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1988  Seoul Summer Olympics

1988 Summer Olympics - Olympic Venues

Venues of the 1988 Summer Olympics

 

  For the 1988 Summer Olympics, a total of thirty-one sports venues were used. South Korea hosted its first World Championships in 1978 in shooting sports. Three years later, Seoul was awarded the 1988 Summer Olympics. Many of the venues constructed for the 1988 Games were completed two years earlier in time for the Asian Games. The 1986 Asian Games served as test events for the 1988 Summer Olympics. The men's marathon course was lined by 36,000  policemen. Steffi Graf won a gold medal in women's singles to complete the "Golden Slam". None of the football venues used for these games were used for the 2002 FIFA World Cup that Korea co-hosted with Japan

Venues

Seoul Sports Complex

Venue Sports Capacity
Jamsil Baseball Stadium Baseball (demonstration) 30,306
Jamsil Gymnasium Basketball, Volleyball (final) 13,409
Jamsil Indoor Swimming Pool Diving, Modern pentathlon (swimming), Swimming, Synchronized swimming, Water polo 8,000
Jamsil Students' Gymnasium Boxing 7,500
Seoul Olympic Stadium Athletics, Equestrian (jumping individual final), Football (final) 69,950

Olympic Park

Venue Sports Capacity
Mongchon Tosong Modern pentathlon (running) 10,000
Olympic Fencing Gymnasium Fencing, Modern pentathlon (fencing) 7,000
Olympic Gymnastics Hall Gymnastics 14,730
Olympic Tennis Center Tennis 15,000
Olympic Velodrome Cycling (track) 6,000
Olympic Weightlifting Gymnasium Weightlifting 4,000

New venues

Venue Sports Capacity
Busan Yachting Center Sailing 80
Han River Regatta Course/Canoeing Site Canoeing, Rowing 25,000
Hanyang University Gymnasium Volleyball preliminaries 8,000
Saemaul Sports Hall Volleyball preliminaries 4,500
Sangmu Gymnasium Wrestling 5,000
Seoul Equestrian Park Equestrian (all but jumping individual final), Modern pentathlon (riding) 30,000
Seoul National University Gymnasium Badminton (demonstration), table tennis 5,000
Suwon Gymnasium Handball 6,000

Existing venues

Venue Sports Capacity
Hwarang Archery Field Archery 1,200
Jangchung Gymnasium Judo, Taekwondo (demonstration) 7,000
Royal Bowling Center Bowling (demonstration) Not listed.
Seongnam Stadium Field hockey 23,262
Streets of Seoul Athletics (20 km/ 50 km walk, marathon) Not listed.
Taenung International Shooting Range Modern pentathlon (shooting), Shooting 2,505
Tongillo Road Course Cycling (individual road race, road team time trial) 800

Football venues

Venue Sports Capacity
Busan Stadium Football preliminaries 30,000
Daegu Stadium Football preliminaries 23,278
Daejeon Stadium Football preliminaries 30,000
Dongdaemun Stadium Football preliminaries 26,383
Gwangju Stadium Football preliminaries 30,000

Before the Olympics

The oldest venue, Dongdaemun Stadium, was built in 1926. The stadium underwent three renovations between 1926 and the 1988 Summer Olympics. Busan Goodek Stadium was built in 1928. Dageu Stadium was constructed in 1948 and renovated in 1975. Daejeon Stadium was completed in 1964.

Taenung International Shooting Range was constructed in 1972 following the Summer Olympics that took place in Munich. Six years later, the venue made history by becoming the first to host a world championships for shooting sports. This venue was renovated in 1987-8 before the 1988 Games to comply with International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF, then Union International de Tir (UIT)) standards.

Jangchung Gymnasium hosted the 1979 FIBA World Championship for Women.

The success of the UIT World Shooting Championships that year led to the formation of a bid committee to bring the 1988 Games to Seoul. Among Seoul's competitors were Melbourne, Australia, host of the 1956 Summer Olympics, and Nagoya, Japan. Seoul submitted its bid to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in late 1980 though Melbourne withdrew its bid in early 1981. At the 1981 IOC meeting in Baden-Baden, West Germany (Germany since October 1990), the IOC selected Seoul to host the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Venues for the Seoul Sports Complex were constructed between 1973 and 1984. Except for Mongchon Tosong and the Tongillo Road Course, all of the other venues were completed or renovated by the summer of 1986. Many of the venues would play host to the Asian Games in 1986 which would serve as test events for the 1988 Summer Olympics.

During the Olympics

The men's marathon course was run in hot weather along a route lined with 36,000 police personnel. At the Han River Regatta Course/ Canoeing Site during the men's K-1 1000 m canoeing event, it was announced that Australia's Grant Davies had won the event, but that was reversed a few minutes later by a jury of the International Canoe Federation that American Greg Barton had won the event in a photo finish by 0.005 seconds. In the men's rowing coxless fours final, the Soviet team finished last to one of their seats breaking in the middle of the race.

During the fifth race of the sailing Finn event near Busan, Canada's Lawrence Lemieux was in second place when he noticed Joseph Chan of Singapore in the water 25 yd (23 m) from his capsized boat. Lemieux abandoned his position and rescued Chan and Chan's Singapore teammate. Even though Lemieux finished last in the race, the IOC gave him second place for the race as a result of Lemieux's heroic efforts.[39][40] Lemieux would be awarded the IOC Pierre de Coubertin medal at the Finn medal awards ceremony by President Juan Antonio Samaranch.

The tennis venue for the women's singles event witnessed West Germany's Steffi Graf defeating Argentina's Gabriella Sabatini to win the "Golden Slam", including the Grand Slam events in Australia, France, Wimbledon, and the United States.

After the Olympics

Olympic Stadium continues to be of use to many events as of 2010. When Korea co-hosted the 2002 FIFA World Cup with Japan, none of the 1988 Summer Olympic venues used for football were used for those events.Dongdaemun Stadium was demolished in 2008.

Seoul Sports Complex

Seoul Sports Complex (Korean: 서울종합운동장), also known as Jamsil Sports Complex (Korean: 잠실종합운동장), is a group of sports facilities in Songpa-gu in Seoul, South Korea. It was built for the 1986 Asian Games and 1988 Summer Olympics from December 1976 to September 1984. The complex is South Korea's largest integrated sports center, spanning an area of 402,816 m². The complex consists of the Olympic Stadium, Auxiliary Stadium, Jamsil Arena, Jamsil Baseball Stadium, Jamsil Indoor Swimming Pool, Jamsil Inline Skating Rink and the Sports Park.

Jamsil Baseball Stadium

Jamsil Baseball Stadium (Korean: 잠실 야구장; Hanja: 蠶室野球場) is a baseball stadium located at 25 Olympic-ro, Songpa-gu, Seoul, South Korea. The stadium holds 25,553 people and was built from April 1980 to July 1982. It makes up the Seoul Sports Complex along with the nearby Seoul Olympic Stadium, and hosted the baseball events during the 1988 Summer Olympics.

It is the home of the LG Twins and Doosan Bears of the KBO. The area of Jamsil Baseball Stadium is 26,331 square metres (283,420 sq ft). It has one basement level. It is three stories high with a center-field distance of 125 metres (410 ft) and side distances of 100 metres (330 ft). The stadium has 59 entrances consisting of 49 inner gates and 10 outer gates. The parking lot allows 2,200 cars to park. The stadium can be reached by Seoul Subway Line 2, Line 9, or by bus.

Jamsil Baseball Stadium
Jamsil Baseball Stadium was renovated in 2007 for about 1.5 billion won. Grass on the field was replaced, drains were installed, and sprinkler were upgraded to prevent heavy rain damage. In 2009, a viewing party was held at the stadium for the final game of the 2009 World Baseball Classic between South Korea and Japan. After the 2012 baseball season, Seoul Metropolitan Facilities Management Corporation changed the soil of the ground for easier maintenance and prevention of injuries. They changed all seats except for the third floor, built a new locker room for the away team, and remodeled restrooms for fans.
 

Jamsil Arena

 

 Jamsil Arena (Korean: 잠실체육관), also known as Jamsil Indoor Stadium, is an indoor sporting arena. It is part of Seoul Sports Complex, located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 11,069 for basketball and was built from December 1976 to April 1979. The Seoul Samsung Thunders are the tenants.

Jamsil Arena hosted the basketball events and volleyball final of the 1988 Summer Olympics.

 File:Jamsil Arena.png
 

Jamsil Indoor Swimming Pool

 
Seoul Olympic Swimming Pool.jpg
Jamsil Indoor Swimming Pool (Korean: 잠실 제1수영장; Hanja: 蠶室第1水泳場) is an aquatics venue located in Seoul, South Korea. It hosted the swimming, diving, water polo, synchronized swimming, and the swimming part of the modern pentathlon events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. The venue was constructed from November 1977 to December 1980 and has a seating capacity of 8,000.

Jamsil Students' Gymnasium

 
Seoul Student Gymnasium.jpg
Jamsil Students' Gymnasium (Korean: 잠실학생체육관; Hanja: 蠶室學生體育館) is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 7,500 and was built from November 1972 to December 1976 to host Boxing events at the 1988 Summer Olympics, and wheelchair basketball events at the 1988 Summer Paralympics.

Seoul Olympic Stadium

 
The Seoul Olympic Stadium (Korean: 서울올림픽주경기장; Hanja: 서울올림픽主競技場), also known as Jamsil Olympic Stadium (formerly romanised as Chamshil), is a multi-purpose stadium in Seoul, South Korea. It is the main stadium built for the 1988 Summer Olympics and the 10th Asian Games in 1986. It is the centrepiece of the Seoul Sports Complex in the Songpa District, in the southeast of the city south of the Han River.
File:Seoul Olympic Stadium .jpg

Design and construction

This multi-purpose stadium was designed by Kim Swoo-geun. The lines of the stadium's profile imitate the elegant curves of a Korean Joseon Dynasty porcelain vase. Spectator seats are distributed on two tiers, totally covered. Initially built with a capacity of approximately 100,000, today it seats 69,950.

Before its construction, Seoul's largest venues were Dongdaemun Stadium and Hyochang Stadium. Seating 30,000 and 20,000 respectively, they were too small to attract world-class sporting events. Construction on the new stadium began in 1977 with the aim of staging the Asian Games in 1986. When Seoul was awarded the Games of the XXIV Olympiad in September 1981, this stadium became the centrepiece.

Sports

Officially, the stadium opened on 29 September 1984 and served as the site for the 10th Asian Games two years later, then the Olympics in 1988. However, it has not been used to stage a major world sporting event since then. It currently has no occupant, although the Korea Football Association has expressed interest in using the stadium for national team matches.

The events hosted by the stadium during the Olympics were the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, athletics, the football finals, and the equestrian jumping individual final

Olympic Park

 

Mongchontoseong

 
Mongchontoseong Earthen Fortification (Korean: 몽촌토성; Hanja: 夢村土城; RR: Mongchontoseong) is an ancient earthen rampart dating from the Baekje kingdom. It appears to have played the same role in defending the region the fortifications constructed on Mt. Acha. The fortification walls are estimated to have been about 2.7 kilometres (1.7 miles) in length and approximately 6 to 7 metres (20 to 23 feet) high. The fortifications of Mongchon Toseong had two unique features: a palisade atop the wall and a moat surrounding its base. They are part of Wiryeseong with Pungnaptoseong. It is located what is now in the Olympic Park of Seoul, South Korea. During the 1988 Summer Olympics, the running portion of the modern pentathlon event were hosted there. A number of important excavations of the site were conducted prior to the construction of the nearby Olympic Park.

SK Olympic Handball Gymnasium

 

SK Olympic Handball Gymnasium (Korean: SK올림픽핸드볼경기장; Hanja: SK奧林匹克手球運動場) is an indoor sporting arena located at the Olympic Park in Bangi-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, South Korea. The current seating capacity of the arena is 5,003. The arena was built from September 1984 to April 1986

It was known as the Olympic Fencing Gymnasium (Korean: 올림픽펜싱경기장; Hanja: 奧林匹克擊劍運動場) or Olympic Gymnasium No. 2 prior to 2011. The arena hosted the fencing and fencing part of the modern pentathlon events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

500px Seoul Olympic Park 2nd Gym

Olympic Gymnastics Arena

 

Olympic Gymnastics Arena (Korean: 올림픽체조경기장; Hanja: 奧林匹克體操競技場, also known as Olympic Gymnastics Hall and KSPO Dome) is an indoor sports arena, located within the Olympic Park, in Bangi-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, South Korea. It was constructed between 31 August 1984 and 30 April 1986, to host the gymnastics competitions at the 1988 Summer Olympics. It has a capacity of 15,000. The roof was designed by David H. Geiger. It is a self-supporting cable dome – the first of its kind ever built – with a four-layer fabric cladding.

Since the Olympics it has hosted a variety of events, notably as a concert venue for both South Korean and international artists.

Seoul Olympic Park 1st Gym.jpg

Seoul Olympic Park Tennis Center

 
Seoul Olympic Park Tennis Center is a tennis venue in Seoul, South Korea, located in the Olympic Park. It hosted the tennis events for the 1988 Summer Olympics and has hosted several South Korea Davis Cup team and South Korea Fed Cup team ties. The center currently hosts the Hansol Korea Open Tennis Championships. The main stadium has a capacity of 10,000 people. The No.1 court has a capacity of 3,500, and the other 12 courts have a capacity of 900.
Seoul Olympic Tennis Courts.jpg

Olympic Weightlifting Gymnasium

 

Olympic Weightlifting Gymnasium located in the Olympic Park area of Seoul, South Korea. It was constructed between August 1984 and April 1986, and hosted the weightlifting competitions for the 1988 Summer Olympics.

It has since been renamed to Woori Art Hall and is a musical theatre.

DSC09426

Olympic Velodrome (Seoul)

 
The Seoul Olympic Cyclodrome is a velodrome located at the Olympic Park in Seoul, South Korea. It hosted the track cycling events of the 1988 Summer Olympics. It was constructed from September 1984 to April 1986 and has a seating capacity of 6,000. 252 Velodrome 1988 Summer Olympic Games Seoul South Korea

New venues

 
The Busan Yachting Center (Korean: 수영만 요트경기장) is a yachting center in Busan, South Korea. Constructed between June 1983 and May 1986 after receiving permission from the Busan Port Authority in early 1982, the venue hosted the sailing competitions for the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

Misari Regatta

Misari Regatta is a boat racing track and park located in the neighborhood of Misa-dong in Hanam City, Gyeonggi Province, in the vicinity of 20 km east of Seoul, South Korea. It was established for the rowing and canoeing competition during the 1986 Asian Games and the 1988 Olympics. The place has a 4.4 million square meters in total, the lake area of which covers 2,212 m in length, 140m in width and depth 3m. The area was originally a small island surrounded by sand which made its scenery as beautiful as if it were waving, so was named "Misa-ri" (sand waving) in Korean

Hanyang University Gymnasium

 
Hanyang University Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 8,000 people and was built in 1986 to host volleyball events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Saemaul Sports Hall

 
Saemaul Sports Hall is an indoor arena located in Seoul, South Korea. Built from June 1984 to June 1986, it hosted the volleyball preliminaries for the 1988 Summer Olympics. At the Asian Games two years earlier, the hall hosted the judo competitions.

Sangmu Gymnasium

 
Sangmu Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seongnam, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 5,000 people and was built in 1986 to host wrestling events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Seoul Equestrian Park

 
LetsRun Park Seoul, also known a Seoul Race Park or Seoul Racecourse Park is a 40,000 capacity Korean thoroughbred racetrack in Gwacheon, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. It is host to many of Korea's most valuable thoroughbred horse races including the Korean Derby and Grand Prix. LetsRun Park Seoul is located next to Seoul Racecourse Park Station on Line 4 of the Seoul Metropolitan Subway. It is operated by the Korea Racing Authority (KRA). The current site at Gwacheon is the third home of LetsRun Park Seoul. The first was at a track in Sinseol-dong, Dongdaemun-gu, which was in operation from the early 1920s until just after the Korean War. Following the closure of the Sinseol-dong track, a new racetrack was constructed at Ttukseom, on the north bank of the Han River In February 1983, after South Korea was awarded the 1988 Summer Olympics, the KRA was given the task of organising the equestrian events.

Seoul National University Gymnasium

 
Seoul National University Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Seoul, South Korea. The capacity of the arena is 5,000 people and was built in 1986 to host table tennis and badminton (demonstration) events at the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Suwon Gymnasium

 
Suwon Gymnasium is an indoor sporting arena located in Suwon, South Korea. The arena has a capacity for 5,145 spectators and was built in 1984 to host handball events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. Today, Suwon Gymnasium is part of the Suwon Sports Complex.
Suwon Gymnasium.JPG

Existing venues

 

Hwarang Archery Field

 
The Hwarang Archery Field is an archery field constructed between November 1985 and January 1986, and then renovated between May and August 1988. It hosted the archery competitions for the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul.

Jangchung Arena

 
The Jangchung Arena (Korean: 장충체육관) is an indoor sporting arena located in Jung District, Seoul, South Korea. Volleyball teams GS Caltex Seoul KIXX and Seoul Woori Card Wibee are the tenants. At first, the arena was an army gymnasium, built on 23 June 1955.[3] It was later fully reconstructed and opened on 1 February 1963. In 1966, the venue hosted a boxing match between Kim Ki-soo and Nino Benvenuti, where Kim became the first South Korean to win boxing world championship. During the 1970s, the venue hosted the presidential elections and inaugurations of Park Chung-hee and Choi Kyu-hah. The venue hosted judo and taekwondo events at the 1988 Summer Olympics. After the 2012–2014 renovation, the capacity of the arena is 4,507 jangchung gymnasium

Royal Bowling Center

 
The Royal Bowling Center is a bowling alley located in Seoul, South Korea. It hosted the bowling demonstration events during the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Seongnam Sports Complex

 

Seongnam Sports Complex (Korean: 성남종합운동장) is a group of sports facilities in Seongnam, South Korea.

The complex consists of the Seongnam Stadium, Field hockey field, and Indoor Arena.


Seongnam Indoor Arena

The Seongnam Indoor Arena with a capacity for 5,711 spectators was used by a volleyball team Seongnam Korea Expressway Corporation Hi-pass Zenith of V-League, until the team was relocated to Gimcheon.
Seongnam Sports Complex

Seongnam Stadium

It is a multi-purpose stadium in Seongnam, South Korea. It was built in December 1984 and used for field hockey matches at the 1988 Summer Olympics, but it is currently used mostly for football matches. It was the main stadium of Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma (currently Seongnam FC) until 2004. Now, Seongnam FC uses Tancheon Stadium as their home stadium for most of their games. The stadium holds 27,000 people (21,242 seats) and the city government is considering reconstruction of the stadium, because of its decrepit condition.

Taenung International Shooting Range

 
The Taenung International Shooting Range is a firing range located in Seoul, South Korea. Constructed in 1972, it hosted the ISSF World Shooting Championships (then the UIT World Shooting Championships) in 1978, the first time an international sporting event of this magnitude took place in the country. It was renovated in 1987-8 before the Olympics to comply with International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF, then UIT) standards. The venue hosted the shooting and the shooting portion of the modern pentathlon events for the 1988 Summer Olympics.

Tongillo Road Course

 

The Tongillo Road Course was a temporary road course that was repaired between March 1987 and August 1988. The course was located in the Tongil-ro section of Seoul between the Philippine Expeditionary Forces To Korea memorial and Munsan, located north of Seoul on the unification road, which is off exit 16 of the Seoul Ring Expressway.

During the 1988 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the all three road cycling events. The circuit used for the individual road race was 16.4 km (10.2 mi) long and was twelve laps for men and five laps for women. For the men's road team time trial event, the circuit was 25 km (16 mi) long and required two round trips to complete the required 100 km (62 mi).

Football venues

Busan Gudeok Stadium

The Busan Gudeok Stadium (Korean: 부산 구덕 운동장; Hanja: 釜山九德運動場) is a multi-purpose stadium in Busan, South Korea. It is currently used mostly for football matches. The stadium currently holds 12,349 spectators but previously had a capacity of 30,000 spectators. The venue opened in September 1928. During the 1988 Summer Olympics, it hosted some of the Olympic football matches. It was also the main venue for the 1997 East Asian Games hosting the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as the athletics and football competitions. Professional football team Busan IPark have played their home games at the venue since 2015 as well as between 1997 and 2002. Additionally, non-league football team Busan Transport Corporation FC have played their home games at the venue since 2006. Gudeok Stadium 3.JPG

1988 Summer Olympics

During the 1988 Summer Olympics held in Seoul, eight soccer games took place at the Gudeok stadium including all three of South Korea's matches and one semi-final match. 180 players accompanied by 72 officials from nine countries competed for eleven days from September 17 through September 27, attracting a total of 146,320 spectators or 18,290 on average per day. A total of 675 million won was spent on the stadium before the tournament to improve the electronic scoreboard and other facilities.

Daegu Civic Stadium

The Daegu Civic Stadium (Korean: 대구시민운동장) was a sports complex in Daegu, South Korea. The stadium was used mostly for football matches of Daegu FC. During the 1986 Asian Games and 1988 Summer Olympics, it hosted some football matches. The stadium had a capacity of 30,000 (19,467 seats) and opened on 20 April 1948. The stadium was expanded and reconstructed in 1975, and was renovated and repaired on 8 September 2003. The complex was demolished in 2017, and the new DGB Daegu Bank Park was built at the same place. File:DaeguCivil stadium2.JPG

Daejeon Hanbat Stadium

The Daejeon stadium (main stadium) has a capacity of 20,618 and opened in 1964. It was used by Daejeon Citizens before Daejeon World Cup Stadium opened and the team relocated in 2001. It hosted several football preliminaries during the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul. Daejeon Hanbat Stadium

Dongdaemun Stadium

The Dongdaemun Stadium, was a sports complex in Seoul, South Korea and included a multi-purpose stadium, a baseball park and other sports facilities. It was located near the Dongdaemun or Great East Gate and the surrounding Dongdaemun market and had many vendors selling athletics-related goods. It was demolished in 2008 to make way for the Dongdaemun Design Plaza & Park.

The main multi-purpose stadium remained the main center for sports events in Seoul until the Seoul Sports Complex was built for the 1988 Olympic Games.

seoul dongdaemun1

Gwangju Mudeung Stadium

Gwangju Mudeung Stadium is a sports complex in Gwangju, South Korea. Main stadium is currently used mostly for football matches and has a capacity of 30,000 people and was opened in 1966. During the 1988 Summer Olympics, it hosted some football matches. This complex has Gwangju Mudeung Baseball Stadium and gymnasium.
Gwangju Mudeung Stadium.JPG
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