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1936  Berlin Summer Olympics

1936 Summer Olympics - The Results (Boxing)

Boxing at the 1936 Berlin Summer Games

 

 

Host City: Berlin, Germany
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Events: 8

Participants: 179 (179 men and 0 women) from 31 countries
Youngest Participant: SUI Walter Siegfried (17 years, 143 days)
Oldest Participant: HUN Lajos Szigeti (29 years, 258 days)
Most Medals (Athlete): 24 athletes with 1 medal
Most Medals (Country): GER Germany (5 medals)

Participating nations

A total of 179 boxers from 31 nations competed at the Berlin Games:

 Argentina (8)  Czechoslovakia (8)  Great Britain (8)  New Zealand (3)  Switzerland (8)
 Australia (3)  Denmark (8)  Hungary (6)  Norway (6)  United States (8)
 Austria (6)  Egypt (4)  Italy (8)  Philippines (5)  Uruguay (7)
 Belgium (8)  Estonia (2)  Japan (5)  Poland (7)
 Canada (4)  Finland (6)  Luxembourg (5)  Romania (4)
 Chile (4)  France (6)  Mexico (4)  South Africa (6)
 Republic of China (2)  Germany (8)  Netherlands (8)  Sweden (4)
  

Overview

The boxing tournament of the 1936 Olympic Games took place at the [Deutschlandhalle] in Berlin between the 10th and 15th August. For the first time two rings were erected in the arena although for the later stages one of these was removed. A change of regulations meant that boxers were now forced to be weighed before each contest rather than just at the start of the competition. 179 boxers appeared in the ring although they were over 250 entries; many teams entered two boxers in each class and only decided which would compete after their arrival in Berlin. For the fifth Olympics in succession the weight categories remained unchanged.

These are the results of the boxing competition at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin. Medals were awarded in eight weight classes. The competitions were held from 10 to 15 August.

The competition featured prominently in the French film L'as des as (1982), whose main character, played by Jean-Paul Belmondo, was the fictitious coach of the French boxing team.

  

Medal summary

EventGoldSilverBronze
Flyweight
(−50.8 kg / 112 lb)
Willy Kaiser
 Germany
Gavino Matta
 Italy
Louis Laurie
 United States
Bantamweight
(−53.5 kg / 118 lb)
Ulderico Sergo
 Italy
Jack Wilson
 United States
Fidel Ortiz
 Mexico
Featherweight
(−57.2 kg / 126 lb)
Oscar Casanovas
 Argentina
Charles Catterall
 South Africa
Josef Miner
 Germany
Lightweight
(−61.2 kg / 135 lb)
Imre Harangi
 Hungary
Nikolai Stepulov
 Estonia
Erik Ågren
 Sweden
Welterweight
(−66.7 kg / 147 lb)
Sten Suvio
 Finland
Michael Murach
 Germany
Gerhard Pedersen
 Denmark
Middleweight
(−72.6 kg / 160 lb)
Jean Despeaux
 France
Henry Tiller
 Norway
Raúl Villarreal
 Argentina
Light heavyweight
(−79.4 kg / 175 lb)
Roger Michelot
 France
Richard Vogt
 Germany
Francisco Risiglione
 Argentina
Heavyweight
(over 79.4 kg/175 lb)
Herbert Runge
 Germany
Guillermo Lovell
 Argentina
Erling Nilsen
 Norway
  

Medal table

 
RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Germany (GER) 2 2 1 5
2  France (FRA) 2 0 0 2
3  Argentina (ARG) 1 1 2 4
4  Italy (ITA) 1 1 0 2
5  Finland (FIN) 1 0 0 1
 Hungary (HUN) 1 0 0 1
7  Norway (NOR) 0 1 1 2
 United States (USA) 0 1 1 2
9  Estonia (EST) 0 1 0 1
 South Africa (RSA) 0 1 0 1
11  Denmark (DEN) 0 0 1 1
 Mexico (MEX) 0 0 1 1
 Sweden (SWE) 0 0 1 1
Totals (13 nations) 8 8 8 24
 

Men's Flyweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed.

 

Summary

Two men who had been looked at as possible champions were not eligible for the trip to Berlin, Great Britain’s Pat Palmer, the 1934 European and British Empire champion had recently turned professional as had Johnny Marceline, the US champion of 1935.

The new regulations concerning weighing-in caused more difficulties in the flyweight division than in any other. A number of fancied competitors were forced to move up a weight class in order to avoid the possibility of disqualification. This made the prediction of medal hopefuls very difficult although [Laurie] of the USA, the Frenchman [Fayaud], [Nunag] of the Philippines and the Argentine [Carlomagno] were touted by some as possible champions.

The 18-year old American Lou Laurie, the youngest member of the US team in Berlin, caught the eye in his first round points victory over [Bezděk] of Czechoslovakia with his speed and accuracy. After a bye in the opening round, the German fighter [Willi Kaiser] was also impressive as he forced the referee to stop his second round bout against the Chilean [López] to save the South American from unnecessary punishment. Kaiser continued his progress with a win over the Uruguayan [Fidel Tricánico] in the last eight; Tricánico had been fortunate enough to gain a bye in the first round then saw his prospective second round opponent from Peru withdraw in protest at the treatment of the Peruvian football team. The semi-final stage saw Laurie defeated by the strong Sardinian [Gavino Matta] in a close fight whilst Kaiser turned back the challenge of Carlomagno of Argentina. Laurie won the bronze medal when Carlomagno withdrew and his boxing skills were recognized by the award of the inaugural [Val Barker Trophy], presented to the most stylish boxer in the tournament.

In the final Kaiser went on the attack from the outset, forcing the tempo at close quarters and keeping his opponent at bay. When Matta tried to fight back Kaiser pushed the pace even higher and left the Italian with cuts around both eyes. As he tried to turn the fight around Matta became desperate and was warned for fouling his opponent. Towards the end of the fight the Italian tired and Kaiser wrapped up a points decision and Germany’s first ever boxing gold.

The two men met again a year later in the European championship with the same result, although this time it was for the bronze medal rather than gold. Matta and Laurie later turned professional, the Italian winning his national title.

The men's flyweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the lightest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 112 pounds (50.8 kilograms). The competition was held from Monday, August 10, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

 

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Willy Kaiser
 Germany
Gavino Matta
 Italy
Louis Laurie
 United States

Results

Round of 32
August 10
Round of 16
August 12
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Willy Kaiser (GER)
Bye  Kaiser (GER) W
 Guillermo López (CHI)  López (CHI) RSC3
Bye  Kaiser (GER) PTS
 Fidel Tricánico (URU)  Tricánico (URU) L
Bye  Tricánico (URU)
- - Bye
- -  Kaiser (GER) PTS
 William Passmore (RSA)  Carlomagno (ARG) L
Bye  Passmore (RSA) PTS
 Mahmoud Ezzat (EGY)  Ezzat (EGY) L
Bye  Passmore (RSA) L
 Alfredo Carlomagno (ARG)  Carlomagno (ARG) PTS
Bye  Carlomagno (ARG) PTS
 Chiyoto Nakano (JPN) PTS  Nakano (JPN) L
 Erkki Savolainen (FIN) L  Kaiser (GER) PTS
 Louis Laurie (USA) PTS  Matta (ITA) L
 Rudolf Bezděk (TCH) L  Laurie (USA) PTS
 Asbjørn Berg-Hansen (NOR) PTS  Berg-Hansen (NOR) L
 Alfred Russell (GBR) L  Laurie (USA) PTS
 Edmund Sobkowiak (POL) W  Sobkowiak (POL) L
 Henry C. Cooper (AUS) KO2  Sobkowiak (POL) PTS
 Walter Siegfried (SUI) PTS  Siegfried (SUI) L
 Gaston Fayaud (FRA) L  Laurie (USA) L
 Raoul Degryse (BEL) W  Matta (ITA) PTS
 Sture Hållberg (SWE) KO1  Degryse (BEL) PTS
 Felipe Nunag (PHI) PTS  Nunag (PHI) L Bronze medal bout
 Dumitru Panaitescu (ROU) L  Degryse (BEL) L
 Kaj Frederiksen (DEN) PTS  Matta (ITA) PTS  Laurie (USA) wo
 Fernand Ciatti (LUX) L  Frederiksen (DEN) L  Carlomagno (ARG) -
 Gavino Matta (ITA) PTS  Matta (ITA) PTS
 Tinus Lambillion (NED) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Willi Kaiser 24 Germany GER Gold  
2 Gavino Matta 26 Italy ITA Silver  
3 Lou Laurie 18 United States USA Bronze  
4 Alfredo Carlomagno 18 Argentina ARG    
5T Fidel Tricánico 21 Uruguay URU    
5T William Passmore 21 South Africa RSA    
5T Edmund Sobkowiak 22 Poland POL    
5T Raoul Degryse 23 Belgium BEL    
9T Guillermo López 21 Chile CHI    
9T Mahmoud Ezzat 22 Egypt EGY    
9T Chiyoto Nakano 23 Japan JPN    
9T Asbjørn Berg-Hansen 23 Norway NOR    
9T Walter Siegfried 17 Switzerland SUI    
9T Felipe Nunag 20 Philippines PHI    
9T Kaj Frederiksen 19 Denmark DEN    
16T Erkki Savolainen 18 Finland FIN    
16T Rudolf Bezděk 20 Czechoslovakia TCH    
16T Alf Russell 21 Great Britain GBR    
16T Henry Cooper 22 Australia AUS    
16T Gaston Fayaud 21 France FRA    
16T Sture HÃ¥llberg 19 Sweden SWE    
16T Dumitru Panaitescu 23 Romania ROU    
16T Fernand Ciatti 24 Luxembourg LUX    
16T Tinus Lambillion 23 Netherlands NED  
 

Men's Bantamweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

 

Summary

 

Before the competition began the favourites had included the Italian champion [Ulderico Sergo], who had been the outstanding European bantamweight over the previous twelve months, [Cederberg] of Sweden, the reigning silver medallist from the European championship, and [Jackie Wilson] of the United States who had moved up from flyweight due to problems making the weight. These three lived up to their expectations and were joined in the semi-final by [Ortíz] of Mexico.

Sergo was a factory worker but had received generous backing by the Federazione Pugilistica Italiana and was in excellent physical condition. Sergo defeated Cederberg and moved on to the final where he would meet Wilson for the gold medal. Although Wilson, at 5 ft 10 in/182 cm, was the taller man and had a reach advantage over his opponent, the tenacious Italian took the fight to the American. The first round was close but Sergo moved up a gear from then on, forcing his opponent back onto the ropes and negating his physical advantages. Wilson had been considered the USA’s best chance of a championship but when he tried to turn the fight his way in the final round he had left it too late, Sergo was a clear champion.

Sergo went on to win the European Amateur championships on home soil in 1937 and retain it in 1939 in Dublin. He would have been a strong medal contender for the cancelled 1940 Games. With no prospect of further Olympic success available, Sergo turned professional but no less than six attempts at Italian national titles ended in failure. Jackie Wilson’s professional début came in late 1936 in Los Angeles, where he was to base his career. One of the best lightweights and welterweights of his era, he was unlucky never to earn a world title shot. He did however win a California state title and went the distance with both Sugar Ray Robinson and Jake LaMotta.

The men's bantamweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the second-lightest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 119 pounds (53.5 kilograms). The competition was held from Monday, August 10, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Ulderico Sergo
 Italy
Jack Wilson
 United States
Fidel Ortiz
 Mexico

Results

Round of 32
August 10
Round of 16
August 11
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Joseph Cornelis (BEL) PTS
 José Vergara (CHI) L
 Joseph Cornelis (BEL) L
 Ulderico Sergo (ITA) PTS
 Ulderico Sergo (ITA) PTS
 Frigyes Kubinyi (HUN) L
 Ulderico Sergo (ITA) PTS
 Stig Cederberg (SWE) L
 Stig Cederberg (SWE) PTS
 Walter Mathä (AUT) L
 Stig Cederberg (SWE) PTS
 Shunpei Hashioka (JPN) L
 Shunpei Hashioka (JPN) PTS
 Karl Kummer (SUI) L
 Ulderico Sergo (ITA) PTS
 Fidel Ortiz (MEX) PTS  Jack Wilson (USA) L
 Hervé Lacelles (CAN) L  Fidel Ortiz (MEX) PTS
 Albert Barnes (GBR) PTS  Albert Barnes (GBR) L
 František Doležal (TCH) L  Fidel Ortiz (MEX) PTS
 Alec Hannan (RSA) PTS  Alec Hannan (RSA) L
 Veikko Huuskonen (FIN) L  Alec Hannan (RSA) PTS
 Antoni Czortek (POL) PTS  Antoni Czortek (POL) L
 Pierre Bonnet (FRA) L  Fidel Ortiz (MEX) L Bronze medal bout
 Wilhelm Stasch (GER) PTS  Jack Wilson (USA) PTS
 Marin Gaşpar (ROU) L  Wilhelm Stasch (GER) L  Fidel Ortiz (MEX) PTS
 Oscar de Larrazábal (PHI) PTS  Oscar de Larrazábal (PHI) PTS  Stig Cederberg (SWE) L
 Viggo Frederiksen (DEN) L  Oscar de Larrazábal (PHI) L
 Alfredo Petrone (URU) PTS  Jack Wilson (USA) PTS
 Frans de Moor (NED) L  Alfredo Petrone (URU) L
 Jack Wilson (USA) PTS  Jack Wilson (USA) PTS
 Leonardo Gula (ARG) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Ulderico Sergo 23 Italy ITA Gold  
2 Jackie Wilson 18 United States USA Silver  
3 Fidel Ortíz 27 Mexico MEX Bronze  
4 Stig Cederberg 22 Sweden SWE    
5T Joseph Cornelis 18 Belgium BEL    
5T Shunpei Hashioka 25 Japan JPN    
5T Alec Hannan 20 South Africa RSA    
5T Oscar de Larrazábal 20 Philippines PHI    
9T José Vergara 20 Chile CHI    
9T Frigyes Kubinyi 27 Hungary HUN    
9T Walter Mathä 21 Austria AUT    
9T Karl Kummer 26 Switzerland SUI    
9T Alf Barnes 23 Great Britain GBR    
9T Antoni Czortek 21 Poland POL    
9T Willi Stasch 25 Germany GER    
9T Alfredo Petrone 17 Uruguay URU    
17T Harvey Lacelle 18 Canada CAN    
17T FrantiÅ¡ek Doležal 22 Czechoslovakia TCH    
17T Veikko Huuskonen 26 Finland FIN    
17T Pierre Bonnet 26 France FRA    
17T Marin Gașpar 18 Romania ROU    
17T Viggo Frederiksen 19 Denmark DEN    
17T Jo de Moor 24 Netherlands NED    
17T Leonardo Gula 22 Argentina ARG  
 

Men's Featherweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 11, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

 

Summary

 

Two names missing from the competition were the top rated American [Joe Church], sent home from Berlin by the US boxing team management for disciplinary reasons, and Otto Kästner, the European champion who had been supplanted in the German team by [Josef Miner]. Miner was considered one of the best fighters in the division along with [Catterall] of South Africa, who was the British Empire Games champion, and [Frigyes] of Hungary.

The only stoppage of the first series was that of [Gabuco] of the Phillipines, carried out by the “replacement” US boxer [Ted Kara] in the most impressive display of the early rounds. Kara was not to fight for a medal, as he fell victim to the tricky Catterall in the quarter-finals. [Oscar Casanovas] of Argentina came to notice when he defeated future European champion [Polus] of Poland with ease in the last eight and he followed this up with another impressive victory against the talented Hungarian Frigyes in the semi-finals. The South African Catterall built upon his reputation with a victory over the home boxer Miner in front of an excited Berlin crowd and guaranteed what was to be South Africa’s only medal of the Games.

The final produced a clash of styles, the Argentine edging to victory with a late flourish, landing a series of hooks on his opponent. Although this continued the run of Argentine boxing victories that had started in 1928, the Argentine team themselves were disappointed with only a single gold medal.

Catterall later became a South African professional champion whilst Miner was a victim of World War II.

The men's featherweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the third-lightest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 126 pounds (57.2 kilograms). The competition was held from Tuesday to Saturday, 11 to 15 August 1936. Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

 

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Oscar Casanovas
 Argentina
Charles Catterall
 South Africa
Josef Miner
 Germany

Results

Round of 32
11 August
Round of 16
12 August
Quarterfinals
13 August
Semifinals
14 August
Final
15 August
 Dezső Frigyes (HUN)
Bye  Frigyes (HUN) PTS
 Sigfred Madsen (DEN)  Madsen (DEN) L
Bye  Frigyes (HUN) PTS
 William Marquart (CAN)  Marquart (CAN) L
Bye  Marquart (CAN) PTS
 Josef Jelen (TCH)  Jelen (TCH) L
Bye  Frigyes (HUN) L
 Aleksander Polus (POL)  Casanovas (ARG) PTS
Bye  Polus (POL)
Bye
 Polus (POL) L
 Oscar Casanovas (ARG)  Casanovas (ARG) PTS
Bye  Casanovas (ARG) PTS
 Åke Karlsson (FIN) PTS  Karlsson (FIN) L
 Clarrie Gordon (NZL) L  Casanovas (ARG) PTS
 John Treadaway (GBR) PTS  Catterall (RSA) L
 Giuseppe Farfanelli (ITA) L  Treadaway (GBR) PTS
 Arquímedes Arrieta (URU) PTS  Arrieta (URU) L
 Sajiro Miyama (JPN) L  Treadaway (GBR) L
 Remi Lescrauwaet (BEL) PTS  Miner (GER) PTS
 Karl Zurflüh (SUI) L  Lescrauwaet (BEL) L
 Josef Miner (GER) PTS  Miner (GER) PTS
 Khalil Amira El-Maghrabi (EGY) L  Miner (GER) L
 Charles Catterall (RSA) PTS  Catterall (RSA) PTS
 Hans Wiltschek (AUT) L  Catterall (RSA) PTS
 Jan Nicolaas (NED) PTS  Nicolaas (NED) L Bronze medal bout
 Sabino Islas (MEX) L  Catterall (RSA) PTS
 Evald Seeberg (EST) PTS  Kara (USA) L  Miner (GER) PTS
 Nicolae Berechet (ROU) L  Seeberg (EST) L  Frigyes (HUN) L
 Theodore Kara (USA) W  Kara (USA) PTS
 Felipe Gabuco (PHI) RSC3

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Oscar Casanovas 22 Argentina ARG Gold  
2 Charles Catterall 21 South Africa RSA Silver  
3 Josef Miner 22 Germany GER Bronze  
4 Dezső Frigyes 22 Hungary HUN    
5T Billy Marquart 21 Canada CAN    
5T Aleksander Polus 22 Poland POL    
5T Jack Treadaway 22 Great Britain GBR    
5T Ted Kara 20 United States USA    
9T Sigfred Madsen 20 Denmark DEN    
9T Josef Jelen 21 Czechoslovakia TCH    
9T Åke Karlsson 24 Finland FIN    
9T Arquímedes Arrieta 18 Uruguay URU    
9T Remi Lescrauwaet 20 Belgium BEL    
9T Jan Nicolaas 23 Netherlands NED    
9T Evald Seeberg 25 Estonia EST    
16T Clarrie Gordon 19 New Zealand NZL    
16T Giuseppe Farfanelli 21 Italy ITA    
16T Sajiro Miyama 19 Japan JPN    
16T Karl Zurflüh 23 Switzerland SUI    
16T Khalil Amira El-Maghrabi 22 Egypt EGY    
16T Hans Wiltschek 24 Austria AUT    
16T Sabino Islas 18 Mexico MEX    
16T Nicolae Berechet 21 Romania ROU    
16T Felipe Gabuco 20 Philippines PHI    
 

Men's Lightweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 11, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

 Twenty-six boxers from 26 nations competed.

 

Summary

 

One of the favored fighters in this division was Germany’s [Karl Schmedes], European Championship bronze medallist, but he was eliminated in the very first bout of the competition by [José Padilla] of the Philippines, who had also competed in Los Angeles.

The second round saw the exit of the European champion, [Facchin] of Italy and the big punching Belgian [Dewinter]. Dewinter’s fight with [Andy Scrivani] of the USA was costly for the American, a number of cuts were opened up above his eyes and the resultant damage was blamed for impeding him in his quarter-final loss against the Swede, [Erik Ågren]. Ågren impressed those at ringside with his skilful performance against the courageous American, was briefly considered a possible champion but then lost his next fight to [Stepulov] of Estonia.

[José Padilla]’s medal hopes were ended by [Imre Harangi] of Hungary in the last eight and the Hungarian continued his run to the final by defeating [Kops] of Denmark. Estonia had never entered a boxing team before but Nikolai Stepulov won the vote of the judges in his first four contests and found himself in the final against Harangi.

The Estonian started strongly in the final and observers judged him to have taken the first round with a crisp display of punching. By this time Harangi had began bleeding over both eyes, one cut was measured at nearly four centimetres, and his vision was becoming impaired. Despite his injuries the Hungarian fought back and from the second round onwards took the upper hand. An appreciative crowd cheered him as he edged ahead and took the verdict.

Stepulov and Ågren went on to win medals at the 1937 European championships. In the professional ranks. Simon Dewinter, who fought and lost a European title match, was most successful.

The men's lightweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the fourth-lightest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 135 pounds (61.2 kilograms). The competition was held from Tuesday, August 11, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Twenty-six boxers from 26 nations competed.

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Imre Harangi
 Hungary
Nikolai Stepulov
 Estonia
Erik Ågren
 Sweden

Results

Round of 32
August 11
Round of 16
August 12
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Lidoro Oliver (ARG) PTS
 Norman Fisher (NZL) L
 Lidoro Oliver (ARG) L
 Poul Kops (DEN) PTS
 Poul Kops (DEN) PTS
 Ragnar Haugen (NOR) L
 Poul Kops (DEN) L
 Imre Harangi (HUN) PTS
 Imre Harangi (HUN) PTS
 Robert Seidel (SUI) L
 Imre Harangi (HUN) PTS
 José Padilla (PHI) PTS  José Padilla, Jr. (PHI) L
 Karl Schmedes (GER) L  José Padilla, Jr. (PHI) PTS
 Czesław Cyraniak (POL) PTS  Czesław Cyraniak (POL) L
 François Aupetit (FRA) L  Imre Harangi (HUN) PTS
 Nikolai Stepulov (EST) PTS  Nikolai Stepulov (EST) L
 André Wollscheidt (LUX) L  Nikolai Stepulov (EST) PTS
 Hidekichi Nagamatsu (JPN) W  Hidekichi Nagamatsu (JPN) L
 Jan Chytrý (TCH) DIS2  Nikolai Stepulov (EST) PTS
 Carlos Lillo (CHI) PTS  Carlos Lillo (CHI) L
 Thomas Hamilton-Brown (RSA) L  Carlos Lillo (CHI) PTS
 Kosta Hakim (EGY) PTS  Kosta Hakim (EGY) L
 André Rasenberg (NED) L  Nikolai Stepulov (EST) PTS Bronze medal bout
 Simon Dewinter (BEL) W  Erik Ågren (SWE) L
 Alois Swatosch (AUT) KO1  Simon Dewinter (BEL) L  Erik Ågren (SWE) wo
 Andy Scrivani (USA) PTS  Andy Scrivani (USA) PTS  Poul Kops (DEN)
 Frederick Simpson (GBR) L  Andy Scrivani (USA) L
 Marino Facchin (ITA) PTS  Erik Ågren (SWE) PTS
 Constantin David (ROU) L  Marino Facchin (ITA) L
 Erik Ågren (SWE) PTS  Erik Ågren (SWE) PTS
 Lorenzo Delgado (MEX) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Imre Harangi 22 Hungary HUN Gold  
2 Nikolai Stepulov 23 Estonia EST Silver  
3 Erik Ågren 20 Sweden SWE Bronze  
4 Poul Kops 20 Denmark DEN    
5T Lidoro Oliver 20 Argentina ARG    
5T José Padilla 25 Philippines PHI    
5T Carlos Lillo 20 Chile CHI    
5T Andy Scrivani 19 United States USA    
9T Norm Fisher 20 New Zealand NZL    
9T Ragnar Haugen 24 Norway NOR    
9T Robert Seidel 18 Switzerland SUI    
9T Czesław Cyraniak 22 Poland POL    
9T Hidekichi Nagamatsu 21 Japan JPN    
9T Kosta Hakim 19 Egypt EGY    
9T Simon Dewinter 27 Belgium BEL    
9T Marino Facchin 23 Italy ITA    
17T Karl Schmedes 27 Germany GER    
17T François Aupetit 23 France FRA    
17T André Wollscheidt 22 Luxembourg LUX    
17T Jan Chytrý 19 Czechoslovakia TCH    
17T Thomas Hamilton-Brown 20 South Africa RSA    
17T André Rasenberg 22 Netherlands NED    
17T Alois Swatosch 25 Austria AUT    
17T Freddie Simpson 20 Great Britain GBR    
17T Constantin David 23 Romania ROU    
17T Lorenzo Delgado 19 Mexico MEX  
 

Men's Welterweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

 

Summary

 

The welterweight division had no clear favourite although the German fighter, [Michael Murach], was expected to perform well in front of a home audience. [Imre Mándi] of Hungary and [Cook] of Australia were also expected to put in strong performances.

Mándi’s victory over the US boxer [Chester Rutecki] was hotly disputed by the American team management, Mándi hit the canvas in the first round and was warned for fouling on four occasions but won the decision. US boxing coach Johnny Behr was quoted as saying "This beats the Olympic record for terrible decisions" and the US boxing team withdrew from the Olympics, only to reconsider their decision an hour later. Another controversy occurred in the very first bout of the competition, when Uruguay's [Costanzo] was disqualified in his match against [Tritz] of France, his supporters surrounded the ring and threatened to slit the referee’s throat.

Finland’s [Sten Suvio] was not blessed with an easy draw, he faced Cook and Mándi in successive rounds but managed to gain the decision over both. After a semi-final victory over the eventual bronze medal winner, [Pedersen] of Denmark, he found himself facing Murach in the final. Very much the outsider in the final, Suvio bided his time in the first three minutes as Murach launched his attacks. Suvio's opportunity came halfway through the second round; a hard right hand stopped the German in his tracks and changed the course of the fight. The Finn began to dominate, landing punch after punch and Murach briefly visited the canvas as he tired badly. Suvio's victory was the first gold medal victory by a Finnish boxer.

Micheal Murach went on to defeat Mándi in the final of the 1937 European Championship but was to die fighting on the Eastern Front in 1941, Sven Suvio fought in the Finnish army but survived to resume his modestly successful career as a professional. [Raúl Rodríguez] of Argentina, who lost in the last eight became professional middleweight champion of South America.

The men's welterweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the fourth-heaviest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 147 pounds (66.7 kilograms). The competition was held from Monday, August 10, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Twenty-four boxers from 24 nations competed

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Sten Suvio
 Finland
Michael Murach
 Germany
Gerhard Pedersen
 Denmark

Results

Round of 32
August 10
Round of 16
August 11
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Michael Murach (GER) PTS
 Walter Pack (GBR) L
 Michael Murach (GER) PTS
 Hens Dekkers (NED) L
 Hens Dekkers (NED) PTS
 Gaspard Deridder (BEL) L
 Michael Murach (GER) PTS
 Roger Tritz (FRA) L
 Simplicio de Castro (PHI) PTS
 Mathias Sancassiani (LUX) L
 Simplicio de Castro (PHI) L
 Roger Tritz (FRA) PTS
 Walter Grieb (SUI) L
 Roger Tritz (FRA) W  Roger Tritz (FRA) PTS
 Francisco Costanzo (URU) DIS2  Michael Murach (GER) L
 Chester Rutecki (USA) PTS  Sten Suvio (FIN) PTS
 Maurice Camyré (CAN) L  Chester Rutecki (USA) L
 Imre Mándi (HUN) PTS  Imre Mándi (HUN) PTS
 Umberto Pittori (ITA) L  Imre Mándi (HUN) L
 Sten Suvio (FIN) PTS  Sten Suvio (FIN) PTS
 Keikan Ri (JPN) L  Sten Suvio (FIN) PTS
 Leonard Cook (AUS) PTS  Leonard Cook (AUS) L
 Józef Pisarski (POL) L  Sten Suvio (FIN) PTS Bronze medal bout
 Gerhard Pedersen (DEN) L
 Thomas Arbuthnott (NZL) L  Gerhard Pedersen (DEN) PTS
 Raúl Rodríguez (ARG) PTS  Raúl Rodríguez (ARG) PTS  Roger Tritz (FRA) L
 Stanislav Rajdl (TCH) L  Raúl Rodríguez (ARG) L
 Rudolf Andreassen (NOR) PTS  Gerhard Pedersen (DEN) PTS
 Emilio Ballado (MEX) L  Rudolf Andreassen (NOR) L
 Gerhard Pedersen (DEN) PTS  Gerhard Pedersen (DEN) PTS
 Enrique Giaverini (CHI) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Sten Suvio 24 Finland FIN Gold  
2 Michael Murach 25 Germany GER Silver  
3 Gerhard Pedersen 24 Denmark DEN Bronze  
4 Roger Tritz 21 France FRA    
5T Hens Dekkers 21 Netherlands NED    
5T Simplicio de Castro 22 Philippines PHI    
5T Imre Mándi 19 Hungary HUN    
5T Raúl Rodríguez 20 Argentina ARG    
9T Walter Pack 21 Great Britain GBR    
9T Gaspard Deridder 18 Belgium BEL    
9T Metty Sancassiani 29 Luxembourg LUX    
9T Walter Grieb 25 Switzerland SUI    
9T Chester Rutecki 19 United States USA    
9T Rusty Cook 24 Australia AUS    
9T Tom Arbuthnott 25 New Zealand NZL    
9T Rudolf Andreassen 27 Norway NOR    
17T Francisco Costanzo 23 Uruguay URU    
17T Maurice Camyré 21 Canada CAN    
17T Umberto Pittori 23 Italy ITA    
17T Keikan Ri 21 Japan JPN    
17T Józef Pisarski 23 Poland POL    
17T Stanislav Rajdl 25 Czechoslovakia TCH    
17T Emilio Ballado 20 Mexico MEX    
17T Enrique Giaverini 27 Chile CHI  
 

Men's Middleweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 11, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Nineteen boxers from 19 nations competed

 

Summary

 

One of the hot favourites for the Olympic title never reached the ring. [Irving Pease] of Canada was considered the best fighter from outside Europe but failed to make the required weight amidst allegations from the Canadian delegation that he had treated the trip to Berlin as a mere “joyride”.

When the competition got underway the crowd saw the first ever Chinese boxer take part in Olympic competition although his début was a brief one. [Chin Kuaiti] was knocked out in the opening round of his first bout but his opponent, [Shrimpton] of Britain, was then disqualified for not obeying the referee's instructions prior to the knockout blow. Unfortunately for the Chinese boxer the decision was reversed the next day.

Two other boxers who failed to record a victory were the reigning European champion, [Lajos Szigeti] of Hungary and the welterweight bronze medallist from Los Angeles, Finland’s [Bruno Ahlberg], both were defeated in the second series having drawn byes in the first round of competition. The Norwegian fighter [Henry Tiller] moved through the rounds and his countrymen began seeing him as a prospective champion when he defeated the champions of South Africa, England and Germany in succession and then knocked down [Chmielewski] of Poland "at least half a dozen" times to gain a place in the gold medal match. The Norwegians were to be disappointed by a stylish French boxer by the name of [Jean Despeaux]. Despeaux varied his punches and style of fighting during the final and avoided the harder punches of Tiller. The Frenchman's speed of hand became the deciding factor as the final was fought at a distance.

When the two men met again later in the year, Tiller beat Despeaux in contests in both Trondheim and Oslo. Despeaux turned professional and continued to box during the German occupation. He held the national middleweight twice between 1941 and 1945. After the war he had a brief career acting in French movies. Tiller stayed as an amateur and dominated Norwegian boxing, he even claimed the British ABA championship in 1938 - a rarity for a fighter from outside Britain and Ireland and unique for a Norwegian. He would have been one for the favourites if the 1940 Games had gone ahead. With the lure of an Olympic title gone, he opted for a professional career which ended prematurely after the German invasion of Norway.

The men's middleweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the third-heaviest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 160 pounds (72.6 kilograms). The competition was held from Tuesday, August 11, 1936, to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Nineteen boxers from 19 nations competed

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Jean Despeaux
 France
Henry Tiller
 Norway
Raúl Villarreal
 Argentina

Results

Round of 32
August 11
Round of 16
August 12
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Raúl Villarreal (ARG) PTS
 Hans Zehetmayer (AUT) L
 Raúl Villarreal (ARG) PTS
 Tin Dekkers (NED) L
 Tin Dekkers (NED) PTS
 Gunnar Andreasen (DEN) L
 Raúl Villarreal (ARG) L
 Jean Despeaux (FRA) PTS
 Josef Hrubeš (TCH) PTS
 Lajos Szigeti (HUN) L
 Josef Hrubeš (TCH) L
 Jean Despeaux (FRA) PTS
 Jean Despeaux (FRA) PTS
 Juan Bregaliano (URU) L
 Jean Despeaux (FRA) PTS
 Henry Tiller (NOR) L
 Jimmy Clark (USA) PTS
 Bruno Ahlberg (FIN) L
 Jimmy Clark (USA) L
 Henryk Chmielewski (POL) PTS
 Henryk Chmielewski (POL) PTS
 Jean De Schryver (BEL) L
 Henryk Chmielewski (POL) L Bronze medal bout
 Henry Tiller (NOR) PTS
 Benito Totti (ITA) L  Villarreal (ARG) wo
 Adolf Baumgarten (GER) PTS  Adolf Baumgarten (GER) PTS  Chmielewski (POL) -
 Alfred Flury (SUI) L  Adolf Baumgarten (GER) L
 Henry Tiller (NOR) PTS  Henry Tiller (NOR) PTS
 Edward Peltz (RSA) L  Henry Tiller (NOR) PTS
 Richard Shrimpton (GBR) W  Richard Shrimpton (GBR) L
 Chin Kuai-Ti (ROC) KO1
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Jean Despeaux 20 France FRA Gold  
2 Henry Tiller 22 Norway NOR Silver  
3 Raúl Villarreal 26 Argentina ARG Bronze  
4 Henryk Chmielewski 22 Poland POL    
5T Tin Dekkers 19 Netherlands NED    
5T Josef HrubeÅ¡ 19 Czechoslovakia TCH    
5T Jimmy Clark 22 United States USA    
5T Addi Baumgarten 21 Germany GER    
9T Hans Zehetmayer 27 Austria AUT    
9T Gunnar Andreasen 22 Denmark DEN    
9T Lajos Szigeti 29 Hungary HUN    
9T Juan Bregaliano 24 Uruguay URU    
9T Bruno Ahlberg 25 Finland FIN    
9T Albert De Schryver 20 Belgium BEL    
9T Benito Totti 22 Italy ITA    
9T Richard Shrimpton 26 Great Britain GBR    
17T Alfred Flury 21 Switzerland SUI    
17T Eddie Peltz 19 South Africa RSA    
17T Chin Kuaiti 21 China CHN    
 

Men's Light-Heavyweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Twenty-one boxers from 21 nations competed

 

Summary

 

[Roger Michelot] of France, who had reached the middleweight semi-finals in Los Angeles, returned for another attempt at Olympic glory and was amongst those touted for success in a division which had a number of contenders but no clear favourite. One of those contenders, [Carl Vinciquerra], the US national amateur champion was the victim of a major shock in the opening round, the unheralded Egyptian fighter [Mohamed Amin] defeating him on points.

The final matched Michelot with Germany’s [Richard Vogt] and at first it appeared as Vogt was to cruise to victory. The German’s superior reach dominated the first three minutes and he took the round clearly. It was then that Michelot put his experience to work, punishing Vogt for his overconfidence and changing the course of the fight. An attack by Vogt had Michelot reeling in the last few moments of the fight but the Frenchman had done enough to win the championship.

Vogt had a professional career with included three separate reigns as German light-heavyweight champion. An attempt at the European title was lost but he did have the distinction of being the man who ended the career of former heavyweight champion Max Schmeling. [Robey Leibbrandt] of South Africa, who defaulted through injury from the bronze medal match, served seven years in prison in his native country. He was convicted of treason after working as an agent for the Nazis.

The men's light heavyweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the second-heaviest contested, and allowed boxers of up to 175 pounds (79.4 kilograms). The competition was held from Monday, August 10, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Twenty-one boxers from 21 nations competed

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Roger Michelot
 France
Richard Vogt
 Germany
Francisco Risiglione
 Argentina

Results

Round of 32
August 10
Round of 16
August 11
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 Francisco Risiglione (ARG)
Bye  Risiglione (ARG) PTS
 Jean-Pierre Graser (LUX)  Graser (LUX) L
Bye  Risiglione (ARG) PTS
 Thomas Griffin (GBR)  Griffin (GBR) L
Bye  Griffin (GBR) PTS
 Antonio Adipe (URU)  Adipe (URU) L
Bye  Risiglione (ARG) L
 Hannes Koivunen (FIN)  Vogt (GER) PTS
Bye  Koivunen (FIN) PTS
 Oliver Shanks (CAN)  Shanks (CAN) L
Bye  Koivunen (FIN) L
 Richard Vogt (GER)  Vogt (GER) PTS
Bye  Vogt (GER) PTS
 Erminio Bolzan (ITA)  Bolzan (ITA) L
Bye  Vogt (GER) L
 Roger Michelot (FRA)  Michelot (FRA) PTS
Bye  Michelot (FRA)
- - Bye
- -  Michelot (FRA) PTS
 Børge Holm (DEN) PTS  Holm (DEN) L
 Paul Schweifer (AUT) L  Holm (DEN) PTS
 Wim Fock (NED) PTS  Fock (NED) L
 Wang Yunlan (ROC) L  Michelot (FRA) PTS
 Leslie Harley (AUS) PTS  Leibbrandt (RSA) L
 Walter van Bueren (SUI) L  Harley (AUS) L
 František Havelka (TCH) PTS  Havelka (TCH) PTS Bronze medal bout
 Pol Goffaux (BEL) L  Havelka (TCH) L
 Robey Leibbrandt (RSA) PTS  Leibbrandt (RSA) PTS  Risiglione (ARG) wo
 Jarl Johnsen (NOR) L  Leibbrandt (RSA) PTS  Leibbrandt (RSA) -
 Mohammed Amin (EGY) PTS  Amin (EGY) L
 Carl Vinciquerra (USA) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Roger Michelot 24 France FRA Gold  
2 Richard Vogt 23 Germany GER Silver  
3 Francisco Resiglione 19 Argentina ARG Bronze  
4 Robey Leibbrandt 23 South Africa RSA    
5T Tommy Griffin 23 Great Britain GBR    
5T Hannes Koivunen 24 Finland FIN    
5T Børge Holm 25 Denmark DEN    
5T FrantiÅ¡ek Havelka 28 Czechoslovakia TCH    
9T Jim Graser 21 Luxembourg LUX    
9T Antonio Adipe 24 Uruguay URU    
9T Oliver Shanks 20 Canada CAN    
9T Erminio Bolzan 28 Italy ITA    
9T Wim Fock 27 Netherlands NED    
9T Leslie Harley 23 Australia AUS    
9T Mohamed Amin 22 Egypt EGY    
16T Paul Schweifer 22 Austria AUT    
16T Wang Yunlan 23 China CHN    
16T Walter von Bueren 24 Switzerland SUI    
16T Pol Goffaux 19 Belgium BEL    
16T Jarl Johnsen 22 Norway NOR    
16T Carl Vinciquerra 21 United States USA  
 

Men's Heavyweight

 Host City: Berlin, Germany
Venue(s): Germany Hall, Berlin
Date Started: August 10, 1936
Date Finished: August 15, 1936
Format: Single elimination tournament.

Seventeen boxers from 17 nations competed

 

Summary

 

Traditionally the highlight of the boxing competition, this was expected to be a close fought competition with a number of highly regarded fighters in contention. One such fighter was the Belgian [Albert Robbe], an American newspaper reported that he had the reputation of being "Three parts fighting tiger to one part Jack Dempsey". After his abysmal performance in losing to [Ferenc Nagy] of Hungary they changed this description to have him "stinking like a Gorgonzola cheese".

Another favoured contender, the American [Art Oliver], who had served as a sparring partner to the great Joe Louis, lost to the teenage Swede [Olle Tandberg] in his first bout. The most unusual performance of the tournament came from one of the Austrian coaches who, after his fighter [Karl Lutz] had lost to a boxer from Luxembourg, ran around the ring literally tearing his hair out; he pulled large tufts of his hair out as an apparent protest at the verdict.

The German champion [Herbert Runge] moved into the semi-finals with an easy knockout over a Czechoslovakian and a hard fought points victory over the British entry. His opponent in the semis should have been Nagy but the Hungarian had been injured in his defeat of Tandberg and was forced to withdraw from the tournament. The other semi-final pairing brought together [Erling Nielsen] of Norway, who had knocked out both his previous opponents and [Guillermo Lovell] of Argentina, brother of the 1932 heavyweight gold medallist, [Alberto Lovell]. Lovell's raw aggression was a little too much for his Norwegian opponent, who had to settle for bronze.

The final started explosively with Lovell and Runge exchanging powerful punches throughout a reasonably even first round. The decisive moment came near the end of the second round when Runge knocked Lovell to the floor, the bell saved the Argentine from a possible stoppage. Runge had the upper hand from then on but although he ended the fight with what appeared to be bite marks on his shoulder, it was Runge who received two warnings from the British referee.

Runge, an apprentice butcher by trade, was eight times national amateur champion between 1935 and 1943 and was three times a medallist at the European Championships, although the Olympic gold was his only major international title. Turning professional at the age of thirty-three he had an unsuccessful attempt at the German title. Erling Nielsen won a bronze medal at the 1937 Europeans but Olle Tandberg went on to win the gold at that tournament and retain it in 1939, he would have a favourite for the abortive 1940 Games. Tandberg had a professional career which culminated in a world heavyweight title eliminator against Jersey Joe Walcott. 43,000 spectators at the [RÃ¥sunda Stadium], Stockholm watched Tandberg knocked down four times in a five-round defeat. Art Oliver was tragically killed in 1944 when a vehicle in which he was a passenger collided with a train.

The men's heavyweight event was part of the boxing programme at the 1936 Summer Olympics. The weight class was the heaviest contested, and allowed boxers over 175 pounds (79.4 kilograms). The competition was held from Monday, August 10, 1936 to Saturday, August 15, 1936. Seventeen boxers from 17 nations competed.

Medalists

Gold Silver Bronze
Herbert Runge
 Germany
Guillermo Lovell
 Argentina
Erling Nilsen
 Norway

Results

Round of 32
August 10
Round of 16
August 11
Quarterfinals
August 13
Semifinals
August 14
Final
August 15
 José Feans (URU) PTS
 Stanisław Piłat (POL) L
 José Feans (URU) KO2
 Guillermo Lovell (ARG) W
 Guillermo Lovell (ARG) PTS
 Omar Hermansen (DEN) L
 Guillermo Lovell (ARG) PTS
 Erling Nilsen (NOR) L
 Ernest Toussaint (LUX) PTS
 Karl Lutz (AUT) L
 Ernest Toussaint (LUX) KO2
 Erling Nilsen (NOR) W
 Erling Nilsen (NOR) W
 Walter Marti (SUI) DIS3
 Guillermo Lovell (ARG) L
 Herbert Runge (GER) PTS
 Olle Tandberg (SWE) PTS
 Art Oliver (USA) L
 Olle Tandberg (SWE) L
 Ferenc Nagy (HUN) PTS
 Ferenc Nagy (HUN) PTS
 Albert Robbe (BEL) L
 Ferenc Nagy (HUN) - Bronze medal bout
 Herbert Runge (GER) wo
 Herbert Runge (GER) W  Erling Nilsen (NOR) wo
 Rudolf Kus (TCH) KO1  Ferenc Nagy (HUN) -
 Herbert Runge (GER) PTS
 Anthony Stuart (GBR) L
 Secondo De Marchi (ITA) L
 Anthony Stuart (GBR) PTS  Anthony Stuart (GBR) PTS
 Ab van Bemmel (NED) L
 

Final Standings

 
RankAthleteAgeTeamNOCMedal 
1 Herbert Runge 23 Germany GER Gold  
2 Guillermo Lovell 18 Argentina ARG Silver  
3 Erling Nilsen 25 Norway NOR Bronze  
4 Ferenc Nagy 19 Hungary HUN    
5T José Feans 24 Uruguay URU    
5T Ernest Toussaint 28 Luxembourg LUX    
5T Olle Tandberg 17 Sweden SWE    
5T Anthony Stuart 28 Great Britain GBR    
9T Stanisław Piłat 27 Poland POL    
9T Omar Hermansen 22 Denmark DEN    
9T Karl Lutz 22 Austria AUT    
9T Walter Marti 26 Switzerland SUI    
9T Art Oliver 25 United States USA    
9T Albert Robbe 20 Belgium BEL    
9T Rudolf Kus 21 Czechoslovakia TCH    
9T Secondo De Marchi 25 Italy ITA    
17 Albert van Bemmel 23 Netherlands NED  
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