06, ahead of Trammell’s 13.17. Liu and Trammell led at the first hurdle in the final, with Doucouré lagging after a very slow reaction to the gun. Liu escaped from Trammell at the fourth hurdle, when the Chinese athlete’s cleaner hurdle clearances began to tell. García closed in on the American, and Doucouré’s quickness came to the fore, as he moved into second place by the eighth. The Frenchman hit the ninth, skewed the 10th and slipped to last place after losing his balance. Liu flowed onwards oblivious to the events behind him, and reached the line in the photo-cell time of 12.94, a time which was unusually amended to a world record equaling 12.91. Trammell won the battle for silver, and García edged Wignall and Olijar for bronze.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
The last two World Championships (2001/03), and four of the last five, had been won by the 1996 gold medalist Allen Johnson (USA). At the 2003 Worlds he had defeated fellow American Terrence Trammell (silver) and China’s Liu Xiang (bronze). But based on results early in 2004, Liu was the favorite in Athina. Johnson made the US team but kept hitting barriers in the quarter-finals and fell at the ninth hurdle, not qualifying. Liu and Trammell easily made it to the final, as did defending gold medalist Anier García (CUB). They were joined by French hurdler Ladji Doucouré who won the second semi-final in 13.06. In the final Liu and Trammell led through four hurdles when Liu pulled ahead. Doucouré then pulled up to Trammell and led him slightly at the ninth hurdles, when he the barrier and then clobbered the tenth, eventually finishing last. Liu won by almost three metres over Trammell, with García third, in a time of 12.91, equalling the world record.
 

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World record  Colin Jackson (GBR) 12.91 s Stuttgart, Germany 20 August 1993
Olympic record  Allen Johnson (USA) 12.95 s Atlanta, United States 29 July 1996

The following records were established during the competition:

Date Event Name Nationality Result Record
27 August Final Liu Xiang China 12.91 =WR

Qualification

The qualification period for Athletics was 1 January 2003 to 9 August 2004. For the men's 110 metres hurdles, each National Olympic Committee was permitted to enter up to three athletes that had run the race in 13.55 seconds or faster during the qualification period. If an NOC had no athletes that qualified under that standard, one athlete that had run the race in 13.72 seconds or faster could be entered.
 
        Results        

The men's 110 metre hurdles at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 27.

The top four runners in each of the initial six heats automatically qualified for the second round. The next eight fastest runners from across the heats also qualified. Those 32 runners competed in 4 heats in the second round, with the top three runners from each heat and the four next fastest runners qualifying for the semifinals. There were two semifinal heats, and only the top four from each heat advanced to the final.

Ladji Doucouré was the leader in all of the preliminary rounds, but in the final, Liu Xiang led from the gun, running a flawless race to take the Olympic record and match Colin Jackson's world record with an identical 12.91. Behind him, returning silver medalist Terrence Trammell had a slight lead despite touching virtually every hurdle. As the attrition from dragging each weighted barrier slowed him more and more, Staņislavs Olijars appeared to edge ahead. But when Olijars hit the sixth hurdle he slowed out of contention. Coming back from an abysmal start, Doucouré became the next to edge ahead, looking like a lock for silver until he demolished the final hurdle, leaving Doucouré to stumble across the finish in dead last. A wall of Trammell, Olijars, Maurice Wignall and defending champion Anier García desperately leaning from 5 metres out, all hit the finish line at almost the same time. Trammell's perfectly timed dip edged García, to give him his second successive silver.

27 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 110m Hurdles Final

With reigning World champion Allen Johnson not in the final following his second-round fall, the door was wide open for Asian champion and record holder Xiang Liu of China to claim his first major global title following a bronze medal at the Paris World Championships and a silver at the Budapest World Indoors.

The 21-year-old World Junior record holder did not disappoint tonight and to those who might have regretted to watch Johnson and Xiang battle it up, the Chinese responded in the best of fashion by equalling the 11-year-old World record of Colin Jackson.

It is the second World record of the competition after Yelena Isinbayeva's 4.91m in the Pole Vault.

Just like Jackson had done at the 1993 Stuttgart World Championships, Xiang was the fastest out of the blocks tantalizingly close to the gun and a clear leader as early as the first barrier was cleared.

An awesome technician the Shangai-born athlete was gaining ground on his pursuers step after step, hurdle after hurdle with only France’s Ladji Doucouré running one lane inside relatively close behind.

Maurice Wignall, Terrence Trammell and Anier Garcia running in lanes 5, 6 and 7 respectively were fighting it hard for third with European silver medallist Stanislavs Olijars in lane 2 also in the mix.

Xiang was never to be caught. The Chinese powered through the last hurdle and stormed towards the finish line celebrating his Olympic gold medal, the first ever medal won by a Chinese male athlete in track and field.

"It is an amazing experience being the Olympic champion," said Xiang. When I was in the blocks all I could think of was the sound of the gun. My race went wonderfully from the start until the end."

"Still this feels like a miracle. I didn't dare to think I would get a medal of any kind here."

Way behind Xiang, Doucouré who has bettered the French national record twice this week, hit the ninth hurdle and lost his balance before smashing into the final barrier, stumbling and fading into eighth.

As the Frenchman was facing disaster, four men came off the last hurdle virtually level and desperately sprinted to the finish in the hope to finish among the top three. Sydney Olympic medallist Trammell took second again in 13.18 just two hundredths of a second clear of defending Olympic champion Garcia in 13.20.

While the American celebrated his third outdoor silver at a major championship, the Cuban seemed to hardly believe he had actually managed to grab a medal after injuries had devastated his 2003 campaign.

World Indoor bronze medallist Wignall came just one hundredth of a second off the bronze in fourth with Olijars awarded the same time of 13.21 in fifth.  

Pinpointed as the future star of the discipline, Xiang took China’s first track and field medal of the Games one he should be favourite to defend when the Olympics are held in his home country four years on.

110 m hurdles Men     Final 27 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 12.91 0,3   Liu Xiang China CHN 13 Jul 83 WR
2 13.18 0,3   Terrence Trammell United States USA 23 Nov 78  
3 13.20 0,3   Anier García Cuba CUB 9 Mar 76  
4 13.21 0,3   Maurice Wignall Jamaica JAM 17 Apr 76  
5 13.21 0,3   Staņislav Olijar Latvia LAT 22 Mar 79  
6 13.48 0,3   Charles Allen Canada CAN 29 Mar 77  
7 13.49 0,3   Mateus Facho Inocêncio Brazil BRA 17 May 81  
8 13.76 0,3   Ladji Doucouré France FRA 28 Mar 83  
26 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 110m Hurdles - Semi-Finals

For the third time in three days, 21yearold Ladji Doucouré of France ran the fastest time of all competitors in the 110m Hurdles.

His 13.06 winning performance in the second semi-final shove off another 16 hundredths of a second off the French national record he set two days ago when taking his first round heat in 13.18.

A former decathlete whose unorthodox position in the blocks is the result of serious back problems, Doucouré stormed out of the blocks in line with defending Olympic champion Anier Garcia of Cuba.

The older and more experience Garcia could not hold on to Doucouré’s tempo between the intervals and as the Cuban faded behind, the Frenchman was hitting the ground hard and making a huge impression.

Doucouré’s win was already secured as he cleared the last obstacle and just like others do, he cut his effort and just cruised to the finish.

“I wanted to score a good point today and show my opponents that it’s not just about them. Whatever happens in tomorrow’s final I am a happy man. The national record is what I wanted and I have it."

“I just need a lot of rest now and as far as the final is concerned I just want to run a clean race, I want to achieve a good technical performance.”

Fast finishing Terrence Trammell who is back in top shape following an appalling first round performance also advanced to what will mark his second Olympic final. The American clocked 13.17 in second.

Last year’s silver medallist in Paris and silver medallist also in Sydney four years ago Trammell is determined to go one better in tomorrow’s final.

Garcia held on to third (13.30) while former South American Junior champion Mateus Inocencio in fourth becomes the first Brazilian to make an Olympic final in the event.

There was another national record in the first semi-final courtesy of Maurice Wignall of Jamaica who crossed the line in 13.28 – an excellent improvement on his personal best 13.28 coming into the Olympics. 

But Wignall wasn’t the man of the race as his win was simply the result of China’s Xiang Liu’s jog to the finish. The Asian champion was once again the image of perfection as he did not hit a single hurdle on his way to the finish.

Liu was so confident of his superiority coming off the last barrier that he didn’t need to produce any more efforts. His just watched as Wignall out-dipped him by a mere hundredth of a second on the line.

Latvia’s Stanislavs Olijars, the former World Junior champion, made also a good impression as he ran stride by stride with Wignall. The 25-year-old crossed the line in third in a season’s best time of 13.20 ahead of Canada’s Charles Allen who was lucky to even make it to the finish as the former representative of Guyana hit all but the first hurdle.

The final will be held tomorrow night with Doucouré and Xiang - both 21 and both with a personal best time of 13.06 - expected to be the main protagonists.

110 m hurdles Men     Semifinal 1 26 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.17 -0,1 Q Maurice Wignall Jamaica JAM 17 Apr 76 NR
2 13.18 -0,1 Q Liu Xiang China CHN 13 Jul 83  
3 13.20 -0,1 Q Staņislav Olijar Latvia LAT 22 Mar 79  
4 13.23 -0,1 Q Charles Allen Canada CAN 29 Mar 77  
5 13.37 -0,1   Yoel Hernández Cuba CUB 12 Dec 77  
6 13.42 -0,1   Robert Kronberg Sweden SWE 15 Aug 76  
7 13.57 -0,1   Chris Pinnock Jamaica JAM 26 Mar 79  
  DQ     Duane Ross        
110 m hurdles Men     Semifinal 2 26 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.06 0 Q Ladji Doucouré France FRA 28 Mar 83 NR
2 13.17 0 Q Terrence Trammell United States USA 23 Nov 78  
3 13.30 0 Q Anier García Cuba CUB 9 Mar 76  
4 13.34 0 Q Mateus Facho Inocêncio Brazil BRA 17 May 81  
5 13.39 0   Dudley Dorival Haiti HAI 1 Sep 75  
6 13.47 0   Richard Phillips Jamaica JAM 26 Jan 83  
7 13.52 0   Felipe Vivancos Spain ESP 16 Jun 80  
  DNS 0   Yuniel Hernández Cuba CUB 28 Mar 81  
25 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 110m Hurdles - Quarter Finals

The curse which has been hanging on top sprint hurdlers at these Olympic Games struck once again.

The illustrious victim tonight was 1996 Olympic and four-time World champion Allen Johnson who despite brave attempts to remain in the race had to give up all hopes of gold when crashing into the ninth hurdle.

It all started bad for the 33-year-old American who seemed the most affected by Spain’s Felipe Vivancos’ false start in lane 2. In a race which included defending Olympic champion Anier Garcia of Cuba and European silver medallist Stanislavs Olijars of Latvia, one of very few men who defeated Johnson in the past, one needed to be in top shape to make it through.

Curiously nervous Johnson didn’t feel comfortable in his blocks and as the athletes prepared for the second start he requested time to resettle in the blocks. When the gun was eventually fired, Johnson came out of the blocks dead last with an appalling reaction time of 0.238.

Although trailing last at the first hurdle, Johnson rapidly moved up level with Garcia and Olijars who were comfortably in the lead before drama struck. Johnson heavily hit hurdle number four and then hurdle number five even harder and lost his stride pattern.

Totally unbalanced in the following interval, Johnson magically recovered his speed and was now running up a notch trying to make up ground on the rest of the field but was still out of the top four.

It looked like Johnson could miraculously still make it - and he would have - but smashing the ninth hurdle put an end to his Olympic campaign. The American dove under the last obstacle hands first to try and protect himself from hitting the wood, landed on the track and lay down there for long minutes unable to believe his Olympic Games had just ended.   

“I don’t know why,” said Johnson. “I just fell. I came to win the Olympic title but it didn’t work out. Maybe another time!”

Way in front Olijars and Garcia controlled the race and qualified respectively clocking 13.26 and 13.28. Jamaica’s Richard Phillips took third in 13.44.

The fastest qualifier of the field was France’s Ladji Doucouré who also ran the fastest time in yesterday’s first round. The 2003 World Indoor finalist comfortably won the first of four quarter finals in 13.23 with Charles Allen (CAN) and Robert Kronberg (SWE) second and third in 13.30 and 13.39 respectively.

The second fastest tonight but most impressive of the lot was Asian record holder Liu Xiang who won heat three in 13.26. The Chinese also looked nervous and false started once before coming out last of the blocks.

The 21-year-old was luckier and without touching a single barrier cruised to the line ahead of Yoel Hernandez of Cuba (13.29) and US champion Terrence Trammell (13.34).

“Allen is my idol,” said Liu. “so I do regret that he’s not in the semi-final. Without Allen the race is fully open.”

Heat number four was taken by Brazil’s Mateus Inocencio who also competed in the bobsleigh at the Winter Olympic Games. The South American improved his personal best to 13.33 and preceded Dudley Dorival of Haiti (13.39) and Maurice Wignall of Jamaica (13.39).

The fastest losers who advanced to tomorrow’s semi-finals include Yuniel Hernandez of Cuba, Duane Ross of the US, Christopher Pinnock of Jamaica and Vivancos.

110 m hurdles Men     Heat 1 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.23 0,4 Q Ladji Doucouré France FRA 28 Mar 83  
2 13.30 0,4 Q Charles Allen Canada CAN 29 Mar 77  
3 13.39 0,4 Q Robert Kronberg Sweden SWE 15 Aug 76  
4 13.53 0,4   Yevgeniy Pechonkin Russia RUS 9 Oct 73  
5 13.64 0,4   Joseph Berlioz Randriamihaja Madagascar MAD 30 Nov 75  
6 13.67 0,4   Jackson Quiñónez Ecuador ECU 12 Jun 80  
  DQ     Duane Ross        
  DNS 0,4   Damjan Zlatnar Slovenia SLO 16 Dec 77  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 2 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.26 0,2 Q Staņislav Olijar Latvia LAT 22 Mar 79  
2 13.28 0,2 Q Anier García Cuba CUB 9 Mar 76  
3 13.44 0,2 Q Richard Phillips Jamaica JAM 26 Jan 83  
4 13.48 0,2 Q Felipe Vivancos Spain ESP 16 Jun 80  
5 13.53 0,2   Mike Fenner Germany GER 24 Apr 71  
6 13.85 0,2   Stephen Jones Barbados BAR 25 Jul 78  
  DNF 0,2   Gregory Sedoc Netherlands NED 16 Oct 81  
  DNF 0,2   Allen Johnson United States USA 1 Mar 71  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 3 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.26 0,8 Q Liu Xiang China CHN 13 Jul 83  
2 13.29 0,8 Q Yoel Hernández Cuba CUB 12 Dec 77  
3 13.34 0,8 Q Terrence Trammell United States USA 23 Nov 78  
4 13.47 0,8 Q Chris Pinnock Jamaica JAM 26 Mar 79  
5 13.54 0,8   Márcio de Souza Brazil BRA 24 Jan 75  
6 13.54 0,8   Masato Naito Japan JPN 31 Jul 80  
7 13.64 0,8   Igor Peremota Russia RUS 14 Jan 81  
8 14.03 0,8   Paulo Villar Colombia COL 28 Jul 78  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 4 25 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.33 0 Q Mateus Facho Inocêncio Brazil BRA 17 May 81  
2 13.39 0 Q Dudley Dorival Haiti HAI 1 Sep 75  
3 13.39 0 Q Maurice Wignall Jamaica JAM 17 Apr 76  
4 13.46 0 Q Yuniel Hernández Cuba CUB 28 Mar 81  
5 13.55 0   Sergey Chepiga Russia RUS 5 Jun 82  
6 13.62 0   Shaun Bownes South Africa RSA 24 Oct 70  
7 13.70 0   Satoru Tanigawa Japan JPN 5 Jul 72  
8 13.77 0   Todd Jouda Matthews Sudan SUD 28 Jun 79  
24 AUG 2004 General News

Men's 110m Hurdles - Heats

Former World Youth champion Ladji Doucouré was the first ray of light in a so far disappointing French team.

The 21-year-old former Decathlete – European Junior gold in 2001 – won the opening heat of the men’s 110m Hurdles in a new personal best and national record of 13.18 – the fastest time of the day.

Despite the early hour and cutting his effort in the run-in, the fourth place finisher at the 2003 World Indoor Championships Doucouré still managed to improve the 18-year-old French record of Stéphane Caristan by 2 hundredths of a second.

A semi-finalist at last year’s World Championships, Doucouré preceded European silver medallist Stanislavs Olijars of Latvia whose second-place 13.27 effort didn’t seem to take much effort either.

Helped by a 1.5m/s tail wind Satoru Tanigawa of Japan and Joseph Berlioz Randriamihaja of Madagascar also set national records of 13.39 and 13.46 respectively. But while the Asian managed to hold on to third, the African was out-dipped by World Championships finalist Marcio Souza of Brazil who came back in the finishing stages of the race after badly clipping the third hurdle.

Both Souza (13.43) and Randriamihaja advanced to tomorrow’s second round.

US Trials champion Terrence Trammell, the defending silver medallist, was surprisingly never in contention for the leading positions in the second heat. If that had been a pre-race tactics it looked a bit scary for the 25-year-old World Championships runner-up who came a distant fifth in 13.51.

With only four athletes automatic qualifying, Trammell had to wait another 30 minutes before having the certainty that he would advance to the second round with the third fastest losing time.

In the mean-time the American had to watch his former compatriot Dudley Dorival of Haiti qualify out-right. The Edmonton bronze medallist won the race in a season’s best time of 13.39 ahead of the first of three Cubans Yoel Hernandez (13.41) and Jamaica’s Christopher Pinnock (13.42).

Another former American, Todd Matthews Jouda now running for Sudan set a national record of 13.47 in fourth.

Asian champion and record holder Xiang Liu had a much better first round in what marks his Olympics debut. Following the opening false start of Luis Sa of Portugal, Xiang stormed out of the blocks with a tantalizing reaction time of 0.128 and never lost control of his technique until he crossed the line in a relaxed 13.27.

Canada’s Charles Allen (13.35), Robert Kronberg of Sweden (13.47) and Igor Peremota of Russia (13.54) were the remaining automatic qualifiers but their performances were somewhat overshadowed by the Chinese’s display of talent.

Talent was certainly not missing in heat four as four-time World champion Allen Johnson used his ten-year international experience to advance to the next round making the least possible efforts.

Johnson clipped six hurdles on his way to the tape and was still ahead of the field as he dramatically slowed down in the final 30 metres letting Paulo Villar of Colombia savour the sweet taste of victory. The South American set a new national record of 13.44 and couldn’t contain his delight.

Brazil’s Mateus Inocencio also out-dipped Johnson with both men being awarded the same time of 13.45. In fourth Yevgeniy Pechonkin, husband of 400m Hurdles World record holder Yuliya Pechonkina, also advanced.

It was such a delightful sight to watch defending Olympic champion Anier Garcia return to his best shape after the Cuban missed out on the 2003 season through injury. The 28-year-old ran his fastest time of the year following a blistering start and a powerful 70 metres. Cutting his effort in the run-in Garcia stopped the clock at 13.24 well clear of American Duane Ross in second (13.39) who also reduced his speed dramatically.

Yet another national record was set with Stephen Jones of Barbados finishing in fourth in 13.56, just three hundredths of a second off Mike Fenner of Germany in third.  

The fifth and final heat saw the first four at the tape run their best time of the year. The win went to World Indoor bronze medallist Maurice Wignall who led a one-two finish for Jamaica. Wignall’s 13.30 was the result of a faultless display and a mastered technique over the hurdles.

21-year-old Richard Phillips improved his personal best to 13.39 in second while Jackson Quinonez of Ecuador, a semi-finalist at last year’s World Championships, set a new national record of 13.44 in third.

The third Cuban to make the cut, Yuniel Hernandez equalled his season’s best time 13.48 to finish fourth.

Amazingly no fewer than 11 national records were set with the slowest athlete in this morning’s heat Edy Jakariya lowering his own Indonesian record from 14.29 to 14.11.

110 m hurdles Men     Heat 1 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.18 1,5 Q Ladji Doucouré France FRA 28 Mar 83  
2 13.27 1,5 Q Staņislav Olijar Latvia LAT 22 Mar 79  
3 13.39 1,5 Q Satoru Tanigawa Japan JPN 5 Jul 72 NR
4 13.43 1,5 Q Márcio de Souza Brazil BRA 24 Jan 75  
5 13.46 1,5 Q Joseph Berlioz Randriamihaja Madagascar MAD 30 Nov 75 NR
6 13.47 1,5 Q Felipe Vivancos Spain ESP 16 Jun 80  
7 13.83 1,5   Jerome Crews Germany GER 20 Feb 77  
8 14.02 1,5   Nenad Lončar Serbia & Montenegro SCG 6 Mar 81  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 2 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.39 1,8 Q Dudley Dorival Haiti HAI 1 Sep 75  
2 13.41 1,8 Q Yoel Hernández Cuba CUB 12 Dec 77  
3 13.42 1,8 Q Chris Pinnock Jamaica JAM 26 Mar 79  
4 13.47 1,8 Q Todd Jouda Matthews Sudan SUD 28 Jun 79  
5 13.51 1,8 Q Terrence Trammell United States USA 23 Nov 78  
6 13.52 1,8 Q Shaun Bownes South Africa RSA 24 Oct 70  
7 13.66 1,8 Q Damjan Zlatnar Slovenia SLO 16 Dec 77  
8 13.87 1,8   Jurica Grabušić Croatia CRO 28 Mar 83  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 3 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.27 1,3 Q Liu Xiang China CHN 13 Jul 83  
2 13.35 1,3 Q Charles Allen Canada CAN 29 Mar 77  
3 13.47 1,3 Q Robert Kronberg Sweden SWE 15 Aug 76  
4 13.54 1,3 Q Igor Peremota Russia RUS 14 Jan 81  
5 13.56 1,3 Q Masato Naito Japan JPN 31 Jul 80  
6 13.80 1,3   Serhiy Demydyuk Ukraine UKR 5 Jun 82  
7 13.96 1,3   Park Tae-Kyong South Korea KOR 30 Jul 80  
8 14.01 1,3   Luís Sá Portugal POR 17 Mar 81  
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 4 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.44 -1,3 Q Paulo Villar Colombia COL 28 Jul 78 NR
2 13.45 -1,3 Q Mateus Facho Inocêncio Brazil BRA 17 May 81  
3 13.45 -1,3 Q Allen Johnson United States USA 1 Mar 71  
4 13.64 -1,3 Q Yevgeniy Pechonkin Russia RUS 9 Oct 73  
5 13.65 -1,3 Q Gregory Sedoc Netherlands NED 16 Oct 81  
6 13.68 -1,3   Shi Dongpeng China CHN 6 Jan 84  
7 13.85 -1,3   Robert Newton Great Britain GBR 10 May 81  
8 14.11 -1,3   Edi Jakariya Indonesia INA 18 Nov 83 NR
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 5 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.24 0,8 Q Anier García Cuba CUB 9 Mar 76  
2 13.53 0,8 Q Mike Fenner Germany GER 24 Apr 71  
3 13.56 0,8 Q Stephen Jones Barbados BAR 25 Jul 78 NR
4 13.59 0,8 Q Sergey Chepiga Russia RUS 5 Jun 82  
5 13.72 0,8   David Ilariani Georgia GEO 20 Jan 81  
6 13.74 0,8   Levente Csillag Hungary HUN 22 Mar 73  
7 13.75 0,8   Andy Turner Great Britain GBR 19 Sep 80  
  DQ     Duane Ross        
110 m hurdles Men     Heat 6 24 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 13.30 1,2 Q Maurice Wignall Jamaica JAM 17 Apr 76  
2 13.39 1,2 Q Richard Phillips Jamaica JAM 26 Jan 83  
3 13.44 1,2 Q Jackson Quiñónez Ecuador ECU 12 Jun 80 NR
4 13.48 1,2 Q Yuniel Hernández Cuba CUB 28 Mar 81  
5 13.76 1,2   Sultan Tucker Liberia LBR 24 Oct 78  
6 13.77 1,2   Tarmo Jallai Estonia EST 30 Jan 79  
7 13.81 1,2   Mubarak Ata Mubarak Saudi Arabia KSA 17 Dec 81  
  DNS 1,2   Redelen dos Santos Brazil BRA 24 Apr 76  
 
Detailed View
 

Results

Round 1

Qualification rule: The first four finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next eight fastest overall runners (q) qualified.

Heat 1

Wind: +1.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 8 Ladji Doucouré France 0.205 13.18 Q, NR
2 4 Staņislavs Olijars Latvia 0.154 13.27 Q
3 5 Satoru Tanigawa Japan 0.128 13.39 Q, NR
4 3 Márcio de Souza Brazil 0.162 13.43 Q, SB
5 7 Joseph-Berlioz Randriamihaja Madagascar 0.168 13.46 q, NR
6 1 Felipe Vivancos Spain 0.113 13.47 q, PB
7 2 Jerome Crews Germany 0.178 13.83  
8 6 Nenad Lončar Serbia and Montenegro 0.157 14.02  

Heat 2

Wind: +1.8 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 1 Dudley Dorival Haiti 0.169 13.39 Q, SB
2 4 Yoel Hernández Cuba 0.176 13.41 Q
3 8 Chris Pinnock Jamaica 0.192 13.42 Q, SB
4 2 Todd Matthews-Jouda Sudan 0.170 13.47 Q, NR
5 3 Terrence Trammell United States 0.185 13.51 q
6 5 Shaun Bownes South Africa 0.164 13.52 q
7 6 Damjan Zlatnar Slovenia 0.132 13.66 q, =NR
8 7 Jurica Grabušić Croatia 0.166 13.87  

Heat 3

Wind: +1.3 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Liu Xiang China 0.128 13.27 Q
2 6 Charles Allen Canada 0.149 13.35 Q, PB
3 7 Robert Kronberg Sweden 0.179 13.47 Q
4 5 Igor Peremota Russia 0.142 13.54 Q
5 2 Masato Naito Japan 0.162 13.56 q, SB
6 1 Serhiy Demydyuk Ukraine 0.163 13.80  
7 3 Park Tae-kyong South Korea 0.179 13.96  
8 8 Luís Sá Portugal 0.177 14.01  

Heat 4

Wind: −1.3 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Paulo Villar Colombia 0.193 13.44 Q, NR
2 5 Matheus Inocêncio Brazil 0.157 13.45 Q, =SB
3 2 Allen Johnson United States 0.176 13.45 Q
4 1 Evgeny Pechonkin Russia 0.150 13.64 Q
5 7 Gregory Sedoc Netherlands 0.186 13.65 q
6 8 Shi Dongpeng China 0.156 13.68  
7 6 Robert Newton Great Britain 0.176 13.85  
8 3 Edy Jakariya Indonesia 0.188 14.11 NR

Heat 5

Wind: +0.8 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 2 Anier García Cuba 0.158 13.24 Q, SB
2 4 Duane Ross United States 0.162 13.39 Q
3 7 Mike Fenner Germany 0.160 13.53 Q, SB
4 6 Stephen Jones Barbados 0.184 13.56 Q, NR
5 1 Sergey Chepiga Russia 0.160 13.59 q
6 8 David Ilariani Georgia 0.168 13.72  
7 3 Levente Csillag Hungary 0.148 13.74  
8 5 Andy Turner Great Britain 0.155 13.75  

Heat 6

Wind: +1.2 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 6 Maurice Wignall Jamaica 0.160 13.30 Q, =SB
2 6 Richard Phillips Jamaica 0.138 13.39 Q, PB
3 6 Jackson Quiñónez Ecuador 0.167 13.44 Q, NR
4 6 Yuniel Hernández Cuba 0.151 13.48 Q, =SB
5 6 Sultan Tucker Liberia 0.181 13.76  
6 6 Tarmo Jallai Estonia 0.150 13.77  
7 6 Mubarak Ata Mubarak Saudi Arabia 0.134 13.81  
  6 Redelén Melo dos Santos Brazil   DNS  

Round 2

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next four fastest overall runners (q) qualified.

Heat 1

Wind: +1.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 3 Ladji Doucouré France 0.198 13.23 Q
2 4 Charles Allen Canada 0.149 13.30 Q, PB
3 8 Robert Kronberg Sweden 0.154 13.39 Q, SB
4 5 Duane Ross United States 0.155 13.50 q
5 1 Evgeny Pechonkin Russia 0.151 13.53  
6 7 Joseph-Berlioz Randriamihaja Madagascar 0.210 13.64  
7 6 Jackson Quiñónez Ecuador 0.163 13.67  
  2 Damjan Zlatnar Slovenia   DNS  

Heat 2

Wind: +1.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 5 Staņislavs Olijars Latvia 0.169 13.26 Q
2 4 Anier García Cuba 0.159 13.28 Q
3 3 Richard Phillips Jamaica 0.161 13.44 Q
4 2 Felipe Vivancos Spain 0.154 13.48 q
5 8 Mike Fenner Germany 0.128 13.53 =SB
6 7 Stephen Jones Barbados 0.227 13.85  
  6 Allen Johnson United States 0.190 DNF  
  1 Gregory Sedoc Netherlands 0.238 DNF  

Heat 3

Wind: +1.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 6 Liu Xiang China 0.202 13.27 Q
2 4 Yoel Hernández Cuba 0.200 13.29 Q, SB
3 7 Terrence Trammell United States 0.220 13.34 Q
4 3 Chris Pinnock Jamaica 0.195 13.47 q
5 2 Márcio de Souza Brazil 0.165 13.54  
6 1 Masato Naito Japan 0.157 13.54 SB
7 8 Igor Peremota Russia 0.130 13.64  
8 5 Paulo Villar Colombia 0.176 14.03  

Heat 4

Wind: +1.5 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 4 Matheus Inocêncio Brazil 0.140 13.33 Q, PB
2 3 Dudley Dorival Haiti 0.157 13.39 Q, =SB
3 6 Maurice Wignall Jamaica 0.157 13.39 Q
4 1 Yuniel Hernández Cuba 0.137 13.46 q, SB
5 7 Sergey Chepiga Russia 0.190 13.55  
6 2 Shaun Bownes South Africa 0.156 13.62  
7 5 Satoru Tanigawa Japan 0.147 13.70  
8 8 Todd Matthews-Jouda Sudan 0.203 13.77  

Semifinals

Qualification rule: The first four finishers in each heat (Q) moved on to the final.

Semifinal 1

Wind: −0.1 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 7 Maurice Wignall Jamaica 0.162 13.17 Q, NR
2 4 Liu Xiang China 0.151 13.18 Q
3 6 Staņislavs Olijars Latvia 0.151 13.20 Q, SB
4 3 Charles Allen Canada 0.150 13.23 Q, PB
5 8 Duane Ross United States 0.157 13.30  
6 5 Yoel Hernández Cuba 0.174 13.37  
7 1 Robert Kronberg Sweden 0.124 13.42  
8 2 Chris Pinnock Jamaica 0.196 13.57  

Semifinal 2

Wind: 0.0 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1 5 Ladji Doucouré France 0.200 13.06 Q, NR
2 2 Terrence Trammell United States 0.165 13.17 Q
3 6 Anier García Cuba 0.172 13.30 Q
4 3 Matheus Inocêncio Brazil 0.154 13.34 Q
5 4 Dudley Dorival Haiti 0.162 13.39 =SB
6 7 Richard Phillips Jamaica 0.143 13.47  
7 8 Felipe Vivancos Spain 0.144 13.52  
  1 Yuniel Hernández Cuba   DNS  

Final

Wind: +0.3 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Result Notes
1st 4 Liu Xiang China 0.139 12.91 =WR
2nd 6 Terrence Trammell United States 0.154 13.18  
3rd 7 Anier García Cuba 0.169 13.20 SB
4 5 Maurice Wignall Jamaica 0.164 13.21  
5 2 Staņislavs Olijars Latvia 0.174 13.21  
6 1 Charles Allen Canada 0.139 13.48  
7 8 Matheus Inocêncio Brazil 0.169 13.49  
8 3 Ladji Doucouré France 0.204 13.76  
 28 AUG 2004 General News

Xiang equals World record - first Chinese male athlete to win Olympic gold

Athens, GreeceIt all began on a cold summer evening in Lausanne, Switzerland on Tuesday 2 July 2002.

Standing behind the starting blocks ready to compete in his first European Grand Prix meeting 18-year-old Xiang Liu was looking straight at the finish line, concentrating on the task ahead of him.

Two years before at the IAAF World Junior Championships the Shanghai-born teenager was a disappointing fourth in the 110m Hurdles final when the day before he had superbly won his semi-final heat in a new national Junior record 13.75.

Since, Xiang vowed he would never miss out on major Championships medal positions.

World Junior record in 2002

In Lausanne, Xiang was running in the B race, not able to be given a lane in the main race which offered a star-studded field with World record holder Colin Jackson, four-time World champion Allen Johnson, Olympic champion Anier Garcia, European silver medallist Stanislavs Olijars, and Olympic silver medallist Terrence Trammell.

Xiang knew it was his chance to show his idols what a fantastic up-and-coming athlete he was and he didn’t miss his chance as, assisted by a 1.6m/s tail wind he set a new World Junior record of 13.12. In breaking Renaldo Nehemiah’s mark which had stood as the best ever Junior time since 1978, Xiang was now part of the elite.

Incidentally, he defeated 1996 Olympic silver medallist Mark Crear and Florian Schwartoff who had been third in Atlanta. Not bad for a first Grand Prix meeting.

Allen Johnson's autograph

After the race, Xiang went up to Allen Johnson, his all-time favourite and idol, and asked for his autograph unaware that two years later he would be the one to sign tons of autographs.

Winner of the A race in 13.03, Anier Garcia remembers the evening very well.

“Ever since he set that World Junior record, I’ve been watching him,” said Garcia three weeks before the Olympic Games. “I remember that night very well. I won the A race and he took the B race. I remember looking at the clock and saying WOW! 13.12! Who is that guy?”

“Since then, I knew he would do well,” concluded Garcia.

Two years on and Xiang didn’t just do well in his first Olympic Games, he did GREAT!

Equals World record

Blasting out of the blocks, tantalizing close to the gun, Xiang, now 21 years of age, executed a perfect technical race and stormed through the finish line in an equalling World record performance of 12.91.

One can only regret that American record holder Johnson was not in the Olympic final following his second-round fall as the race might have been even faster. In his ten years at the top of the event, Johnson now 33 years of age has been running after the World record and coming tantalizing close to improving it but never able to turn his dream into reality.

Twice he stopped the clock at 12.92, and when winning the 1996 Olympic Trials he was timed in 12.95 despite several technical mistakes. To this day, Johnson considers that race as his best and believes it would have been a World record performance had he not faltered technically.

First for China

Xiang was one who didn’t falter last night when he became the first male athlete to win an Olympic track and field gold medal for China.

When Xiang and Johnson raced each other at the Rome Golden League meeting, Johnson was given the win but the two clocked the same time and the American declared:

“Xiang has an excellent technique. He is very strong and very fast. He is so young and is very ambitious. I think he will do very well in the future.”

No pressure

And although Xiang is one not likely to put himself under pressure, he was awesome in fulfilling all the expectations. He mastered the Olympic final from gun to tape, didn’t falter, pushed his efforts right to the finish and celebrated like a teenager, when the score board converted the initial 12.94 to an official 12.91.

“Before the final I knew a lot of people were expecting me to do well but I never thought I would take the gold medal. I never allowed any of those thoughts in my head,” said Xiang.

“I just wanted to perform at my best and raise my technique to the best level. I was confident that if I succeeded in doing so I would have a chance of entering the top three. The gold medal was not the least expected. It was a huge surprise for me. Just as huge a surprise as running under 13 seconds for the first time was.”

“Given the Asian physiology, few expected that a Chinese would ever be able to run under 13 seconds. I believe this is like a sort of miracle. What has happened is incredible but I will keep on working very hard in the future and you can expect more miracles to happen.”

Shortly after breaking the World Junior record two years ago Xiang had been questioned about his expectations for the future and his answer was remarkably down to earth.

“A top 8 placing in the Olympics will be great.”

Inspired by tennis-table

When he was younger, the feats of table tennis star Deng Yaping - who won gold at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics - used to inspire him and he would dream of emulating them. He opted for athletics, a choice which proved excellent.

Liu started serious training for the 110m Hurdles in 1999 and after three months, he already clocked 14.13.

“When I started to train seriously, my dad (a supervisor) was supportive. But, like most mothers I guess, my mum was against the idea. She wanted me to study. But, after I began to have some success, she came to accept my decision to be a competitive athlete. Now both my parents support me a lot.”

A semi-finalist at the Edmonton World Championships, Xiang admits his fondest memory from canada was one which came off the track.

“I admire Michael Johnson. His times for the 200m and 400m are really amazing. I’m very proud that I have taken a picture with him.”

Two bronze and one silver before Athens gold

Since, Xiang won bronze at the 2003 World Indoor Championships in Birmingham, another bronze at the Paris World Championships, and then silver in Budapest World Indoor Champs this winter. All three championships have been won by Johnson.

“I felt great pity when I saw Johnson falling. Allen is my idol and I would have liked to compete against him. He prepared very hard for these Games and I believe it mustn’t be easy for him to go out like that.”

Looking forward to Beijing 2008

Xiang came into the Olympic Games having taken his personal best and Asian record down to 13.06 – two times – and was carrying the country’s best hopes for gold. Undoubtedly he will be the centre-stage athlete when the Games move on from Athens and the build-up preparation for Beijing 2008 gets underway.

“I am very excited that the next Olympic Games will be held in China. I am confident that the Beijing Games will be the most successful ones. For sure the organisation will be one of the best.”

“As far as I am concerned, I will be 26 years old then and 26 is the optimal age for an athlete. It is a golden age and I will make sure I will not miss such a huge opportunity to perform well in my home country.”

China’s medal tally at Olympic Games counted 3 gold, 3 silver and 5 bronze medals before the Athens Olympic Games but no gold had ever been won by a male athlete let alone a male sprinter.

“In China we have excellent relationships between athlete and coach. I hope my result today will change the general attitude and it will stop people from thinking that Asians cannot be successful sprinters and hurdlers. I want Asians to be considered as good as Americans and Europeans sprinters, and I will train even harder to prove yet and again that there is plenty of talent in China.”

Laura Arcoleo for the IAAF

 

 

 

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