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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Women's Javelin Throw

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top 12 and ties and all those reaching 61.50 metres advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 19, 2008  
Date Finished: August 21, 2008  
(Competitors: 54; Countries: 39; Finalists: 12)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg

Špotáková, the World Champion and favourite, had led the qualifiers with 67.69. Her competitive abilities were tested early in the final when Abakumova produced a Russian record of 69.32. Špotáková immediately responded with an excellent 69.22. Obergföll and Sayers both produced their best throws in round one, and the bronze medal was settled in favour of the German.
Abakumova backed up her opening throw with 69.04 in the second round, and in round 4 moved to number three on the all-time list with a European record of 70.78. No-one had ever thrown that far without winning, but Špotáková, who had begun her international career eight years earlier as a junior heptathlete, showed great poise and concentration in producing her own national record of 71.42 in the final round to win the best throwing competition of the 2008 Olympics.

       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Barbora Špotáková (CZE) came in as the 2007 World Champion and with the best record of the year, and then led the qualifying with 67.69 (222-5). In the final Mariya Abakumova (RUS) opened with 69.32 (227-5), a national record and PR which made her the fourth-longest thrower ever. Špotáková answered with 69.22 (227-11), also a PR and national record, but settled into second place and they held those positions thru the first three rounds. In round four Abakumova hammered the spear out to 70.78 (232-3), making her the second-longest performer in history. But Špotáková came thru in the final round with 71.42 (234-4), less than a foot short of the world record, held by Cuba’s Osleidys Menéndez, who placed fifth with only one valid throw. The bronze medal went to Germany’s Christina Obergföll, silver medalist at the 2007 Worlds, who had opened with 66.13 (216-11) but then struggled with four fouls.
 

Records

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows:

World record  Osleidys Menéndez (CUB) 71.70 Helsinki, Finland 14 August 2005
Olympic record  Osleidys Menéndez (CUB) 71.53 Athens, Greece 27 August 2004

No new world or Olympic records were set for this event.

 
        Results        

The women's javelin throw at the 2008 Summer Olympics took place on 19–21 August at the Beijing National Stadium.

The qualifying standards were 60.50 m (A standard) and 56.00 m (B standard).

Mariya Abakumova held the lead from her first throw, with Barbora Špotáková the only other competitor within 3 metres. Abakumova improved to 70.78 on her fourth throw. Then on her final throw, Špotáková put it out to 71.42 to take the gold.

Women' Javelin Throw - FINAL

 

Czech World champion Barbora Spotakova, with a massive last round throw of 71.42m swept away a briefly set European record by Russia’s 2005 European Junior champion Maria Abakumova (fourth round, 70.78), to claim the Olympic title.

This was the greatest competition in terms of quality at a major championship since the introduction of the new specification spear at the turn of the century. Topped by the fourth longest throw of all-time, the list of the world’s 70m javelin throwers was doubled this evening.

Two 70m throws in the same competition have only been seen once with the current javelin. That occurred at the 2005 World Championships final in Helsinki when Cuba’s Osleidys Menendez set the World record of 71.70 and a then new comer Christina Obergföll of Germany surprisingly countered with a 70.03 European record.

The German was to improve her record to 70.20 winning the European Cup in Munich in 2007, and Menendez has had two other 70m+ throws in her career. These five throws were until this evening the sum of the world’s cash of all-time 70m performances.

Tonight Menendez and Obergföll were but bit-part players in an extraordinary 70m duel. We witnessed the arrival of a prodigious talent on the world stage just as promising as Obergföll had been in Helsinki, and the cementing of the pre-eminent reputation of the reigning World champion.

Obergföll has a growing reputation for under performing in major championships; fourth in 2006 Europeans, silver in 2007 Worlds, and now bronze in Beijing. Her third place was secured with her opening attempt of 66.13. The European record holder coming into this final, Obergföll, 26, was the first of the major players to perform, however, her following five throws all stalled thanks to too high a trajectory.

Immediately following the German in the throwing order was the 22-year-old Russian Abakumova who at the start of this year had a personal best of 64.28. Her release was a revelation, 69.32m, a national record which improved her 67.25m which she established just prior to these Games in Irkutsk on 2 August.

When five throwers later Britain’s Goldie Sayers produced a national record of 65.75 (ultimately fifth place), and with the next effort of the first round Spotakova launched her first spear to 69.22, an improvement by seven centimetres of her own Czech record, we guessed we were about to experience a very special competition.

Abakumova again encroached into what previously had been unknown territory to her before this evening. Her second round 69.08 would have been good enough for 10th on the all-time list prior to the start of this final.

Rain was now descending heavily on the competition and the runway was mopped in an very improvised manner, as officials used bath towels to dry up the approach surface.

Besides the Russian’s mark, the efforts of the other eleven finalists certainly seemed to be subdued by the weather in the second and third rounds, with nothing of significance being recorded.

The weather conditions however were not to dampen Abakumova’s quick ascent up the all-time list, as on her fourth attempt she improved her national mark again to 70.78, which bettered Obergföll’s continental mark by 58cm.

The rain was still heavy and it looked increasingly like no one would have any answer to the young Russian phenomenon.

But in the ever smiling face of the Czech World champion there was the sense that at least one athlete believed the gold medal was not decided. Since her opening gambit Spotakova had produced, 67.04, foul, 64.92 and then in the fifth another foul. Like Obergföll her spear was stalling high and landing in the early 60m region on each occasion, and then intentionally foot fouled by the disappointed thrower.

Spotakova, has a exaggerated high stepping approach, a firm controlled base from which she mounts her efforts, and on her final throw the penultimate of the competition, technique and power were joined and a 71.42 European record flew from the 27-year-old’s grip.

The pressure was now on Russia’s international newcomer who with the last throw of the night had to find an immediate response. To Abakumova’s credit she managed 67.58! As we wrote in our preview more than a week ago, “in their 2005 European Junior champion, Mariya Abakumova, Russia has found a throwing gem.”

“I don’t know how I did it,” said Spotakova. “I can tell you honestly. I don’t know how I did it.”

“It’s a very special day for the Czech Republic. It’s the 40th anniversary of the Russian invasion in 1968.”

“I usually win with my first throw. I’ve never won with my last attempt. This is the first time.”

So the medals went to the Czech Republic, Russia, and Germany.

Notably Germany packed the top-eight, with European champion Steffi Nerius in fourth (65.29) and Katharina Molitor eighth (59.64). Defending champion Menendez was a shadow of her former self with 63.35 (6th) and Pole Barbara Medejczyk was seventh with 62.02.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

With dramatic last round effort, Spotakova sets European record to spear Olympic gold

 

Czech World champion Barbora Spotakova, with a massive last round throw of 71.42m swept away a briefly set European record by Russia’s 2005 European Junior champion Maria Abakumova (fourth round, 70.78), to claim the Olympic title.

This was the greatest competition in terms of quality at a major championship since the introduction of the new specification spear at the turn of the century. Topped by the fourth longest throw of all-time, the list of the world’s 70m javelin throwers was doubled this evening.

Two 70m throws in the same competition have only been seen once with the current javelin. That occurred at the 2005 World Championships final in Helsinki when Cuba’s Osleidys Menendez set the World record of 71.70 and a then new comer Christina Obergföll of Germany surprisingly countered with a 70.03 European record.

The German was to improve her record to 70.20 winning the European Cup in Munich in 2007, and Menendez has had two other 70m+ throws in her career. These five throws were until this evening the sum of the world’s cash of all-time 70m performances.

Tonight Menendez and Obergföll were but bit-part players in an extraordinary 70m duel. We witnessed the arrival of a prodigious talent on the world stage just as promising as Obergföll had been in Helsinki, and the cementing of the pre-eminent reputation of the reigning World champion.

Obergföll has a growing reputation for under performing in major championships; fourth in 2006 Europeans, silver in 2007 Worlds, and now bronze in Beijing. Her third place was secured with her opening attempt of 66.13. The European record holder coming into this final, Obergföll, 26, was the first of the major players to perform, however, her following five throws all stalled thanks to too high a trajectory.

Immediately following the German in the throwing order was the 22-year-old Russian Abakumova who at the start of this year had a personal best of 64.28. Her release was a revelation, 69.32m, a national record which improved her 67.25m which she established just prior to these Games in Irkutsk on 2 August.

When five throwers later Britain’s Goldie Sayers produced a national record of 65.75 (ultimately fifth place), and with the next effort of the first round Spotakova launched her first spear to 69.22, an improvement by seven centimetres of her own Czech record, we guessed we were about to experience a very special competition.

Abakumova again encroached into what previously had been unknown territory to her before this evening. Her second round 69.08 would have been good enough for 10th on the all-time list prior to the start of this final.

Rain was now descending heavily on the competition and the runway was mopped in an very improvised manner, as officials used bath towels to dry up the approach surface.

Besides the Russian’s mark, the efforts of the other eleven finalists certainly seemed to be subdued by the weather in the second and third rounds, with nothing of significance being recorded.

The weather conditions however were not to dampen Abakumova’s quick ascent up the all-time list, as on her fourth attempt she improved her national mark again to 70.78, which bettered Obergföll’s continental mark by 58cm.

The rain was still heavy and it looked increasingly like no one would have any answer to the young Russian phenomenon.

But in the ever smiling face of the Czech World champion there was the sense that at least one athlete believed the gold medal was not decided. Since her opening gambit Spotakova had produced, 67.04, foul, 64.92 and then in the fifth another foul. Like Obergföll her spear was stalling high and landing in the early 60m region on each occasion, and then intentionally foot fouled by the disappointed thrower.

Spotakova, has a exaggerated high stepping approach, a firm controlled base from which she mounts her efforts, and on her final throw the penultimate of the competition, technique and power were joined and a 71.42 European record flew from the 27-year-old’s grip.

The pressure was now on Russia’s international newcomer who with the last throw of the night had to find an immediate response. To Abakumova’s credit she managed 67.58! As we wrote in our preview more than a week ago, “in their 2005 European Junior champion, Mariya Abakumova, Russia has found a throwing gem.”

“I don’t know how I did it,” said Spotakova. “I can tell you honestly. I don’t know how I did it.”

“It’s a very special day for the Czech Republic. It’s the 40th anniversary of the Russian invasion in 1968.”

“I usually win with my first throw. I’ve never won with my last attempt. This is the first time.”

So the medals went to the Czech Republic, Russia, and Germany.

Notably Germany packed the top-eight, with European champion Steffi Nerius in fourth (65.29) and Katharina Molitor eighth (59.64). Defending champion Menendez was a shadow of her former self with 63.35 (6th) and Pole Barbara Medejczyk was seventh with 62.02.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Javelin Throw Women     Final 21 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 71.42     Barbora Špotáková Czech Republic CZE 30 Jun 81 AR
2 70.78     Mariya Abakumova Russia RUS 15 Jan 86 AUR AR
3 66.13     Christina Obergföll Germany GER 22 Aug 81  
4 65.75     Goldie Sayers Great Britain GBR 16 Jul 82 NR
5 65.29     Steffi Nerius Germany GER 1 Jul 72  
6 63.35     Osleidis Menéndez Cuba CUB 14 Nov 79  
7 62.02     Barbara Madejczyk Poland POL 30 Sep 76  
8 59.64     Katharina Molitor Germany GER 8 Nov 83  
9 58.13     Mercedes Chilla Spain ESP 19 Jan 80  
10 56.14     Zhang Li China CHN 17 Jan 89  
11 53.38     Sinta Ozoliņa-Kovale Latvia LAT 26 Feb 88  
12 53.04     Felicia Tilea Romania ROU 29 Sep 67  

Women's Javelin Throw qualification

 

Thursday’s final (21 Aug) looks set to be a battle for gold between Czech World champion Barbora Spotakova and Germany’s European record holder Christina Obergföll. These two women, are the fourth (Spotakova) and second furthest (Obergföll) throwers of all-time, and dominated their respective pools with 67.69m and 67.52 automatic qualifications obtained on their first and only releases.

With PBs of 69.15 (2008) and 70.20 (2007) respectively the 27-year-old Czech, and one year younger German are evenly matched. Obergföll, twice a World silver medallist has a best this year of 67.72.

Both looked smooth and relaxed in  their approach and release, a class apart form the rest of the other 52, yes, 52 athletes, who along with our two protagonists were divided into two qualification pools of 27 throwers.

With 61.50m the automatic mark to get to the final, Spotakova topped Group A, and Obergföll, Group B, with a total of eight women managing that distance or better.

It is very likely we will be treated to a 70m competition when they rejoin in battle on Thursday.

Unless World record holder and defending Olympic champion Osleidys Menendez of Cuba, who has had a lot of injury trouble in the last couple of seasons, can suddenly recapture top form – she qualified for the final as one the four best losers with 60.51 – then the likelihood of the gold medal going elsewhere is remote.

Hey, but we said that before the men’s Shot Put last Friday (15), and look what happened to the favourites then!

If there is to be a surprise could it come from Russia’s 2005 European Junior champion, Mariya Abakumova? Now 22-years-old, Abakumova on 2 August in Irkutsk, at one of the Russian Olympic team’s competitions in preparation for Beijing, threw a national record of 67.25m. Today she was the fourth best qualifier with 63.48.

The athlete immediately ahead of the Russian in qualification is the most experienced and medalled athlete still competing in the event. Germany’s Steffi Nerius, now 36, has had numerous major championship podiums but has only once reached the top step, when she took the European title in 2006 ahead of among others, Spotakova (silver) and Obergföll (4th). The 2004 Olympic silver and 2007 World bronze medallist, Nerius always remains a threat as she is a proven competitor, and threw 63.94 today behind the Czech.

Also coming from Group A were the automatic qualifiers, Mercedes Chilla of Spain (61.81) and China’s 2005 19-year-old Li Zhang  (61.77), the 2005 World Youth champion, while the remaining automatics from Group B were Britain’s Goldie Sayers (62.99) and Pole Barbara Madejczyk (62.81).

Making up the final numbers to 12, as well as Menendez who we have already mentioned, there was Sinta Ozolina whose 60.13m was a Latvian record, Germany’s Katherina Molitor who qualified with the penultimate throw of the competition (60.92), and Romania’s Felicea Moldovan-Tilea (60.81).

Notably missing the cut was Athens 2004 sixth placer Lavern Eve of the Bahamas, who at 43 is taking part in her fifth Olympics. Also not progressing were African record holder Justine Robbeson and US record holder Kim Kreiner, Greek Sávva Líka who was fifth in Osaka, and many time championship medallist MIkaela Ingberg of Finland.

Chris Turner for the IAAF

Javelin Throw Women     Qualification 19 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 67.69   Q Barbora Špotáková Czech Republic CZE 30 Jun 81  
2 67.52   Q Christina Obergföll Germany GER 22 Aug 81  
3 63.94   Q Steffi Nerius Germany GER 1 Jul 72  
4 63.48   Q Mariya Abakumova Russia RUS 15 Jan 86  
5 62.99   Q Goldie Sayers Great Britain GBR 16 Jul 82  
6 62.81   Q Barbara Madejczyk Poland POL 30 Sep 76  
7 61.81   Q Mercedes Chilla Spain ESP 19 Jan 80  
8 61.77   Q Zhang Li China CHN 17 Jan 89  
9 60.92   Q Katharina Molitor Germany GER 8 Nov 83  
10 60.81   Q Felicia Tilea Romania ROU 29 Sep 67  
11 60.51   Q Osleidis Menéndez Cuba CUB 14 Nov 79  
12 60.13   Q Sinta Ozoliņa-Kovale Latvia LAT 26 Feb 88 NR
13 59.63     Justine Robbeson South Africa RSA 15 May 85  
14 59.28     Urszula Piwnicka Poland POL 6 Dec 83  
15 59.11     Sávva Líka Greece GRE 27 Jun 70  
16 59.05     Vera Rebrik Ukraine UKR 25 Feb 89  
17 58.82     Mikaela Ingberg Finland FIN 29 Jul 74  
18 58.42     Chang Chunfeng China CHN 4 May 88  
19 58.06     Yanet Cruz Cuba CUB 8 Feb 88  
20 57.36     Lavern Eve Bahamas BAH 16 Jun 65  
21 57.25     Jarmila Jurkovičová Czech Republic CZE 9 Feb 81  
22 57.15     Nikolett Szabó Hungary HUN 3 Mar 80  
23 57.11     Natallia Shymchuk Belarus BLR 1 Oct 81  
24 57.06     Sílvia Cruz Portugal POR 29 Dec 80  
25 57.05     Olha Ivankova Ukraine UKR 7 Jan 73  
26 56.94     Moonika Aava Estonia EST 17 Jun 79  
27 56.53     Alessandra Resende Brazil BRA 5 Mar 75  
28 56.35     Buoban Phamang Thailand THA 27 Dec 86  
29 56.32     Lindy Leveau-Agricole Seychelles SEY 14 Nov 79  
30 56.27     Erma-Gene Evans Saint Lucia LCA 25 Jan 84  
31 56.10     Maryna Novik Belarus BLR 19 Jan 84  
32 55.66     Inga Stasiulionytė Lithuania LTU 29 Jun 81  
33 55.58     Sunette Viljoen South Africa RSA 6 Jan 83  
34 55.51     Olivia McKoy Jamaica JAM 1 Dec 73  
35 55.50     Tetyana Lyahovych Ukraine UKR 20 May 79  
36 55.31     Anastasiya Svechnikova Uzbekistan UZB 20 Sep 92  
37 55.30     Martina Ratej Slovenia SLO 2 Nov 81  
38 55.13     Kim Kreiner United States USA 26 Jul 77  
39 54.71     Zuleima Araméndiz Colombia COL 23 Sep 75  
40 54.56     Monica Stoian Romania ROU 25 Aug 82  
41 54.39     Kara Winger United States USA 10 Apr 86  
42 54.32     Song Dan China CHN 5 Jul 90  
43 54.28     Nadeeka Lakmali Sri Lanka SRI 18 Sep 81  
44 53.95     Christina Scherwin Denmark DEN 11 Jul 76  
45 53.24     Alexandra Tsisiou Cyprus CYP 2 Jul 81  
46 53.13     Kim Kyung-Ae South Korea KOR 5 Mar 88  
47 51.67     Mariya Yakovenko Russia RUS 6 Jan 82  
48 50.51     María González Venezuela VEN 28 Mar 82  
49 49.26     Serafina Akeli Samoa SAM 7 Dec 78  
50 48.59     Ásdís Hjálmsdóttir Iceland ISL 28 Oct 85  
51 45.34     Leryn Franco Paraguay PAR 1 Mar 82  
52 40.15     Rumyana Karapetrova Bulgaria BUL 7 Feb 82  
  NM     Tatjana Jelača Serbia SRB 10 Aug 90  
  NM     Zahra Bani Italy ITA 31 Dec 79  
 
Detailed View
 

Qualifying round

Qualification: 61.50 (Q) or at least 12 best performers (q) advance to the final.

Rank Group Athlete Nationality #1 #2 #3 Result Notes[5]
1 A Barbora Špotáková Czech Republic 67.69     67.69 Q
2 B Christina Obergföll Germany 67.52     67.52 Q
3 A Steffi Nerius Germany 59.15 59.74 63.94 63.94 Q
4 A Mariya Abakumova Russia 61.23 63.48   63.48 Q
5 B Goldie Sayers Great Britain 60.79 62.99   62.99 Q
6 B Barbara Madejczyk Poland 62.81     62.81 Q, SB
7 A Mercedes Chilla Spain 56.98 61.81   61.81 Q, SB
8 A Zhang Li China 58.30 61.77   61.77 Q
9 B Katharina Molitor Germany 55.65 53.50 60.92 60.92 q
10 B Felicea Moldovan-Tilea Romania 53.25 55.89 60.81 60.81 q
11 A Osleidys Menéndez Cuba 60.51 x 60.41 60.51 q
12 A Sinta Ozoliņa Latvia 60.13 x 52.62 60.13 q, NR
13 B Justine Robbeson South Africa 56.75 54.26 59.63 59.63  
14 A Urszula Piwnicka Poland 51.33 52.99 59.28 59.28  
15 A Savva Lika Greece 56.44 58.59 59.11 59.11  
16 A Vira Rebryk Ukraine 55.77 57.12 59.05 59.05  
17 B Mikaela Ingberg Finland 55.71 58.82 58.36 58.82  
18 A Chang Chunfeng China 58.42 x x 58.42  
19 B Yanet Cruz Cuba 58.06 57.15 57.03 58.06  
20 B Lavern Eve Bahamas 55.22 57.36 55.15 57.36  
21 B Jarmila Klimešová Czech Republic 52.18 57.25 x 57.25  
22 A Nikolett Szabó Hungary 56.98 57.15 x 57.15  
23 A Natallia Shymchuk Belarus 55.56 57.11 x 57.11  
24 A Sílvia Cruz Portugal 54.65 57.06 x 57.06  
25 B Olha Ivankova Ukraine 55.63 51.98 57.05 57.05  
26 B Moonika Aava Estonia x 56.94 x 56.94  
27 A Alessandra Resende Brazil 54.05 56.53 54.32 56.53  
28 B Buoban Pamang Thailand 53.69 x 56.35 56.35 SB
29 B Lindy Leveau-Agricole Seychelles 56.32 55.90 50.74 56.32 SB
30 B Erma-Gene Evans Saint Lucia 46.79 54.60 56.27 56.27  
31 B Maryna Novik Belarus 56.10 x 53.48 56.10  
32 A Inga Stasiulionyte Lithuania 55.66 x 55.34 55.66  
33 A Sunette Viljoen South Africa 53.14 55.58 53.82 55.58  
34 B Olivia McKoy Jamaica 55.51 x 53.85 55.51  
35 B Tetyana Lyakhovych Ukraine 55.50 x 53.59 55.50  
36 A Anastasiya Svechnikova Uzbekistan 55.31 x 48.71 55.31  
37 A Martina Ratej Slovenia 55.30 51.56 53.24 55.30  
38 B Kim Kreiner United States 55.13 53.81 53.48 55.13  
39 A Zuleima Aramendiz Colombia 51.30 54.71 x 54.71  
40 A Monica Stoian Romania x 54.56 x 54.56  
41 A Kara Patterson United States 54.00 50.35 54.39 54.39  
42 B Song Dan China 53.11 54.32 x 54.32  
43 A Nadeeka Lakmali Sri Lanka x 53.44 54.28 54.28  
44 A Christina Scherwin Denmark 53.95 x x 53.95 SB
45 B Alexandra Nasta-Tsisiou Cyprus 53.24 x 47.18 53.24  
46 A Kim Kyung-Ae South Korea 51.46 48.00 53.13 53.13  
47 B Mariya Yakovenko Russia 47.90 51.67 50.49 51.67  
48 A María González Venezuela 48.37 50.51 42.32 50.51  
49 B Serafina Akeli Samoa 47.83 42.78 49.26 49.26  
50 B Ásdís Hjálmsdóttir Iceland x x 48.59 48.59  
51 B Leryn Franco Paraguay 45.34 x 43.77 45.34  
52 B Rumyana Karapetrova Bulgaria 40.15 - - 40.15  
  A Zahra Bani Italy x x x NM  
  B Tatjana Jelaca Serbia x x x NM  
 

Final

Rank Athlete Nationality 1 2 3 4 5 6 Result Notes
1st Barbora Špotáková Czech Republic 69.22 67.04 x 64.92 x 71.42 71.42 AR
2nd Mariya Abakumova Russia 69.32 69.08 x 70.78 x 67.52 70.78 NR
3rd Christina Obergföll Germany 66.13 x 63.34 x x x 66.13  
4 Goldie Sayers Great Britain 65.75 59.40 62.92 59.72 65.03 56.83 65.75 NR
5 Steffi Nerius Germany 64.05 62.25 59.97 x x 65.29 65.29  
6 Osleidys Menéndez Cuba 63.35 x x x x x 63.35  
7 Barbara Madejczyk Poland 58.74 59.16 58.67 x 58.21 62.02 62.02  
8 Katharina Molitor Germany 53.19 57.37 59.64 58.81 56.72 57.00 59.64  
 
9 Mercedes Chilla Spain x 57.94 58.13   58.13  
10 Zhang Li China 54.69 x 56.14   56.14  
11 Sinta Ozoliņa Latvia 50.67 53.38 52.23   53.38  
12 Felicia Tilea-Moldovan Romania 53.04 x 52.80   53.04

 

 

 

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