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2008 Olympic Games Beijing - Women's Pole vault

 

 

Host City: Beijing, China Format: Top 12 and ties and all those clearing 4.60 metres advanced to the final.
Date Started: August 16, 2008  
Date Finished: August 18, 2008  
(Competitors: 36; Countries: 24; Finalists: 12)  
    Venue(s): Beijing National Stadium, Beijing
Overview by IAAF    2008_olympic_stadium.jpg
Having improved her 2005 world record of 5.01 twice during July up to 5.04, Isinbaeva was an even more prohibitive favourite than she had been four years earlier. The advancing standards in the event were evidenced by the fact that all 12 finalists cleared at least 4.50 in the qualifying round. Just nine women had managed that height across the previous two games. With the bar at 4.65, there were still 11 vaulters left in the competition. Isinbaeva waited until 4.70 to take her first vault, and her firsttime success ensured fourth place at worst. At 4.75, Feofanova took the lead with a first-time clearance, ahead of the successful second jumps of Stuczynski and Golubchikova. After Stuczynski made 4.80 and the other Russians were eliminated, it was a duel between the American and Isinbaeva, who then went over 4.85. Passing that height, Stuczynski finally bowed out at 4.90, and Isinbaeva broke her own Olympic record with 4.95 at the final attempt. Then at 9:22, just over two hours into the competition, Isinbaeva took her final jump at 5.05. To the delight of the crowd and herself, she flew over the bar cleanly to set her 14th world record outdoors (and 25th overall). In doing so Isinbaeva became the first athlete to win consecutive individual gold medals with world records, though Frank Wykoff did the same thing three times in the sprint relay.
       
Summary by Sports-reference.com      
Yelena Isinbayeva was an overwhelming favorite in the women’s pole vault and she did not disappoint. The Russian defending champion and 2005 and 2007 World Champion had also set the last 11 world records, starting in 2004, with her last two coming earlier in 2008. American Jenn Stuczynski was the second choice but Isinbayeva would likely have to no height for her to win. Stuczynski did not think so, stating after the Olympics Trials, “I hope we do some damage and, you know, kick some Russian butt.” Isi heard the comment and it only served to rev her up. Isinbayeva opened with a first-vault clearance at 4.70 (15-5). Stuczynski led after clearing 4.80 (15-9), and was the only other vaulter left, as Is passed to 4.85 (15-11). The two then played a game of cat-and-mouse passing, as Stuczynski passed that height. She jumped at 4.90 (16-0¾), at which the Russian passed, but went out after three misses. Isinbayeva now had the gold medal but she was not done. She cleared 4.95 (16-2¾) on her third try and then had the bar moved to the world record height of 5.05 (16-6¾). She needed three attempts but got over the bar for her 12th outdoor world record.
 
 
        Results        
 

Women's Pole Vault - FINAL

 

For the second straight Olympic Games, Yelena Isinbayeva set a new World record in the Pole Vault. Sending the capacity crowd at National Stadium into a frenzy, the Russian defended her title with a leap of 5.05m, adding a centimetre to her own 5.04m record set last month at the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco.

“I was trying to do my best for the crowd,” said the 26-year-old after setting her 24th world mark. “I felt that I could not go without a world record because of the support the crowd gave me.”

Success came on her third attempt, although her second was reasonably close as well.

The majority of the half dozen other competitors who remained in the competition were already struggling when Isinbayeva opened at 4.70m, a massive clearance by some 30cm that clearly illustrated that a World record would be a possibility.

She had already clinched the gold with her second jump, a clean effort at 4.85m. Next came an assault on her four-year-old Olympic record of 4.91m, which she managed on her third try at 4.95m.

“I remembered my feelings from Athens and I wanted to feel that again.”

As has become the norm, Isinbayeva whiled away her time lying on the grass near the runway, a cap and towel covering her face, seemingly oblivious to the dramatic competition unfolding in the background. Here at Olympic Stadium, she even broke that routine to stand for four national anthems that accompanied the awards ceremonies for the men’s 10,000m, the women’s Discus Throw, men’s 3000m steeplechase, and women’s 800m.

Isinabayeva is now a dozen records shy of overtaking men’s Pole Vault legend World record haul of 35, and she reiterated that she’ll keeping going until she gets there.

“Yes, I will do it. I have just 12 more to go. Life would be boring without records to break.”

According to script, American record holder Jenn Stuczynski took the silver, topping out at 4.80m. Opening at 4.55m, she also cleared 4.70m on her first try, needed a second at 4.75m before going over 4.80m on her first to clinch the silver. At 4.90m, her first go was reasonably close, her second less so.

Isinbayeva was asked about the American’s comments earlier in the summer that she would beat her at the Olympic Games.

“You saw tonight what happened,” Isinbayeva said. “Sometimes people talk too much.”

4.75m was enough for silver four years ago; here it was needed to strike bronze. Athens silver medallist Svetlana Feofanova left herself in medal contention with a first attempt success while her Russian teammate Yuliya Golubchikova needed a pair of tries before going clear, adding two centimetres to her personal best. 4.80m though was well beyond the reach of each.

Monika Pyrek, who looked good in the early going, bowed out at that height, after a pair of misses and a run-through to eliminate herself from the medal chase.

Pre-meet medal favourite Fabiana Murer of Brazil, who upped her career best to 4.80m this summer, made an early exit, though the blame wasn’t apparently her own. After sailing over her 4.45m opener, she realized that the pole she needed for her next height, 4.55m, was missing. After a delay of several minutes, her search went in vain and she chose to skip the height, expending considerable energy in the process.

Also making an unexpected early departure was defending bronze medallist Anna Rogowska, who after clearing her opening 4.45m, found 4.55m too much to handle.

Bob Ramsak for the IAAF

 

Isinbayeva Again! 5.05m World Pole Vault record in Beijing

 

BeijingFor the second straight Olympic Games, Yelena Isinbayeva set a new World record in the Pole Vault. Sending the capacity crowd at National Stadium into a frenzy, the Russian defended her title with a leap of 5.05m, adding a centimetre to her own 5.04m record set last month at the Herculis Super Grand Prix in Monaco.

“I was trying to do my best for the crowd,” said the 26-year-old after setting her 24th world mark. “I felt that I could not go without a world record because of the support the crowd gave me.”

Success came on her third attempt, although her second was reasonably close as well.

The majority of the half dozen other competitors who remained in the competition were already struggling when Isinbayeva opened at 4.70m, a massive clearance by some 30cm that clearly illustrated that a World record would be a possibility.

She had already clinched the gold with her second jump, a clean effort at 4.85m. Next came an assault on her four-year-old Olympic record of 4.91m, which she managed on her third try at 4.95m.

“I remembered my feelings from Athens and I wanted to feel that again.”

As has become the norm, Isinbayeva whiled away her time lying on the grass near the runway, a cap and towel covering her face, seemingly oblivious to the dramatic competition unfolding in the background. Here at Olympic Stadium, she even broke that routine to stand for four national anthems that accompanied the awards ceremonies for the men’s 10,000m, the women’s Discus Throw, men’s 3000m steeplechase, and women’s 800m.

Isinabayeva is now a dozen records shy of overtaking men’s Pole Vault legend World record haul of 35, and she reiterated that she’ll keeping going until she gets there.

“Yes, I will do it. I have just 12 more to go. Life would be boring without records to break.”

According to script, American record holder Jenn Stuczynski took the silver, topping out at 4.80m. Opening at 4.55m, she also cleared 4.70m on her first try, needed a second at 4.75m before going over 4.80m on her first to clinch the silver. At 4.90m, her first go was reasonably close, her second less so.

Isinbayeva was asked about the American’s comments earlier in the summer that she would beat her at the Olympic Games.

“You saw tonight what happened,” Isinbayeva said. “Sometimes people talk too much.”

4.75m was enough for silver four years ago; here it was needed to strike bronze. Athens silver medallist Svetlana Feofanova left herself in medal contention with a first attempt success while her Russian teammate Yuliya Golubchikova needed a pair of tries before going clear, adding two centimetres to her personal best. 4.80m though was well beyond the reach of each.

Monika Pyrek, who looked good in the early going, bowed out at that height, after a pair of misses and a run-through to eliminate herself from the medal chase.

Pre-meet medal favourite Fabiana Murer of Brazil, who upped her career best to 4.80m this summer, made an early exit, though the blame wasn’t apparently her own. After sailing over her 4.45m opener, she realized that the pole she needed for her next height, 4.55m, was missing. After a delay of several minutes, her search went in vain and she chose to skip the height, expending considerable energy in the process.

Also making an unexpected early departure was defending bronze medallist Anna Rogowska, who after clearing her opening 4.45m, found 4.55m too much to handle.

Bob Ramsak for the IAAF

Isinbayeva puts on a show!

 

Ask any theatre director what actors do when left to their own devices. They end up downstage centre, that’s to say, right in the middle of the spotlight. Cue Yelena Isinibayeva. On her own admission, after bringing the house down yet again, clearing 5.05 metres to win her second Olympic gold and set her 24th World record, she loves nothing more than having the stage to herself.

“I love it so much, I feel like an actress. They (the crowd) are there just for me. They want a World record, so at least, I will try to do my best. And I was confident, I really wanted to make all the people happy.”

“I wasn’t afraid of this height, sometimes in different stadia, I feel 4.50 is like six metres, but tonight, this felt low. Now I feel so happy that I have 24 World records.”

This statement raised the inevitable question, of when she would get up to 36 World records, beating the 35 of that guy from the Ukraine, now masquerading as IAAF Senior Vice President.

She almost looked shocked, “No, I will never bear Sergey (Bubka). He was the best in the world. But I will try to do my best. I’m going to do another twelve.”

Now she knows her position

Amid the joy, laughter and exuberance, there was one thing which still rankled, namely the comments of Jen Stuczcinski of the US, who had done a bit of trash talking before the Games. The American incidentally was still at dope testing after taking the silver with 4.80 metres, so didn’t attend the press conference, which would have been interesting.

Isinbayeva was still smiling, which appears to be her default mode, but she said, “It made me angry. How is it possible she is talking to much like that. It made me want to prove who is better. It wasn’t nice, she must show respect, and know her position. Now she knows her position."

Senior lieutenant

Isinbayeva is of an unusual cultural mix. Her mother is Russian, but her father is a member of one of the Federation’s smallest ethnic groups, the Tabasarans, who number barely 100,000, and come from the Republic of Dagestan, which borders the Caspian Sea, at Russia’s south-west tip. She was born in Volgograd, formerly Stalingrad, site of the famous siege and battle which turned the fortunes on the Eastern front in the Second World War.

She graduated from the Volgograd State Academy of Physical Culture with a Batchelor’s degree, and, between training session is working for her master’s. She is still a member of the Russian Army team, and in 2005 was given the rank of senior lieutenant. That must come in handy when booking restaurants in her current home in Monaco.

It was already well past midnight by now, and someone asked if she resented having come to talk to the hacks, when she could have been relaxing at a restaurant, or at least having a well-earned beer or glass of wine.

“No, it’s a pleasure for me. I know you have been waiting two or three hours, but I want to feel professional. After all, you are my PR people in your different countries.”

It’s a good job the moderator called the conference to an end. She’d have kept us there all night. Just as she did the crowd outside. And we got just as good a performance. Someone called out a last question just as we were filing out, “What next?”

“See you in London 2012,” she laughed. What a trouper!

Pat Butcher for the IAAF

Pole vault Women     Final 18 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 5.05     Yelena Isinbayeva Russia RUS 3 Jun 82 WR
2 4.80     Jenn Suhr United States USA 5 Feb 82  
3 4.75     Svetlana Feofanova Russia RUS 16 Jul 80  
4 4.75     Yuliya Golubchikova Russia RUS 27 Mar 83  
5 4.70     Monika Pyrek Poland POL 11 Aug 80  
6 4.65     Carolin Hingst Germany GER 18 Sep 80  
7 4.65     Silke Spiegelburg Germany GER 17 Mar 86  
8 4.55     April Steiner Bennett United States USA 22 Apr 80  
9 4.55     Vanessa Boslak France FRA 11 Jun 82  
10 4.45     Fabiana Murer Brazil BRA 16 Mar 81  
10 4.45     Anna Rogowska Poland POL 21 May 81  
12 4.45     Gao Shuying China CHN 28 Oct 79  
Pole vault Women     Qualification 16 August      
                 
Rank Mark     Athlete Country NOC Birth Date Records
1 4.60   Q Yelena Isinbayeva Russia RUS 3 Jun 82  
2 4.50   Q Vanessa Boslak France FRA 11 Jun 82  
2 4.50   Q Gao Shuying China CHN 28 Oct 79  
2 4.50   Q Fabiana Murer Brazil BRA 16 Mar 81  
2 4.50   Q Jenn Suhr United States USA 5 Feb 82  
6 4.50   Q Svetlana Feofanova Russia RUS 16 Jul 80  
6 4.50   Q April Steiner Bennett United States USA 22 Apr 80  
8 4.50   Q Monika Pyrek Poland POL 11 Aug 80  
8 4.50   Q Anna Rogowska Poland POL 21 May 81  
10 4.50   Q Yuliya Golubchikova Russia RUS 27 Mar 83  
10 4.50   Q Carolin Hingst Germany GER 18 Sep 80  
12 4.50   Q Silke Spiegelburg Germany GER 17 Mar 86  
13 4.40     Naroa Agirre Spain ESP 15 May 79  
14 4.40     Anastasija Reiberger Germany GER 19 Sep 77  
15 4.40     Kate Dennison Great Britain GBR 7 May 84  
16 4.30     Alana Boyd Australia AUS 10 May 84  
16 4.30     Roslinda Samsu Malaysia MAS 9 Jun 82  
18 4.30     Kelsie Hendry Canada CAN 29 Jun 82  
19 4.30     Joanna Piwowarska Poland POL 4 Nov 83  
19 4.30     Afrodíti Skafída Greece GRE 20 Mar 82  
19 4.30     Sandra-Hélèna Homo Portugal POR 29 May 82  
22 4.30     Nicole Büchler Switzerland SUI 17 Dec 83  
23 4.15     Marion Buisson France FRA 19 Feb 88  
23 4.15     Thórey Edda Elísdóttir Iceland ISL 30 Jun 77  
25 4.15     Zhou Yang China CHN 16 May 88  
26 4.15     Krisztina Molnár Hungary HUN 8 Apr 76  
27 4.15     Nataliya Mazuryk Ukraine UKR 5 Mar 83  
27 4.15     Nikoléta Kiriakopoúlou Greece GRE 21 Mar 86  
27 4.15     Li Ling China CHN 6 Jul 89  
27 4.15     Yarisley Silva Cuba CUB 1 Jun 87  
31 4.15     Alejandra García Argentina ARG 13 Jun 73  
32 4.00     Leila Ben-Youssef Tunisia TUN 13 Nov 81  
32 4.00     Vanessa Vandy Finland FIN 14 May 89  
34 4.00     Anna Fitidou Cyprus CYP 22 Apr 77  
  NH     Kateřina Baďurová Czech Republic CZE 18 Dec 82  
  NH     Erica Bartolina United States USA 15 May 80  
 
Detailed View
 

Qualifying round

Qualifying performance: 4.60 (Q) or at least 12 best performers (q) advance to the final.

Rank Group Name Nationality 4.00 4.15 4.30 4.40 4.50 4.60 Result Notes[6]
1 A Yelena Isinbayeva Russia o 4.60 Q
2 B Vanessa Boslak France o o o o 4.50 q, =SB
2 A Gao Shuying China o o o 4.50 q
2 B Fabiana Murer Brazil o o 4.50 q
2 B Jennifer Stuczynski United States o 4.50 q
6 A Svetlana Feofanova Russia xo o 4.50 q
6 A April Steiner Bennett United States xo o o 4.50 q
8 A Monika Pyrek Poland o xo 4.50 q
8 B Anna Rogowska Poland o xo 4.50 q
10 B Yuliya Golubchikova Russia o xo xo 4.50 q
10 A Carolin Hingst Germany o xo o xo 4.50 q
12 B Silke Spiegelburg Germany xxo o xo 4.50 q
13 A Naroa Agirre Spain o o o xo xxx   4.40 =SB
14 A Anastasija Reiberger Germany o xo xo xxx   4.40  
15 B Kate Dennison Great Britain xo xo xo xxo xxx   4.40 =PB
16 B Alana Boyd Australia o xxx     4.30  
16 B Roslinda Samsu Malaysia o o o xxx     4.30 =SB
18 B Kelsie Hendry Canada xo xxx     4.30  
19 A Joanna Piwowarska Poland xo o xo xxx     4.30  
19 A Afrodíti Skafída Greece xo xo xxx     4.30  
19 A Sandra-Helena Tavares Portugal o xo xo xxx     4.30  
22 B Nicole Büchler Switzerland xxo o xxo xxx     4.30  
23 A Marion Buisson France o o xx       4.15  
23 B Thórey Edda Elisdóttir Iceland o xxx       4.15  
25 B Zhou Yang China xo o xxx       4.15  
26 B Krisztina Molnár Hungary xxo o xxx       4.15  
27 A Natalya Kushch Ukraine xxo xxx     4.15  
27 B Nikoléta Kiriakopoúlou Greece xxo xxx       4.15  
27 A Li Ling China xxo xxx       4.15  
27 A Yarisley Silva Cuba xxo xxx       4.15  
31 A Alejandra García Argentina xxo xxo xxx       4.15  
32 A Leila Ben Youssef Tunisia xo xxx         4.00  
32 A Vanessa Vandy Finland xo xxx         4.00  
34 B Anna Fitídou Cyprus xxo xxx         4.00  
  B Kateřina Baďurová Czech Republic xxx           NM  
  B Erica Bartolina United States xxx       NM
 

Final

The final was held on August 18.

Rank Name Nationality 4.30 4.45 4.55 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 5.05 Result Notes[7]
1st Yelena Isinbayeva Russia o o xxo xxo 5.05 WR
2nd Jennifer Stuczynski United States o o xo o xxx       4.80  
3rd Svetlana Feofanova Russia o o xo o xxx           4.75 SB
4 Yulia Golubchikova Russia o o xo o xo xxx           4.75 PB
5 Monika Pyrek Poland o o o xo xxx             4.70  
6 Carolin Hingst Germany o o o xxo xxx               4.65 SB
7 Silke Spiegelburg Germany o xo o xxo xxx               4.65  
8 April Steiner Bennett United States o o o xxx                 4.55  
9 Vanessa Boslak France o o xo xxx                 4.55 SB
10 Fabiana Murer Brazil o xxx                 4.45  
10 Anna Rogowska Poland o xxx                   4.45  
12 Gao Shuying China o xxo xxx                   4.45  

 

 

 

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