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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Men's 200 m

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top four in each heat advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 18, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next four fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 20, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next eight fastest advanced to the quarter-finals.
(Competitors: 63; Countries: 55; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF   2008_olympic_stadium.jpg 
After his 100m win, Bolt was a clear favourite. Asked just before the race what would happen, the 1968 champion Tommie Smith responded that Bolt would win by at least four metres, and that “he could surpass that” – that being Michael Johnson’s world record of 19.32. Off to a good start, Bolt raced away from the field, passing 100m in 9.96 with a full two metres advantage over Crawford and Martina. He steadily increased his lead, not letting up and reached the line in 19.30 (19.296) to beat a record that was thought to be unapproachable. Bolt himself said “I’m shocked ... it is a dream come true”. Behind him Martina ran a splendid 19.82 while Spearmon caught Crawford on the line, 19.95 to 19.96. Sadly for Spearmon, he was seen to have stepped on the inner line of his lane and was disqualified. When the US team examined the film of this, it was noticed that Martina had made a similar transgression. The Dutch Antillean was then also disqualified leaving Crawford as silver medallist, the best title defence since Carl Lewis in 1988. He said “that’s not the way I want to win a medal”, and less sombrely “everything I had in me I left on the track. You might find some of my skin cells out there”. Later in August at Zurich’s Weltklasse, Crawford generously gave his silver medal to Martina along with a note: “Churandy I know this can’t replace the moment, but I want you to have this because I believe it’s rightfully yours!”
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Having won the 100 four days earlier in world record fashion, and being considered better at the 200, Usain Bolt was a heavy favorite. His world record in the 100 had come despite shutting down at 80 metres and celebrating thru the tape. But in the 200, the world record of 19.32 set by Michael Johnson at the Atlanta Olympics, seemed inviolable. Some track experts stated that they expected that mark to last thru their lifetimes. Bolt had made plans that this time there would be no celebrating and he would run hard throughout, trying to break Johnson's record. Unfortunately, the race was run into a wind of 0.9 metres/second. But it mattered not. Bolt, running in lane five, made up the stagger on lane six by 50 metres, and hit the century mark in 10.0 flat, faster than Johnson had run in his world record (10.12). And he did not shut it down, taking down Johnson's vaunted world record with a 19.30 clocking. He had definitely established himself as the fastest man in the world.
The other podium places took a bit to sort out. The second-placed finisher originally was Churandy Martina (AHO), with Wallace Spearman (USA) in third. Americans Shawn Crawford and Walter Dix finished fourth and fifth, respectively. But a protest was lodged against Spearman, claiming that he run out of his lane in the curve. The US officials viewed the tape and had to accept the ruling but in doing so, they also noted that Martina had also run out of his lane and lodged a similar protest. Both runners were disqualified and Crawford and Dix moved up to the medal places. The Netherlands Antilles protested to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, stating that the American protest had not been made within the time limit, but this protest was eventually not allowed.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record United States Michael Johnson (United States) 19.32 s Atlanta, United States 1 August 1996
Olympic record  Michael Johnson (USA) 19.32 s Atlanta, United States 1 August 1996

The following new world and Olympic record was set during this competition.

Date Event Athlete Time (sec)
20 August Final  Usain Bolt (JAM) 19.30 World record icon.svg Olympic record icon.svg

Qualification

Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) was able to enter up to three entrants providing they had met the A qualifying standard (20.59) in the qualifying period (1 January 2007 to 23 July 2008). NOCs were also permitted to enter one athlete providing he had met the B standard (20.75) in the same qualifying period.

 
        Results        

The Men's 200 metres at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on 18–20 August at the Beijing National Stadium.

The qualifying standards were 20.59 s (A standard) and 20.75 s (B standard).

Usain Bolt set a new world record of 19.30 s in the medal race and won by the largest margin of victory (0.52 s; after disqualifications 0.64 s) in an Olympic 200 m (Walter Tewksbury had a ca. 0.6 seconds margin in his victory in the first Olympic 200 m race in 1900).

Controversy arose within minutes after the medal race when Wallace Spearmon, who finished third in 19.95 s was disqualified for stepping out of his lane. United States officials filed a protest, but conceded after seeing the video and noticing that silver medalist Churandy Martina (19.82 s) who had celebrated the second ever Olympic medal for the Netherlands Antilles, also may have stepped out of his lane. They filed an appeal to disqualify Martina, which after more than an hour of deliberation was granted, through which the United States obtained both the silver and bronze medals. On March 6, 2009, the Court of Arbitration for Sport rejected an appeal by the National Olympic Committee of the Netherlands Antilles against Martina's disqualification. Shawn Crawford, who had been awarded the Olympic silver medal, reportedly gave his medal to Martina on August 28, 2008 in a tremendous show of sportsmanship.

Men's 200m - FINAL

All he said was he wanted to win. Who was he kidding?

Usain Bolt did, of course, win the 200m gold to become the first man since Carl Lewis 24 years ago to complete the men's sprint Olympic double, that was never really in doubt.

But you know what he really wanted. Michael Johnson's iconic World record of 19.32 and the world was shaken tonight as Bolt shaved 0.02 from Johnson's mark to become the first man since Jamaican Don Quarrie in the 1970s to hold the world 100m and 200m records simultaneously.

All season Bolt had raised eyebrows and nudges that he could be the man to lower the 12-year-old World record mark set at the Atlanta Olympic Games. Earlier this season, he ran a lifetime best of 19.67 to win in Athens and in London he recorded 19.76 almost jogging down the home straight to to raise expectations he could, maybe just could, threaten Johnson's record.

He had showboated to a world record and an Olympic 100m gold on Saturday, but if he was to smash a second world record - at least Johnson's incredible figures - they would be absolutely no room for showboating. And they wasn't.

Bolt repeatedly brushed the top of his head and fired his imaginary Bolt of lightning as his name was announced to the crowd, but as soon as he settled in his blocks the giant Jamaican meant business.

He caught the stagger on Zimbabwe's Brian Dzingai within the first 40m and swung into the home straight with a clear lead on his pursuers - which included Churandy Martina and Shawn Crawford.

Down the home straight his monster stride ate up the ground as he continued to spreadeagle the field. Yet this was a very different Bolt to one we had seen in the past. He was not joking and toying with the field as he has in other races this season, he had a grimace on his face as he powered down the home straight and was 100 per cent focused on taking the world record.

He stormed down the final 50m and as he thundered across the line the time read 19.31 - later rounded down to 19.30 - the stadium erupted, Bolt raised his hands aloft in elation. He'd done it.

Bolt himself admitted he was stunned at breaking the record.

"I knew the track was a fast track but I didn't think this was possible," said Bolt, who also recorded the biggest winning victory margin - of 0.66 - in the history of the event at the Olympic Games.

"I'm shocked, I am still shocked. I have been aspiring to the world record for so long. It is a dream come true. I got out good, I ran the corner as hard as possible and once I entered the straight told myself to 'keep it up, don't die on me now.'"

What went on behind was almost forgotten in the euphoria of Bolt's World record breaking run. However, controversy raged.

First up, Wallace Spearmon of the USA who had crossed the line third in 19.85 and was gleefully joining in the post-race celebrations with Bolt when he discovered he had been disqualified for running out of his lane.

That was not all. Churandy Martina assumed he made history to became the first man from the Netherlands Antilles to win an Olympic track and field medal, setting a national record of 19.82 after crossing the line second.

However, the US lodged a protest that he, too, had run out of his lane, and he suffered the same fate as Spearmon.

What this all meant was Shawn Crawford, the defending champion, was upgraded to silver with 19.96 and his US team-mate Walter Dix shifted up the overall standings to take bronze in 19.98. 

It was not, however, something which sat comfortably with Crawford.

"It feel kind of weird. It feels like a charity case," he said. 

For the record, Dzingai was fourth (20.22), Christian Malcolm of Great Britain fifth in 20.40 and Kim Collins of St Kitts and Nevis sixth in 20.59.

All at least had the privilege of being involved in the fastest 200m race in history.      

For Bolt, who celebrates his 22nd birthday tomorrow, the future is limitless.

When Johnson ran his stunning 19.32 in Atlanta he was aged 28 and most knew that run represented the high water mark in his career. But with Bolt, still so young, what more can he can go to achieve?

As the world and athletics statisticians everywhere salivate at the prospect, it is perhaps fitting that Johnson has the final word on the subject, simply describing the stellar Jamaican as 'superman.' Enough said. 

Steve Landells for the IAAF       

200 m Men     Final 20 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 19.30 -0,9   Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86 WR
2 19.96 -0,9   Shawn Crawford United States USA 14 Jan 78  
3 19.98 -0,9   Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
4 20.22 -0,9   Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe ZIM 29 Apr 81  
5 20.40 -0,9   Christian Malcolm Great Britain GBR 3 Jun 79  
6 20.59 -0,9   Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
  DQ -0,9   Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84  
  DQ -0,9   Wallace Spearmon United States USA 24 Dec 84  

Men's 200m - Semi-finals

 

That Usain Bolt, he's such a tease.

After cruising effortlessly through the first two rounds yesterday the 91,000 packed inside the Bird's Nest Stadium were hoping for some fireworks from the Olympic 100m champion.

On this occasion it was not to be. We will have to wait until tomorrow's final for that to happen.

Bolt, in heat two, blasted past Wallace Spearmon on his outside within the first 40m and, remember, Spearmon is the 2007 World bronze medallist.

The giant Jamaican entered the straight level with the defending Olympic champion Shawn Crawford before he turned off the gas, almost cheekily allowing the American to take the lead.

Then, almost with a shrug of the shoulders, he extended that giant stride ever so slightly to ensure he would advance to the final as heat winner in 20.09.

In Crawford's defence he also looked in fine fettle clocking 20.12 for second. However, few would be betting he finishes as close to Mr Bolt in the final.

Spearmon recovered from the shock of seeing Bolt surge past him at 40m to battled back to clinch third in 20.14.

The other qualifier from heat two was Kim Collins of St Kitts and Nevis who ran 20.25 for fourth Collins better known as a 100m man, he was, of course, the World champion in that event in 2003 but he has suprised himself with his efforts over 200m to advance to the final.

There was disappointment for Pan American Games champion Brendan Christian who missed out on a final spot. The Antiguan, who had looked like a genuine medal threat in the quarter finals, had to settle for fifth in 20.29.

Stephane Buckland of Mauritius, sixth at the Athens Games, also missed out in sixth (20.48) with Marlon Devonish of Great Britain in seventh (20.57). Norweigian record-holder Jaysuma Saidy Ndure did not start.    

With the greatest respect heat one was very much the hors d'ouevre before the main course.

Churandy Martina of the Netherlands' Antilles made a blistering start and held a narrow lead from Zimbabwe's Brian Dzingai on his inside. Walter Dix, of the USA, was two metres further down in third just ahead of Great Britain's Christian Malcolm.

Martina, who finished fourth in the 100m final on Saturday, is a class act and impressively maintained his form to stop the clock in a new national record of 20.11 - 0.06 quicker than his previous best.

Dzingai also looked comfortable, equalling his season's best of 20.17. Dix worked hard down the second half of the race to finish third in 20.19. However, the US champion will need to show more in the final if he is to add to the bronze he won in the 100m.

Great Britain's Christian Malcolm set a season's best of 20.25 to qualify to tomorrow night's final - eight years after reaching the final and finishing fifth at the Sydney Olympics.

There was disappointment for Paul Hession - a heat winner in the quarter final. The Irish record holder was never in contention and had to settle for fifth on 20.35.

Jamaica's former World 200m silver medallist Christopher Williams was sixth in 20.45. Jared Connaughton of Canada seventh in 20.55 with Kristof Beyens of Belgium eighth in 20.69.

Interestingly, three countries - St Kitts and Nevis, Zimbabwe and Netherlands' Antilles have qualified athletes for a Olympic 200m final for the first time.

Steve Landells for the IAAF 

200 m Men     Semifinal 1 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.11 0,1 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84 NR
2 20.17 0,1 Q Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe ZIM 29 Apr 81  
3 20.19 0,1 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
4 20.25 0,1 Q Christian Malcolm Great Britain GBR 3 Jun 79  
5 20.38 0,1   Paul Hession Ireland IRL 27 Jan 83  
6 20.45 0,1   Chris Williams Jamaica JAM 15 Mar 72  
7 20.58 0,1   Jared Connaughton Canada CAN 20 Jul 85  
8 20.69 0,1   Kristof Beyens Belgium BEL 13 Jul 83  
200 m Men     Semifinal 2 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.09 0,1 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
2 20.12 0,1 Q Shawn Crawford United States USA 14 Jan 78  
3 20.14 0,1 Q Wallace Spearmon United States USA 24 Dec 84  
4 20.25 0,1 Q Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
5 20.29 0,1   Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda ANT 11 Dec 83  
6 20.48 0,1   Stéphan Buckland Mauritius MRI 12 Jan 77  
7 20.57 0,1   Marlon Devonish Great Britain GBR 1 Jun 76  
  DNS 0,1   Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway NOR 1 Jan 84  

Men's 200m - Round 2

 

After jogging his morning heat to finish second, yes, I repeat second, behind Rondell Sorrillo of Trinidad, the Olympic 100m champion Usain Bolt's pride, not to mention his spellbinding class, was never going to allow a second successive defeat.

Running a superb bend Bolt entered the home straight in a comfortable lead before cutting back on the throttle over the final 70m to win heat one in a ridiculously easy 20.29.

Behind him the defending champion Shawn Crawford of the USA eased down rather more than he would have liked in the final 15m and only just took the second automatic qualifying position for tomorrow night's semi-finals in 20.42 - just 0.01 ahead of former world 100m champion Kim Collins of St Kitts and Nevis and Great Britain's Marlon Devonish.

Collins was awarded the third and final automatic spot for tomorrow's semi-finals after a photo-finish although Devonish also advanced as one of four fastest losers as did Jared Connaughton of Canada (20.45) for fifth.

Brian Dzingai was the fastest qualifier in this morning's heats and once again hinted at his potential to land Zimbabwe's first Olympic track and field medal with an impressive heat two win.

The diminutive Dzingai rounded the curve level with American Walter Dix but powered ahead down the home straight to stop the clock in 20.23.

Dix, who won the 100m Olympic bronze medal, faded a little down the home stretch but held on for second in 20.27 - 0.01 ahead of the third automatic qualifier, the fast finishing Christopher Williams of Jamaica.

Behind them Great Britain's Christian Malcolm (20.30) and Stephan Buckland of Mauritius (20.39) progressed to the semi-finals as fastest losers.

Heat three was marred by a delayed start because of the noise created down the back straight by the ongoing men's long jump final, but when it did get underway Antigua's Brendan Christian was the boss.

He entered the home straight two metres clear and the Pan American champion maintained his superiority to record 20.26.

Antigua, like Zimbabwe, have also never won an Olympic track and field medal but they will be cautiously optimistic following this impressive display by Christian.

Churandy Martina of the Netherlands' Antilles, who finished fourth in the 100m final on Saturday, safely made the semi-finals recording 20.42 for second. The fast finshing Kristof Beyens of Belgium grabbed the third automatic spot in 20.50. T

The USA advanced all three men to the semi-finals, although Wallace Spearmon was forced to work much harder than he would have liked.

Spearmon crawled out of his blocks and was down in fifth and four metres behind the leader Jaysuma Saidy Ndure of Norway at halfway.

However, the 2007 World bronze medallist showed his undoubted class down the home straight to snatch second in 20.39. Ireland's Paul Hession came with an late surge to take the heat won in 20.32 - within 0.02 of his lifetime best. Ndure, who was easing down, secured third in 20.46.

Steve Landells for the IAAF 

200 m Men     Heat 1 17 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.29 0,1 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
2 20.42 0,1 Q Shawn Crawford United States USA 14 Jan 78  
3 20.43 0,1 Q Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
4 20.43 0,1 Q Marlon Devonish Great Britain GBR 1 Jun 76  
5 20.45 0,1 Q Jared Connaughton Canada CAN 20 Jul 85  
6 20.55 0,1   Amr Ibrahim Mostafa Seoud Egypt EGY 10 Jun 86 NUR
7 20.87 0,1   Rolando Palacios Honduras HON 3 May 87  
8 20.96 0,1   Ángel David Rodríguez Spain ESP 25 Apr 80  
200 m Men     Heat 2 17 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.23 0,2 Q Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe ZIM 29 Apr 81  
2 20.27 0,2 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
3 20.28 0,2 Q Chris Williams Jamaica JAM 15 Mar 72  
4 20.30 0,2 Q Christian Malcolm Great Britain GBR 3 Jun 79  
5 20.37 0,2 Q Stéphan Buckland Mauritius MRI 12 Jan 77  
6 20.62 0,2   Roman Smirnov Russia RUS 2 Sep 84  
7 20.63 0,2   Shinji Takahira Japan JPN 18 Jul 84  
8 20.95 0,2   Matic Osovnikar Slovenia SLO 19 Jan 80  
200 m Men     Heat 3 17 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.26 0,4 Q Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda ANT 11 Dec 83  
2 20.42 0,4 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84  
3 20.50 0,4 Q Kristof Beyens Belgium BEL 13 Jul 83  
4 20.58 0,4   Marcin Jędrusiński Poland POL 28 Aug 81  
5 20.58 0,4   Aaron Armstrong Trinidad and Tobago TTO 14 Oct 77  
6 20.65 0,4   Obinna Metu Nigeria NGR 12 Jul 88  
7 21.07 0,4   Sandro Viana Brazil BRA 26 Mar 77  
8 21.48 0,4   Marc Schneeberger Switzerland SUI 5 Jul 81  
200 m Men     Heat 4 17 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.32 0,3 Q Paul Hession Ireland IRL 27 Jan 83  
2 20.39 0,3 Q Wallace Spearmon United States USA 24 Dec 84  
3 20.45 0,3 Q Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway NOR 1 Jan 84  
4 20.63 0,3   Rondell Sorrillo Trinidad and Tobago TTO 21 Jan 86  
5 20.66 0,3   Ramil Guliyev Azerbaijan AZE 29 May 90 NR NJR
6 20.76 0,3   Visa Hongisto Finland FIN 9 Apr 87  
7 21.04 0,3   Thuso Mpuang South Africa RSA 15 Aug 85  
  DNF 0,3   Marvin Anderson Jamaica JAM 12 May 82  

Men's 200m - Round 1

 

A total of 63 men lined up for the opening round of the 200m, but, in reality it was all about one man, No.2163, Usain Bolt.

The Jamaican sensation had created history on Saturday night as he set a World record of 9.69 en route to winning 100m gold, quite literally, for fun.

Yet the 200m has long been his speciality, so expectation is sky high he can not only land a second gold but push Michael Johnson's iconic World record of 19.32.

All eyes were fixed on the lanky Bolt in heat five, and guess what? He lost!

But don't panic, he comfortably qualified in second as he jogged down the home stretch in 20.64 - without a care in the world. Trinidad's Rondell Sorillo will at least be able to tell his grandchildren he beat the great Bolt - albeit in an opening heat - as he ran 20.58. For the record, Kristof Beyens of Belgium finished third in 20.69.
 
Elsewhere, the reigning champion Shawn Crawford began his title defence will a comfortable victory the opening heat. The US athlete rounded the bend with a commanding advantage before cruising down the home straight to register 20.61.

Poland's former European Under-23 champion, Marcin Jedrusinski, finished 0.03 behind to qualify second.

The fourth heat served up a slight surprise as Russian champion Roman Smirnov shaded first spot by 0.01 - in 20.76 - from the US champion Walter Dix.

Midway down the home straight Dix, the Olympic 100m bronze medallist, was in danger of missing out on the three automatic qualification positions, before he stepped on the gas over the final 50m to ensure his safe passage through to tonight's quarter finals. 

The third member of the US contingent in this event, Wallace Spearmon, flexed his muscles with an impressive heat six win in 20.46. The 2007 world bronze medallist cantered home 0.08 ahead of Norwegian record holder Jaysuma Saidy Ndure.
 
Brian Dzingai, 27, was the fastest qualifier for tonight's quarter final round. The improving Zimbabwean recorded an impressive 20.25 ahead of Great Britain's Christian Malcolm (20.42) in the second heat.

Great Britain's former World Indoor champion Marlon Devonish edged 2003 World 100m champion Kim Collins in the third heat. Devonish recorded a season's best 20.49 with Collins, of St Kitts and Nevis, 0.06 further back.

Nigerian champion Obinna Metu took top spot in the seventh heat in 20.62, which also saw the end of 2003 World bronze medallist Shingo Suetsugu's challenge. The Japanese athlete finished sixth in 20.93.

In the eighth and final heat Aaron Armstrong of Trinidad shaded a close run heat eight in 20.57 - just 0.01 ahead of Antigua's Pan American champion Brendan Christian. 

Steve Landells for the IAAF
200 m Men     Heat 1 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.61 0,1 Q Shawn Crawford United States USA 14 Jan 78  
2 20.64 0,1 Q Marcin Jędrusiński Poland POL 28 Aug 81  
3 20.98 0,1 Q Stéphan Buckland Mauritius MRI 12 Jan 77  
4 21.05 0,1   Jiří Vojtík Czech Republic CZE 2 Jul 81  
5 21.09 0,1   Fanuel Kenosi Botswana BOT 3 May 88  
6 21.36 0,1   Adam Harris Guyana GUY 21 Jul 87  
7 21.55 0,1   Khalil Al-Hanahneh Jordan JOR 11 May 80  
8 22.16 0,1   Solomon Bayoh Sierra Leone SLE 18 May 90  
200 m Men     Heat 2 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.25 0 Q Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe ZIM 29 Apr 81  
2 20.42 0 Q Christian Malcolm Great Britain GBR 3 Jun 79  
3 20.53 0 Q Chris Williams Jamaica JAM 15 Mar 72  
4 20.58 0 Q Shinji Takahira Japan JPN 18 Jul 84  
5 20.75 0 Q Amr Ibrahim Mostafa Seoud Egypt EGY 10 Jun 86  
6 20.87 0 Q Thuso Mpuang South Africa RSA 15 Aug 85  
7 21.15 0   Daniel Grueso Colombia COL 30 Jul 85  
8 21.46 0   Arnaldo Abrantes Portugal POR 27 Nov 86  
200 m Men     Heat 3 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.49 -0,4 Q Marlon Devonish Great Britain GBR 1 Jun 76  
2 20.55 -0,4 Q Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 5 Apr 76  
3 20.85 -0,4 Q Marvin Anderson Jamaica JAM 12 May 82  
4 20.89 -0,4 Q Matic Osovnikar Slovenia SLO 19 Jan 80  
5 20.90 -0,4   Chris Lloyd Dominica DMA 10 Oct 80  
6 20.93 -0,4   Heber Viera Uruguay URU 29 Apr 79  
7 21.20 -0,4   Cristián Reyes Chile CHI 5 Aug 86  
8 21.26 -0,4   Franklin Nazareno Ecuador ECU 24 Apr 87  
200 m Men     Heat 4 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.76 -1,1 Q Roman Smirnov Russia RUS 2 Sep 84  
2 20.77 -1,1 Q Walter Dix United States USA 31 Jan 86  
3 20.81 -1,1 Q Rolando Palacios Honduras HON 3 May 87  
4 20.87 -1,1 Q Ángel David Rodríguez Spain ESP 25 Apr 80  
5 21.15 -1,1   Bruno de Barros Brazil BRA 7 Jan 87  
6 21.55 -1,1   Desislav Gunev Bulgaria BUL 21 Jan 86  
7 21.68 -1,1   Vyacheslav Muravyov Kazakhstan KAZ 14 Jul 82  
8 22.31 -1,1   Nikolai Portelli Malta MLT 17 Dec 81  
200 m Men     Heat 5 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.58 -0,1 Q Rondell Sorrillo Trinidad and Tobago TTO 21 Jan 86  
2 20.64 -0,1 Q Usain Bolt Jamaica JAM 21 Aug 86  
3 20.69 -0,1 Q Kristof Beyens Belgium BEL 13 Jul 83  
4 20.86 -0,1   Marc Schneeberger Switzerland SUI 5 Jul 81  
5 21.06 -0,1   José Acevedo Venezuela VEN 30 Mar 86  
6 21.38 -0,1   Igor Bodrov Ukraine UKR 9 Jul 87  
7 21.80 -0,1   Mohamad Siraj Tamim Lebanon LIB 2 Jan 85  
8 22.31 -0,1   Oleg Juravlyev Uzbekistan UZB 17 Feb 82  
9 23.39 -0,1   Juan Miguel Zeledón Nicaragua NCA 30 Dec 85  
200 m Men     Heat 6 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.46 -0,5 Q Wallace Spearmon United States USA 24 Dec 84  
2 20.54 -0,5 Q Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway NOR 1 Jan 84  
3 20.59 -0,5 Q Paul Hession Ireland IRL 27 Jan 83  
4 20.91 -0,5   Seth Amoo Ghana GHA 20 Mar 83  
5 21.22 -0,5   Ronalds Arājs Latvia LAT 29 Nov 87  
6 21.54 -0,5   Jayson Jones Belize BIZ 15 Aug 77  
7 21.68 -0,5   Nabie Fofanah Guinea GUI 8 Feb 80  
  DNF -0,5   Brian Barnett Canada CAN 10 Feb 87  
200 m Men     Heat 7 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.62 -0,7 Q Obinna Metu Nigeria NGR 12 Jul 88  
2 20.78 -0,7 Q Ramil Guliyev Azerbaijan AZE 29 May 90  
3 20.78 -0,7 Q Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles AHO 3 Jul 84  
4 20.84 -0,7 Q Sandro Viana Brazil BRA 26 Mar 77  
5 20.93 -0,7   Jamial Rolle Bahamas BAH 16 Apr 80  
6 20.93 -0,7   Shingo Suetsugu Japan JPN 2 Jun 80  
7 21.00 -0,7   Omar Juma Al-Salfa United Arab Emirates UAE 15 Oct 89  
200 m Men     Heat 8 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 20.57 -0,3 Q Aaron Armstrong Trinidad and Tobago TTO 14 Oct 77  
2 20.58 -0,3 Q Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda ANT 11 Dec 83  
3 20.60 -0,3 Q Jared Connaughton Canada CAN 20 Jul 85  
4 20.62 -0,3 Q Visa Hongisto Finland FIN 9 Apr 87  
5 20.98 -0,3   Marco Cribari Switzerland SUI 7 Jul 85  
6 20.98 -0,3   James Dolphin New Zealand NZL 17 Jun 83  
7 21.06 -0,3   Zhang Peimeng China CHN 13 Mar 87  
 
Detailed View
 

Round 1

The first round was held on 18 August. The first three runners of each heat (Q) plus the next eight overall fastest runners (q) qualified for the second round.

Heat 1

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 4 Shawn Crawford United States 20.61 Q 0.216
2 6 Marcin Jędrusiński Poland 20.64 Q 0.199
3 7 Stephan Buckland Mauritius 20.98 Q 0.229
4 1 Jiří Vojtík Czech Republic 21.05   0.165
5 9 Fanuel Kenosi Botswana 21.09   0.211
6 3 Adam Harris Guyana 21.36   0.163
7 5 Khalil Al-Hanahneh Jordan 21.55 SB 0.184
8 2 Solomon Bayoh Sierra Leone 22.16   0.216

Heat 2

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 3 Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe 20.25 Q 0.172
2 5 Christian Malcolm Great Britain 20.42 Q, SB 0.178
3 4 Christopher Williams Jamaica 20.53 Q 0.166
4 8 Shinji Takahira Japan 20.58 q, SB 0.175
5 2 Amr Ibrahim Mostafa Seoud Egypt 20.75 q 0.172
6 9 Thuso Mpuang South Africa 20.87 q 0.166
7 6 Daniel Grueso Colombia 21.15   0.232
8 7 Arnaldo Abrantes Portugal 21.46   0.173

Heat 3

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 8 Marlon Devonish Great Britain 20.49 Q, SB 0.157
2 5 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 20.55 Q 0.175
3 7 Marvin Anderson Jamaica 20.85 Q 0.175
4 9 Matic Osovnikar Slovenia 20.89 q, SB 0.189
5 2 Chris Lloyd Dominica 20.90   0.185
6 6 Heber Viera Uruguay 20.93   0.210
7 4 Cristián Reyes Chile 21.20   0.165
8 3 Franklin Nazareno Ecuador 21.26   0.174

Heat 4

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 5 Roman Smirnov Russia 20.76 Q 0.166
2 3 Walter Dix United States 20.77 Q 0.185
3 9 Rolando Palacios Honduras 20.81 Q 0.202
4 8 Ángel David Rodríguez Spain 20.87 q 0.162
5 2 Bruno de Barros Brazil 21.15   0.162
6 7 Desislav Gunev Bulgaria 21.55   0.178
7 6 Vyacheslav Muravyev Kazakhstan 21.68   0.206
8 4 Nicolai Portelli Malta 22.31   0.180

Heat 5

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Rondel Sorrillo Trinidad and Tobago 20.58 Q 0.193
2 4 Usain Bolt Jamaica 20.64 Q 0.177
3 2 Kristof Beyens Belgium 20.69 Q 0.148
4 9 Marc Schneeberger Switzerland 20.86 q 0.137
5 7 José Acevedo Venezuela 21.06   0.270
6 8 Ihor Bodrov Ukraine 21.38   0.172
7 3 Mohamad Siraj Tamim Lebanon 21.80 PB 0.206
8 1 Oleg Juravlyov Uzbekistan 22.31   0.145
9 5 Juan Zeledon Nicaragua 23.39   0.173

Heat 6

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 3 Wallace Spearmon United States 20.46 Q 0.184
2 4 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway 20.54 Q, SB 0.161
3 2 Paul Hession Ireland 20.59 Q 0.190
4 8 Seth Amoo Ghana 20.91   0.140
5 7 Ronalds Arājs Latvia 21.22   0.218
6 5 Jayson Jones Belize 21.54   0.162
7 6 Nabie Foday Fofanah Guinea 21.68   0.247
  9 Bryan Barnett Canada DNF   0.164

Heat 7

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Obinna Metu Nigeria 20.62 Q 0.168
2 9 Ramil Guliyev Azerbaijan 20.78 Q, SB 0.175
3 8 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 20.78 Q 0.172
4 4 Sandro Viana Brazil 20.84 q 0.159
5 5 Jamial Rolle Bahamas 20.93   0.162
6 2 Shingo Suetsugu Japan 20.93   0.185
7 7 Omar Jouma Bilal Al-Salfa United Arab Emirates 21.00   0.184
  3 Alexander Nelson Great Britain DNS    

Heat 8

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Aaron Armstrong Trinidad and Tobago 20.57 Q 0.183
2 8 Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda 20.58 Q 0.164
3 7 Jared Connaughton Canada 20.60 Q 0.146
4 9 Visa Hongisto Finland 20.62 q, SB 0.145
5 3 Marco Cribari Switzerland 20.98   0.171
6 2 James Dolphin New Zealand 20.98   0.161
7 5 Zhang Peimeng China 21.06 SB 0.150
  4 Samuel Francis Qatar DNS    

Round 2

Round 2 was held on 18 August. First 3 in each heat(Q) and the next 4 fastest(q) advance to the Semifinals.

Heat 1

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 4 Usain Bolt Jamaica 20.29 Q 0.186
2 7 Shawn Crawford United States 20.42 Q 0.198
3 6 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 20.43 Q, SB 0.233
4 5 Marlon Devonish Great Britain 20.43 q, SB 0.146
5 9 Jared Connaughton Canada 20.45 q 0.151
6 3 Amr Seoud Egypt 20.45 NR 0.151
7 8 Rolando Palacios Honduras 20.87   0.248
8 2 Ángel David Rodríguez Spain 20.96   0.172

Heat 2

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 4 Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe 20.23 Q 0.182
2 7 Walter Dix United States 20.27 Q 0.162
3 8 Christopher Williams Jamaica 20.28 Q 0.159
4 6 Christian Malcolm Great Britain 20.30 q, SB 0.188
5 9 Stephan Buckland Mauritius 20.37 q, SB 0.188
6 5 Roman Smirnov Russia 20.62   0.161
7 3 Shinji Takahira Japan 20.63   0.185
8 2 Matic Osovnikar Slovenia 20.95   0.171

Heat 3

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 5 Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda 20.26 Q 0.166
2 8 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 20.42 Q 0.155
3 9 Kristof Beyens Belgium 20.50 Q 0.155
4 6 Marcin Jędrusiński Poland 20.58 =SB 0.199
5 4 Aaron Armstrong Trinidad and Tobago 20.58   0.155
6 7 Obinna Metu Nigeria 20.65   0.195
7 2 Sandro Viana Brazil 21.07   0.168
8 3 Marc Schneeberger Switzerland 21.48   0.156

Heat 4

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 8 Paul Hession Ireland 20.32 Q, SB 0.190
2 4 Wallace Spearmon United States 20.39 Q 0.202
3 6 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway 20.45 Q, SB 0.131
4 7 Rondel Sorrillo Trinidad and Tobago 20.63   0.164
5 5 Ramil Guliyev Azerbaijan 20.66 NR 0.174
6 3 Visa Hongisto Finland 20.76   0.124
7 2 Thuso Mpuang South Africa 21.04   0.162
  9 Marvin Anderson Jamaica DNF   0.187

Semifinals

Semifinals were held on 19 August. First 4 in each heat (Q) advance to the Final.

Semifinal 1

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 7 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 20.11 Q, NR 0.154
2 6 Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe 20.17 Q, =SB 0.184
3 4 Walter Dix United States 20.19 Q 0.161
4 3 Christian Malcolm Great Britain 20.25 Q, SB 0.181
5 5 Paul Hession Ireland 20.38   0.175
6 9 Christopher Williams Jamaica 20.45   0.217
7 2 Jared Connaughton Canada 20.58   0.146
8 8 Kristof Beyens Belgium 20.69   0.211

Semifinal 2

Rank Lane Athlete Nationality Time Notes React
1 6 Usain Bolt Jamaica 20.09 Q 0.175
2 5 Shawn Crawford United States 20.12 Q 0.196
3 7 Wallace Spearmon United States 20.14 Q 0.196
4 8 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 20.25 Q, SB 0.191
5 4 Brendan Christian Antigua and Barbuda 20.29   0.135
6 2 Stephan Buckland Mauritius 20.48   0.141
7 3 Marlon Devonish Great Britain 20.57   0.258
  9 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Norway DNS    

Final

Wind: -0.9 m/s

Rank Lane Name Nationality Reaction Time Result Notes
1st 5 Usain Bolt Jamaica 0.182 19.30 WR
2nd 4 Shawn Crawford United States 0.210 19.96  
3rd 8 Walter Dix United States 0.151 19.98  
4 6 Brian Dzingai Zimbabwe 0.185 20.22  
5 3 Christian Malcolm Great Britain 0.212 20.40  
6 2 Kim Collins Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.165 20.59  
DSQ 7 Churandy Martina Netherlands Antilles 0.144 19.82  
DSQ 9 Wallace Spearmon United States 0.167 19.95  
 
 

 

 

 

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