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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Women's 200 m

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top four in each heat advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 19, 2008 Format: Top three in each heat and next four fastest advanced to the semi-finals.
Date Finished: August 21, 2008 Format: Top four in each heat and next eight fastest advanced to the quarter-finals.
(Competitors: 46; Countries: 38; Finalists: 8)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg
The 2004 Champion had married sprinter Omar Brown in December 2007. After a 23.04 heat and 22.64 second round, she controlled the first semi-final, easing down with her last few strides to clock 22.19 ahead of Stewart, Lee and Ferguson McKenzie who therefore became a double sprint finalist for the third games in succession. Felix won the other semi-final in 22.33, though appeared to be below top form due to a hip problem. Campbell-Brown and Stewart started best in the final, and as the curve unwound Campbell-Brown was a metre up on Stewart with Felix a fraction behind. Despite Felix’s best efforts, Campbell-Brown extended her lead and finished in 21.74 to become the equal eighthfastest of all-time, and the quickest Olympian since 1992. She increased her winning margin over Felix in comparison with 2004 and thus became only the second woman to win consecutive titles at the 200m.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
The favorite was American Allyson Felix who had won the World Championships in 2005 and 2007 and been world ranked #1 since 2005. In Athina, when she was only 18, she had won silver behind Jamaica’s Veronica Campbell (now Campbell-Brown). In five meetings from 2005-2007, Felix had defeated Campbell-Brown every time with comfortable margins, but Campbell-Brown had slightly the better of 2008 performances, and there was little to choose between them. These two won their semi-finals, setting the stage for the confrontation in the final. Campbell-Brown was drawn in lane four, just inside Felix. On the curve she closed the stagger on Felix, and had 2/10ths of a second on her at 100 metres, Felix only in fourth place at that point. Felix closed quickly on the field, but could not make up any ground on Campbell-Brown who maintained her margin to win the gold medal, Felix in second. Jamaica added a second medal when Kerron Stewart added bronze to the silver she had won in the 100. Bahraini runner Rakia Al-Gassra made it to the semis, a remarkable performance considering she ran fully covered up, in accordance with Muslim customs.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record United States Florence Griffith-Joyner (United States) 21.34 s Seoul, South Korea 29 September 1988
Olympic record  Florence Griffith-Joyner (USA) 21.34 s Seoul, South Korea 29 September 1988

No new world or Olympic records were set for this event.

 
        Results        

The women's 200 metres at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on 19–21 August (final) at the Beijing National Stadium.

Allyson Felix, the young American athlete and already a double World champion, entered the 200m race in Beijing as a favorite for the gold. Defending champion Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica also appeared to be in great form, setting a new personal best of 21.94 seconds at the Olympic trials.

In the final, Campbell-Brown had the quickest start and made up the stagger very quickly on Allyson Felix, who had been drawn in the lane outside of her. Running a stellar curve and accelerating out of the bend, the Jamaican athlete held her form to cross the line in 21.74 seconds, the fastest time of the decade and a new personal best.

Veronica Campbell-Brown, who suffered from injuries that led to disappointment in the 200m in the 2007 World Championships, returned to form to become only the second woman in history to win back-to-back Olympic 200m titles. Allyson Felix was once again relegated to the silver medal in a seasonal best of 21.93, the second-fastest time of her career. Jamaican Kerron Stewart won the bronze medal by just a hundredth of a second.

The qualifying standards were 23.00 s (A standard) and 23.20 s (B standard).
 

Women's 200m - FINAL

 

Veronica CampbellBrown became only the second woman is history to successfully defend the Olympic 200m title as Jamaica once again served a knock out blow to US sprint hopes.

All week, here inside the Bird's Nest Stadium, the reggae boys and girls from the remarkable nation of sprint champions have bruised US egos and they did it again tonight at the expense of two-time World champion Allyson Felix, who had to settle for the silver medal for the second successive Olympics.
 
Campbell-Brown was imperious as she blasted to the quickest time over 200m for ten years and climbed to joint eighth on the all-time lists with a sizzling 21.74.

Felix did run a season's best of 21.93 - only the second time in the history of the event two women have dipped below 22 seconds in the final - but that will be of little consolation to the American.

Jamaica's Kerron Stewart dealt the USA a further bloody nose as she edged a tight battle for bronze by 0.01 from Muna Lee.

Victory for Campbell-Brown made up for the bitter disappointment of missing out on the Jamaican 100m team - she finished fourth at the trials - but as she was entered for just one individual event in Beijing it may have focused the mind and worked in her favour.

The 26-year-old Jamaican now matches the feat of East German Barbel Wockel, who won back to back Olympic 200m titles in 1976 and 1980, and she vowed to attempt to make history and land a hat-trick of titles.

"I have four more years (until the London 2012 Games)," said Campbell-Brown. "If I can stay like this. Fear is not something I bring to the track."

Felix, meanwhile, was putting a brave face on defeat.

"The start was bad. The lane was bad, but I'm blessed to be here in this position," she explained. "I'm not surprised, but I'm disappointed. I expected more from myself." 

The final was expected to be a tight showdown between Felix and Campbell-Brown, although in reality the 'head to head' battle was over in the first 50m as the Jamaican running in lane four caught the stagger and passed a shellshocked Felix.

The defending champion entered the straight with a slight advantage from Stewart and American Muna Lee, who had made an agressive start from the outside lane nine. Felix, however, had conceded five metres on Campbell-Brown and was down in fourth.

Coming out of the transition phase, though, Campbell-Brown put down the hammer and opened into a clear advantage. Stewart appeared her nearest pursuer with Felix at last starting to haul back into contention.

The final quarter of the race was all about the leader and the time as she maintained her clear three metre advantage.

Felix battled back with her Gazelle-type stride to claim the silver with Stewart adding a 200m bronze to the 100m silver she won on Sunday in 22.00. Lee had to settle for the cruel fourth spot in a personal best of 22.01.

The third US athlete, Marshevet Hooker, set a personal best of 22.34 for fifth - 0.02 ahead of Sherone Simpson.

Behind the blanket of US and Jamaican sprinters, the bronze medallist from the 2004 Athens Games, Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of Bahamas claimed seventh in 22.61 - 0.07 ahead of Cydonie Mothersill, the first ever Olympic track and field finalist from the Cayman Islands.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

Already a great champion, Campbell-Brown comes of age as a personality

 

Four years ago, a shy Jamaican sprinter made her slow, diffident way past the scrums of journalists deep in the bowels of the Olympic Stadium in Athens.

Veronica Campbell had just become the first woman from her small Caribbean nation to win an individual Olympic gold medal in a flat sprint. But the wary 22-year-old seemed rather unprepared, bemused even, about the amount of attention she was attracting.

Ask her a question and she would look at you with a frown, as if to say, ‘Why do you want to know that?’ A one or two-word whisper would follow, the words muffled by a strong Jamaican accent.

It’s something of a cliché to say that a lot changes in four years. Indeed, if you look at the result of the women’s 200m final it seems as if nothing has changed – Veronica Campbell gold, Allyson Felix silver. Same result, different city.

But the Olympic 200m champion of 2008 is a very different person. She’s Veronica Campbell-Brown for a start, having married Omar Brown, the 2006 Commonwealth Games 200m champion in November last year. She’s also faster – as her 21.74 victory in Beijing’s National Stadium on Thursday (21) shows.

A blessing I didn’t run the 100m

For the record it was the fastest 200m by a woman for 10 years and places the Jamaican firmly among the top ten on the World all-time list, a result she says, of being able to train outdoors all year at her new base in Orlando, Florida, of being injury free, and, ironically, of not having run in the 100m first.

“I’ve been in the best shape of my life all year,” she says. “Since I ran
22.05 in 2004 I’ve been trying to get my 200m back to where I want it to be.
And with the help of my coach and the motivation of people around me I’ve been able to do that.”

“Although I always want to run a double at a championships coming out here I was feeling fresh and good throughout the rounds, so I think in the end it was a blessing I didn’t run the 100m.”

Given that she retained her title, the first woman to do so since German Bärbel Eckert in 1976 and 1980, and that she’s also the reigning World 100m champion, surely Campbell-Brown should now be regarded as one of the greatest women sprinters of all time. “I didn’t think I was going to run that fast,” is all she says.

An example to Jamaican women

But the Campbell-Brown 2008 version is not just faster, she has changed in other respects too. She’s still a quiet, even introverted, personality, but she’s no longer the shy debutant of the team. She was the flag bearer for her country at the Opening Ceremony, for example, and is described by one of the team doctors as a captain of the Jamaican women.

She’s certainly an example to the fast young guns in green and yellow who are making this the most successful Olympic Games in Jamaican history.

“Veronica’s our leader, definitely,” says Kerron Stewart, the 24-year-old who’s won Olympic 100m silver and 200m bronze in her first Games. “She was running when I was in college, so she’s definitely someone I look up to.”

“I think Veronica leads by example and when you have people like that in the camp you know you’re on the right path. The same calm persona that you see on the track, that’s what we get from her. She’s a great athlete and a great person.”

It’s a role Campbell-Brown herself is willing to acknowledge. After a hectic evening that involved winning the Olympic 200m, being interviewed by dozens of TV crews, running anchor for the Jamaican sprint relay team, collecting her gold medal at the ceremony, visiting doping control, and attending a badly behind-schedule press conference, Campbell-Brown eventually stood for a few moments to chat with patient members of the written press.

“Yeah, I’m a bit more experienced than the others,” she says. “I always like to set an example for others around me to follow so, with that said, maybe I could classify myself as a leader.”

“I was the flag bearer and I was recently honoured by my country – an honour of distinction,” she adds with a smile.

I realised that I’ve got to do my part

Indeed, it was partly a sense of team responsibility that helped propel Campbell-Brown to her gold medal. Having watched the remarkable Bolt, and seen her teammates clean sweep the women’s 100m final, Campbell-Brown felt anxious about her place at the Jamaican party.

“I was extremely nervous before this race,” she says. “More than I’ve been before. In Athens I wasn’t Olympic champion so there wasn’t the same pressure. But now as Olympic champion there was pressure to defend my title, and the way Bolt ran and everything that was going in the 100m, I realised that I’ve got to do my part.”

“I felt as the defending champion I had to come out and compete. And with everybody running so fast, I felt I had to get out there and run as hard as I could.”

The final was pitched as another showdown between Campbell-Brown and Felix, the American who has won both World Championship titles since the Jamaican became Olympic champion in Athens. Last year in Osaka Felix was supreme, but Campbell-Brown says she learned from those defeats and knew exactly what to do to win in Beijing.

“I know Allyson is a great competitor,” she says. “But the thing that I know how to do is to get away early and hope that they don’t catch me. That’s what I tried to do. I tried to run the curve as hard as I could because that is my strong part.

“With Allyson over the years, when she beat me I realised that I was coming off the curve too close to her, and then she just pulled away from me. So the main thing for me tonight was to get away from her and the rest of the field and hopefully they wouldn’t catch me by the time of the finish.”

Jamaica - a great tradition in the sprints

Campbell-Brown’s victory confirmed Jamaica’s complete dominance of the sprints in Beijing, leaving the US with no Olympic gold medallists at 100 or 200 for the first time since 1976 (discounting the boycotted Moscow Games of 1980). And with US out of the relays as well, Jamaica looks set to add both 4x100m titles too.

Such results inevitably prompt questions about how a country of 2.7 million people can be so comprehensively outgunning one of 300 million in such headline events. For Campbell-Brown it’s a question of tradition.

“It doesn’t matter that we have a small population,” she says. “What we have had in Jamaica is a great tradition in the sprints – Merlene Ottey, Don Quarrie. I don’t think a lot of people realise how motivated we are by competing and training hard. We just love competing.”

They love the “fun” they’re having too. “As a team we are dominating these Olympics,” says Stewart. “Bolt set it off and after that the Jamaican camp just went crazy.

“We all have confidence that we can go out there and get the job done. That we are dominating like we are is no surprise,” she says. “This is just our time and this Olympics is a special place to show ourselves. This is the Jamaicans’ Olympics.”

On Friday, Jamaica’s sprinters are likely to take centre stage again. No doubt Usain Bolt will be dancing his way to another gold.

But, in her own quiet, measured way, Veronica Campbell-Brown, will leading the way too. After all, she has another title to defend.

Matthew Brown for the IAAF

200 m Women     Final 21 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 21.74 0,6   Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 21.93 0,6   Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
3 22.00 0,6   Kerron Stewart Jamaica JAM 16 Apr 84  
4 22.01 0,6   Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
5 22.34 0,6   Marshevet Hooker United States USA 25 Sep 84  
6 22.36 0,6   Sherone Simpson Jamaica JAM 12 Aug 84  
7 22.61 0,6   Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
8 22.68 0,6   Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
 

Women's 200m - Semi-Finals

 

This was always expected to be a two way battle between the defending champion Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica and World champion Allyson Felix of the USA and the semi-finals have confirmed this belief.

The pair looked supreme in winning their respective semi-finals and we are set for a treat in tomorrow night's final as Jamaica and the USA, the two superpowers of world sprinting, provide six of the eight finalists.

Defending champion Veronica Campbell-Brown kept alive her hopes of becoming the first women to successfully defend this title since Barbel Wockel of East Germany achieved the feat in 1980 with an eye-catching victory in the first semi-final.

Campbell-Brown made a blistering start and quickly made up the stagger on European Under-23 champion Yuliya Chermoshanskaya of Russia.

Campbell-Brown's compatriot Kerron Stewart also ran a hard first 100m and the pair entered the straight stride for stride with Muna Lee, of the USA, a metre further down.

It was Campbell-Brown, however, with her familiar wide arm action who opened up a clear lead on the opposition to stop the clock in 22.19. A stride behind were Stewart and Lee, who was given the same time of 22.29.

Critically, however, Stewart was awarded second in a photo finish which gives her the advantage of one of the middle four lanes in tomorrow night's final.

Running from lane nine, former World 200m champion Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie of the Bahamas snatched the fourth and final spot for the final in 22.51. Chermonshanskaya just missed out in fifth (22.57). Susanthika Jayasinghe of Sri Lanka, the 2000 Olympic 200m bronze medallist, finished seventh in 22.98.

Allyson Felix was a majestic winner of the second semi-final in 22.33. Jamaica's Sherone Simpson was quickest out of the blocks and she held a slight at halfway with Marshevet Hooker, in lane nine, also prominent.

But it was Felix, with her beautifully rhythmic stride who effortlessly pulled clear of the field over the final 80m to signal her intentions ahead of the final.

Hooker, the US Trials third placer, grabbed second in 22.50 shading a photo-finish verdict from Simpson after both recorded the same time.

Cydonie Mothersill, fourth in 22.61, made history to become the first athlete from the Cayman Islands to reach an Olympic track and field final.

Former European champion Muriel Hurtis-Houairi of France missed out in fifth in 22.71 with Bahrain's Asian Games champion Roqaya Al-Gassra sixth in 22.75.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

200 m Women     Semifinal 1 20 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.19 0 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 22.29 0 Q Kerron Stewart Jamaica JAM 16 Apr 84  
3 22.29 0 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
4 22.51 0 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
5 22.57 0   Yuliya Chermoshanskaya Russia RUS 6 Jan 86  
6 22.95 0   Nataliya Pyhyda Ukraine UKR 30 Jan 81  
7 22.98 0   Susanthika Jayasinghe Sri Lanka SRI 17 Dec 75  
8 23.12 0   Roxana Díaz Cuba CUB 16 May 81  
200 m Women     Semifinal 2 20 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.33 -0,2 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
2 22.50 -0,2 Q Marshevet Hooker United States USA 25 Sep 84  
3 22.50 -0,2 Q Sherone Simpson Jamaica JAM 12 Aug 84  
4 22.61 -0,2 Q Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
5 22.71 -0,2   Muriel Hurtis France FRA 25 Mar 79  
6 22.72 -0,2   Rakia Al-Gasara Bahrain BRN 6 Sep 82  
7 22.83 -0,2   Emily Freeman Great Britain GBR 24 Nov 80  
8 23.22 -0,2   Aleksandra Fedoriva-Shpayer Russia RUS 13 Sep 88  

Women's 200m - Quarter-finals

 

They probably didn't want to be in the same heat at this stage of the competition but that's what they got. 

The 'big two' - World champion Allyson Felix of the USA and Jamaica's Olympic champion Veronica Campbell-Brown - head to head in heat one of round two.

Well if either gained a psychological edge from heat one of round two it was probably Campbell-Brown who drew first blood, although both looked very easy.

The Jamaican made the more impressive start and held a one metre lead from Felix into the home stretch. At one point she opened up a two metre advantage, although the gap was reduced to about a metre at the finish line. Campbell clocking 22.64 - 0.13 clear of Felix. 

In a loaded heat the third automatic qualifying position went to Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie, the 2001 World 200m champion, of the Bahamas in 22.77. Cydonie Mothersill, of the Cayman Islands, was one of the four next fastest to advance to tomorrow night's semi-finals recording 22.83 for fourth. 

Bahrain's Asian Games 200m champion Roqaya Al-Gassra was an eye-catching winner of her morning heat and backed this up with a second round victory in heat two. Al-Gassra, 25, held a slight advantage entering the home straight and powered away from the oppositon to cross the line in 22.76.

Former European champion Muriel Hurtis-Houairi of France secured second in 22.89 - 0.05 clear of the third automatic qualifier Susanthika Jayasinghe, the 2000 Olympic bronze medallist, of Sri Lanka.

Heat three served up a surprise as Yuliya Chermonshanskaya, the European Under-23 champion, shattered her PB by 0.14 to win in 22.63. The 22-year-old Russian finished like an express train from lane nine to cross the line first and even put her hands to her mouth in surprise at what she had achieved.

Before Chermonshanskaya's late surge the heat had been dominated by Jamaica's Olympic 100m silver medallist Kerron Stewart and US Trials third place finisher Marshevet Hooker. Both qualified comfortably. Stewart in 22.74 and Hooker in 22.76.

The fourth heat ensured a full complement of three Jamaican and three US athletes progressed to the semi-finals.

Sherone Simpson, who had featured in Jamaica's clean sweep of the podium in the 100m final on Sunday by sharing the silver medal, attacked the bend to advance fastest from the quarter finals in 20.60.

Muna Lee, of the USA, bagged second in 22.83. Great Britain's Emily Freeman finished strongly to claim the third automatic spot in 22.95.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

200 m Women     Heat 1 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.64 0 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 22.74 0 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
3 22.77 0 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
4 22.83 0 Q Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
5 23.22 0   Ionela Tîrlea Romania ROU 9 Feb 76  
6 23.35 0   Evelyn dos Santos Brazil BRA 11 Apr 85  
7 23.37 0   Laverne Jones-Ferrette United States Virgin Islands ISV 16 Sep 81  
  DNS 0   Guzel Khubbieva Uzbekistan UZB 2 May 76  
200 m Women     Heat 2 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.76 0 Q Rakia Al-Gasara Bahrain BRN 6 Sep 82  
2 22.89 0 Q Muriel Hurtis France FRA 25 Mar 79  
3 22.94 0 Q Susanthika Jayasinghe Sri Lanka SRI 17 Dec 75  
4 22.98 0 Q Roxana Díaz Cuba CUB 16 May 81  
5 23.04 0 Q Aleksandra Fedoriva-Shpayer Russia RUS 13 Sep 88  
6 23.27 0   Damola Osayomi Nigeria NGR 26 Jun 86  
7 23.40 0   Darlenis Obregón Colombia COL 21 Feb 86  
8 23.48 0   Inna Eftimova Bulgaria BUL 19 Jun 88  
200 m Women     Heat 3 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.63 0,3 Q Yuliya Chermoshanskaya Russia RUS 6 Jan 86  
2 22.74 0,3 Q Kerron Stewart Jamaica JAM 16 Apr 84  
3 22.76 0,3 Q Marshevet Hooker United States USA 25 Sep 84  
4 23.03 0,3 Q Nataliya Pyhyda Ukraine UKR 30 Jan 81  
5 23.06 0,3   Kadiatou Camara Mali MLI 4 May 81  
6 23.51 0,3   Adrienne Power Canada CAN 11 Dec 81  
7 23.56 0,3   Vincenza Calì Italy ITA 15 Oct 83  
8 23.61 0,3   Sheniqua Ferguson Bahamas BAH 24 Nov 89  
200 m Women     Heat 4 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.60 0 Q Sherone Simpson Jamaica JAM 12 Aug 84  
2 22.83 0 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
3 22.95 0 Q Emily Freeman Great Britain GBR 24 Nov 80  
4 23.15 0   Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
5 23.17 0   Virgil Hodge Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 17 Nov 83  
6 23.28 0   Natalya Rusakova Russia RUS 12 Dec 80  
7 23.77 0   Eleni Artymata Cyprus CYP 16 May 86  
8 23.77 0   Allison George Grenada GRN 3 Jan 88  

Women's 200m - First round

This event has been billed as the battle between World champion Allyson Felix and Olympic champion Veronica Campbell-Brown but with a soft qualification of the top four from each heat plus the eight next fastest it was never going to provide any real clues for the rest of the competition.

It was a nice and easy opening for Felix, who coasted to heat one victory in 23.02. The pre-event favourite from the USA rounded the bend with a slight advantage from Susanthika Jayasinghe before striding out to a comfortable morning outing.

Jayasinghe, the 2000 Olympic bronze medallist from Sri Lanka, was 0.02 behind and also advanced.

Veronica Campbell-Brown, the defending champion, also found the exercise of qualifying for the next round very straight forward.

The Jamaican, who surprisingly missed out of qualifying for her national team in the 100m, put in the hard work over the first half of the race before easing to a heat five win in 23.04 - 0.02 in front of Kadiatou Camara of Mali.

Muna Lee, of the USA, tried to run the disappointment of finishing fifth in the 100m out of her system and topped the qualifiers for tonight's quarter finals to win heat two in an impressive 22.71.

In a high quality race, former European champion Muriel Hurtis-Houairi of France was 0.01 behind Lee with Cydonie Mothersill of the Cayman Islands third in 22.76.

Russia's European Under-23 champion Yuliya Chermoshanskaya also dipped below 23 seconds in 22.98 to take the fourth automatic qualifying position.

Belgium's European champion Kim Gevaert, who has struggled with injury this season and failed to progress beyond the semi-finals of the 100m, did not start in heat two. 

Marshavet Hooker, the third place finisher at the US Trials, comfortably landed victory in heat three in 23.07. Running from lane three she finished a stride clear of 2001 World 200m champion Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie (23.22) of the Bahamas.

Heat four was taken by Asian Games champion Roqaya Al-Gassra. Running in her familiar eye-catching white body suit and hijab she powered down the home straight to record 22.81. UK champion Emily Freeman qualified second in 22.95 with Olympic 100m silver medallist, Kerron Stewart of Jamaica, grabbing third in 23.03.

Natallia Pygyda of the Ukraine was the surprise winner of heat six in 22.90. Pygyda, who was second in the European Cup 400m in June, finished one place ahead of Jamaican Sherone Simpson, who shared the silver medal with Stewart in the women's 100m on Sunday night. Simpson ran 22.94.

Steve Landells for the IAAF

200 m Women     Heat 1 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 23.02 0,2 Q Allyson Felix United States USA 18 Nov 85  
2 23.04 0,2 Q Susanthika Jayasinghe Sri Lanka SRI 17 Dec 75  
3 23.14 0,2 Q Virgil Hodge Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 17 Nov 83  
4 23.29 0,2 Q Aleksandra Fedoriva-Shpayer Russia RUS 13 Sep 88  
5 23.50 0,2 Q Inna Eftimova Bulgaria BUL 19 Jun 88  
6 24.31 0,2   Kia Davis Liberia LBR 23 May 76  
7 24.46 0,2   Kristen Nieuwendam Suriname SUR 26 Aug 91 NR NJR NYR
200 m Women     Heat 2 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.71 -0,4 Q Muna Lee United States USA 30 Oct 81  
2 22.72 -0,4 Q Muriel Hurtis France FRA 25 Mar 79  
3 22.76 -0,4 Q Cydonie Mothersill Cayman Islands CAY 19 Mar 78  
4 22.98 -0,4 Q Yuliya Chermoshanskaya Russia RUS 6 Jan 86  
5 23.13 -0,4 Q Ivet Lalova-Collio Bulgaria BUL 18 May 84  
6 24.05 -0,4   Mariely Sánchez Dominican Republic DOM 30 Dec 88  
7 24.07 -0,4   Carol Rodriguez Puerto Rico PUR 16 Dec 85  
200 m Women     Heat 3 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 23.07 -1,7 Q Marshevet Hooker United States USA 25 Sep 84  
2 23.22 -1,7 Q Debbie Ferguson McKenzie Bahamas BAH 16 Jan 76  
3 23.31 -1,7 Q Damola Osayomi Nigeria NGR 26 Jun 86  
4 23.58 -1,7 Q Eleni Artymata Cyprus CYP 16 May 86  
5 23.62 -1,7   Sabina Veit Slovenia SLO 2 Dec 85  
6 23.72 -1,7   Gloria Kemasuode Nigeria NGR 30 Dec 79  
7 23.83 -1,7   Meritzer Williams Saint Kitts and Nevis SKN 1 Jan 89  
8 24.07 -1,7   Fabienne Féraez Benin BEN 6 Aug 76  
200 m Women     Heat 4 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.81 -1 Q Rakia Al-Gasara Bahrain BRN 6 Sep 82  
2 22.95 -1 Q Emily Freeman Great Britain GBR 24 Nov 80  
3 23.03 -1 Q Kerron Stewart Jamaica JAM 16 Apr 84  
4 23.24 -1 Q Ionela Tîrlea Romania ROU 9 Feb 76  
5 23.33 -1 Q Darlenis Obregón Colombia COL 21 Feb 86  
6 23.44 -1 Q Guzel Khubbieva Uzbekistan UZB 2 May 76  
7 23.62 -1   Jade Bailey Barbados BAR 10 Jun 83  
8 24.37 -1   Lai Lai Win Myanmar MYA 9 Feb 77  
200 m Women     Heat 5 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 23.04 -0,1 Q Veronica Campbell-Brown Jamaica JAM 15 May 82  
2 23.06 -0,1 Q Kadiatou Camara Mali MLI 4 May 81  
3 23.21 -0,1 Q Natalya Rusakova Russia RUS 12 Dec 80  
4 23.33 -0,1 Q Sheniqua Ferguson Bahamas BAH 24 Nov 89  
5 23.40 -0,1 Q Adrienne Power Canada CAN 11 Dec 81  
6 23.44 -0,1 Q Vincenza Calì Italy ITA 15 Oct 83  
7 23.67 -0,1   Isabel le Roux South Africa RSA 23 Jan 87  
8 32.16 -0,1   Samia Yusuf Omar Somalia SOM 25 Mar 91  
200 m Women     Heat 6 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark Wind   Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 22.91 -0,4 Q Nataliya Pyhyda Ukraine UKR 30 Jan 81  
2 22.94 -0,4 Q Sherone Simpson Jamaica JAM 12 Aug 84  
3 23.09 -0,4 Q Roxana Díaz Cuba CUB 16 May 81  
4 23.12 -0,4 Q Laverne Jones-Ferrette United States Virgin Islands ISV 16 Sep 81  
5 23.43 -0,4 Q Evelyn dos Santos Brazil BRA 11 Apr 85  
6 23.45 -0,4 Q Allison George Grenada GRN 3 Jan 88  
7 23.59 -0,4   Marta Jeschke Poland POL 2 Jun 86  
8 25.32 -0,4   Greta Taslakian Lebanon LIB 16 Aug 85  

 

 

 

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